Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 13, 2017, 04:24:08 AM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 813 814 [815] 816 817 ... 1169 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1834169 times)
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13703

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12210 on: July 02, 2013, 01:44:07 PM »

No, there are enough of these incidental stories--to say nothing of the French threat--to keep interest up. It's just that the payoffs at the end are all so small.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13703

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12211 on: July 03, 2013, 06:08:52 AM »

The Lone Ranger (2013) - 2/10. The film starts off with an exciting runaway train sequence, followed by a manhunt through the desert. Early on it seems this could be taken for a serious Western, but as things move along it gets progressively sillier, ending up as little more than a cartoon. This is not the worst of its faults.

Unhappily, this  film, pitched at school kids on summer break, is filled with a pernicious message. When we are introduced to the man who will become the Lone Ranger (Armie Hammer) he is reading John Locke. He is a law school grad, concerned with the justice and due process, who has returned to his Texas town to be its DA (huh?). The purpose of everything that then happens is to disabuse him of his notions of right and wrong and provide him with an unsentimental education. Because, as it turns out, everything having to do with the white man’s civilization is evil. The Indians are noble victims; the Chinese coolies who work the white man’s mines are also victims. The railroads, the army, all the institutions of white civilization, however, are corrupt. What then is a good-hearted man to do? He must operate as an outlaw. Hence the mask. In the original radio and TV versions of the Lone Ranger, IIRC, the mask was intended to hide the Ranger’s identity, it was a superhero’s mask. In this movie, the character’s identity is never in doubt. The mask is solely to establish the fact that the wearer lives outside the white man’s law. Tonto (Johnny Depp) keeps telling the hero “Never take off the mask.” Not only the Ranger, but a little kid Tonto is teaching—the audience’s surrogate—learns this “truth” by the end of the film.

The references in this movie to OUATITW include but are not limited to: majestic shots of Monument Valley; evil railroaders; men in dusters waiting for a train; the shadow of a man revealing his presence on the roof of a car; startled birds taking flight as a harbinger of a homestead attack; an Indian boy who suffered a terrible loss returning as a man to exact revenge on those responsible. This last is made even more explicit by having the villain ask, “Who are you?” and receiving in reply a symbol-fraught object that jogs his memory at the point of dying. So keen are the filmmakers to reference Leone’s film that during one scene where men are riding through a canyon one of the walls has a Navajo cliff CGI’d in—it has no function other than to be spotted.  And from time to time faint echoes of Morricone’s score appear on the soundtrack. What is the purpose of all these allusions? Apparently, just to let the audience know how cool the filmmakers are. This is another truth I think I’ll ignore.

« Last Edit: July 03, 2013, 06:12:09 AM by dave jenkins » Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12212 on: July 03, 2013, 06:35:01 AM »

Your review matches exactly the ones I was reading on RT. Thanks Jenkins, I'll save my money.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8445

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #12213 on: July 03, 2013, 11:08:28 PM »

The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond (1960) 9/10. Ray Danton is the flinty-hearted bastard who rises to the top of the rackets and Karen Steele is the bimbo he suckers on more than one occasion. Then the flinty-hearted bastard dies. Wonderfully paced gangster pic in b & w and widescreen. Possibly Budd Boetticher's best film.

Just saw The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond on TCM. I give it a 7/10
The movie was shown in a 4:3 aspect ratio. Being a 1960 movie, I know this is supposed to be widescreen (IMDB lists it as 1.85:1; Amazon says the dvd is 16:9). Anyway, since this is in flat widescreen, I assume that the 4:3 version on TCM is actually showing the full frame that was filmed, so you see more on the top and bottom, as opposed to less on the sides as in pan-and-scan, right? It still sucks that they didn't show it as it was intended to be seen, in widescreen, but I guess it is a tiny bit less annoying knowing you are seeing more than you were supposed to see, than pan-and-scan, where you are seeing less than you were supposed to see.

« Last Edit: July 04, 2013, 03:19:20 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12780


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #12214 on: July 04, 2013, 05:23:00 AM »

Just saw The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond on TCM. I give it a 7/10
The movie was shown in a 4:3 aspect ratio. Being a 1960 movie, I know this is supposed to be widescreen (IMDB lists it as 1.85:1; Amazon says the dvd is 16:9). Anyway, since this is in flat widescreen, I assume that the 4:3 version on TCM is actually showing the full frame that was filmed, so you see more on the top and bottom, as opposed to less on the sides as in pan-and-scan, right? It still sucks that they didn't show it as it was intended to be seen, in widescreen, but I guess it is a tiny bit less annoying knowing you are seeing more than you were supposed to see, than pan-and-scan, where you are seeing less than you were supposed to see.

See it before but I did I did catch most of it yesterday on TCM I'm probably leaning ore towards a 7 than a 9.

