Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 14, 2017, 01:56:32 PM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 830 831 [832] 833 834 ... 1170 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1836624 times)
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12465 on: September 16, 2013, 04:50:29 AM »

I only watched it once and found it utterly ridiculous. And this comes from one of the biggest Scorsese fan you'll ever meet.
I remember Scorsese taking metaphorical events/actions from the Bible (and I'm talking about events that are explicitly metaphorical, such as the ripped heart part) and shooting them as regular stuff.
The cinematography is also terrible. Scorsese is always less powerful when he stays away from his usual fast paced editing for too long.
The idea to show Judas as the real hero is kind of cool, but also unimpressive ("Remakes Screenwriting 101").

Of course, all this wouldn't be to much of a problem if the film had not bored me to death.

Don't get me wrong, this is known as one of Marty's most personal works and when you go really personal it always mean being ridiculous to many people. I just though it was an honorable failure on most aspects. What did you like? I will certainly give it another shot one of these days, since I own the DVD.

« Last Edit: September 16, 2013, 05:13:19 AM by noodles_leone » Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
moviesceleton
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3928


The glance that makes holes in the silver screen


View Profile
« Reply #12466 on: September 16, 2013, 05:41:29 PM »

I agree with you on the cinematography (the lighting was cheap or just bad, but I had no problem with the angles, compositions or staging). Also some of the soundtrack choices were too over the top for me.

What made the film for me was that for the first time I actually cared for Jesus as a character. In all the other films he is just the sum of his preachings - here he has a problem I can relate to and he responds to his hardships in a believable way. I relate to his will to live (= to drink, to eat, to dance, to make love, to work, to laugh) and his unwillingness to abandon life. Only a lunatic would die without hesitation. Only a lunatic would follow the voices in his head without second thoughts. Only a lunatic would believe he is the Messiah right away. Only a lunatic wouldn't be afraid. And you can't identify with a lunatic. But Jesus in this film I could identify with.

To me the film isn't as much about religion as it is about what it means to be a human being. What it means to live and what it means to die. What do we live for and what do we die for. In the end it's a story about choosing between your life and your responsibility - and that story never gets old.

I recently read For Whom the Bell Tolls and strangely I feel that that book and this film speak very much about same things. But that's just me.

Logged

"Once Upon a Time in America gets ten-minute ovation at Cannes"
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12783


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #12467 on: September 18, 2013, 09:15:54 AM »

Gambling House (1950) first watch, Director: Ted Tetzlaff, Writers: Marvin Borowsky (screenplay), Allen Rivkin, Erwin Gelsey (screenplay), Stars: Victor Mature, Terry Moore, William Bendix. Small time racketeer Marc Fury agrees to plead self-defense for a murder committed by gang boss Joe Farrow in exchange for Farrow's I.O.U. for $50,000. not bad at all. Outstanding opening and ending sequences, a bit soft core in the middle, Mature is great, on TCM today almost missed it 7/10

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13705

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12468 on: September 18, 2013, 11:24:01 AM »

Le ciel est vous (1944) 8/10. Jean Gremillon's portrait of a working-class couple (Charles Vanel and Madeleine Renaud) with a lust to fly. Based on real events, the film doesn't leave out the cost imposed on the children by the parents' obsession. In spite of this--perhaps because of it--the depiction of domestic happiness rings true. The final act is a bit predictable, though. Before that, the plot had me guessing.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12469 on: September 21, 2013, 07:37:45 AM »

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre - 10/10 - 4th viewing.

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows - 4/10 - Typically bombastic sequel has Holmes and Watson fighting Moriarty's efforts to trigger World War I twenty years early. The original was entertaining popcorn fluff, but this movie really amps up the annoying elements. The gag of stopping to show how Sherlock plans his fight moves grows tiresome here; do we really need a two-minute sidebar on how Holmes rigged a henchman's rifle to misfire? Not to mention the obnoxious slow motion throughout the big action scenes. The movie wastes some good casting, with Noomi Rapace and Jared Harris handling one-note characters respectably and Stephen Fry an ideal Mycroft Holmes. Robert Downey goes from charmingly eccentric to obnoxious; Jude Law's just sort of there. Hans Zimmer's score riffs heavily on Morricone: the main theme sounds more like Farewell to Cheyenne than ever, and there's even a piece resembling the Two Mules for Sister Sara theme. It's a nice blip in a joyless monstrosity.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13705

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12470 on: September 21, 2013, 04:47:38 PM »

Vertigo (1958) -11/10. 35mm projection. I've seen Vertigo about 30 times: on TV, VHS, LD, DVD, and Blu-ray. Now at last, after all these years, I've finally seen it on film (I guess I need to see it on DCP to complete my run). The print I watched was apparently struck for the 1996 re-launch; it has the modern Universal logo, the erroneously colored face of the anonymous woman in the credits, the awful restoration Foley. It's also badly beat up in places, and has faded colors in the early reels (well, the print is 17 years old after all). No matter. Even in less-than-ideal form, the work can still move me