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12780


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #12215 on: July 05, 2013, 08:03:21 PM »

The 400 Blows 9/10

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12216 on: July 05, 2013, 08:40:53 PM »

Zodiac - 9/10 - What's this, 4th viewing now? Maybe I'm obsessed, but then I can think of worse movies to watch over and over again.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13703

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12217 on: July 06, 2013, 07:53:13 AM »

Sawdust and Tinsel / Gycklarnas afton (1953) - 8/10. In turn-of-the-century Sweden—19th to 20th, natch—the circus comes to town. Trouble is, it’s not a very good circus, as its destitute ringleader (Ake Gronberg) knows. His mistress, the bareback rider (Harriet Andersson) also knows. Both want out of their relationship and their lives as circus people, and are hoping the provincial town they’ve come to will provide them with the means of escape. But, as they will separately learn, bourgeois life is for them illusory, and anyway, the show must go on. Bergman makes the connection between the circus and the theater explicit, so this film could be considered the first of a theater trilogy that continues with Smiles Of a Summer Night (1955) and concludes with The Magician (1958). According to Peter Cowie, who provides commentary of the Criterion disc, the film owes a lot to one with Emil Jannings—I think it’s called Jealousy (1925)--but with lines from Strindberg thrown in. Cowie is a knowledgeable man, and I don’t doubt what he says, but Professor Jenkins was struck by how similar the movie is to a couple made by Ozu, A Story of Floating Weeds (1934), and its remake, Floating Weeds (1959). It’s unlikely, however, that Ozu and Bergman knew each other’s work. N.B. This is the first time Bergman worked with Sven Nykvist, one of 3 cinematographers on the picture.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13703

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12218 on: July 06, 2013, 09:33:25 AM »

I Shot Jesse James (1949) 6/10. A film by Samuel Fuller. Available today for free viewing on Hulu: http://www.hulu.com/watch/482857

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12219 on: July 06, 2013, 01:02:17 PM »

KILLING THEM SOFTLY - 7/10

Great atmosphere, good characters, very good acting (the worst actor being Brad Pitt, whose only crime is to do a regular job), good dialogues and very tiny script (they obviously focused on dialogues and drew a few parallels with the economic crisis).
Not much to criticise here, except that it's one of the few 7/10 movies that will not bring anything more to the table with rewatches.

Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12220 on: July 06, 2013, 06:21:23 PM »

THE LAST OF US - 8/10

As a video game, it deserves 9.5/10, but I'm rating it as a movie here. As a whole, it's really not far from being called an "interactive movie" rather than a video game. The last two titles from its developper (Naughty Dog) make me wonder about the future of movies and video games: so far we have 2 terms for 2 different form of entertainment, I'm not sure it will stay this way.

Great adult zombie flick. Mix the backgrounds from The Walking Dead and Children Of Men and then add real caracters like in The Road and you've got the best zombie movie I know of (or let's say it share the title with Zombieland). The acting is top notch, the plot is really good and the twists work quite well and are not treated as twists. Very adult, like I said. I was very sad to leave the characters at the end; the atmosphere stays with you long after you turn off the Playstation.
Also, it has a perfect ending.

Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8445

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #12221 on: July 07, 2013, 01:27:31 AM »

Zodiac - 9/10 - What's this, 4th viewing now? Maybe I'm obsessed, but then I can think of worse movies to watch over and over again.

what did you think of Mark Ruffalo as the detective? I think he was alright, but not GREAT. Det. David Toschi was some huge hotshot, the guy who inspired Frank Bullitt and Dirty Harry Callahan, and I thought Ruffalo is just kinda ordinary. I wouldn't say Ruffalo is a bad actor, but I don't think he's anything particularly special. That's the sorta thing that can make the difference between a good movie and a great movie. My rating would be an 8/10.

So, since I am SURE that after seeing the movie, you must have read every book there is to read on the Zodiac killings - especially the one by Robert Graysmith - who do you think was the killer? was it the guy Graysmith wrote about? or was it someone else whom they never suspected?

« Last Edit: July 07, 2013, 01:35:34 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12222 on: July 07, 2013, 03:59:31 AM »

Ruffalo is the kind of actor whose best asset is his personal charisma. He's not a bad actor at all since he can play most emotions quite good, bu he's just not the kind of guy I would ask to enter a character. Hence, he's always good and as a viewer I'm always pleased to see him, in Zodiac like in pretty much anything else, but like you say, he's never great.

It would have done the difference between a good and great movie, but he's not the main character at all. I'd give it a 9 too (and I watch it every year, after a real obsession whenI got the DVD).

Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 2987



View Profile
« Reply #12223 on: July 07, 2013, 08:15:03 AM »

Le amiche - Michelangelo Antonioni, 1955

Not his first film, but his first typical film. 8,5/10

Red Desert - Antonioni, 1964

8/10

Logged

Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12224 on: July 07, 2013, 08:45:38 AM »

what did you think of Mark Ruffalo as the detective? I think he as alright, but not GREAT. Det. David Toschi was some huge hotshot, the guy who inspired Frank Bullitt and Dirty Harry Callahan, and I thought Ruffalo is just kinda ordinary. I wouldn't say Ruffalo is a bad actor, but I don't think he's anything particularly special.

Ruffalo's actually my favorite performance in the movie. His low-key approach to the character works very well, I think; he's a hardworking cop being driven crazy by the case. Toschi, or at least the movie's Toschi, is more eccentric than flamboyant, I guess would be the point. Perhaps one could even see a deconstruction of his persona as the "real" Dirty Harry and Bullitt.

I'll agree with Noodles that he's not a great actor. To be honest, I haven't been impressed with him anywhere outside of Zodiac. Here though I think Ruffalo's low-key style serves the movie/character well.

Quote
So, since I am SURE that after seeing the movie, you must have read every book there is to read on the Zodiac killings - especially the one by Robert Graysmith - who do you think was the killer? was it the guy Graysmith wrote about? or was it someone else whom they never suspected?

I actually haven't read anything more than a few articles, so I don't feel qualified to call register an opinion. It does seem a lot of Zodiac buffs dislike the movie for promoting Graysmith's pet theory of Leigh Allen as the killer, when hard evidence against him is scanty.

« Last Edit: July 07, 2013, 08:47:32 AM by Groggy » Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
Pages: 1 ... 813 814 [815] 816 817 ... 1169 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.042 seconds with 20 queries.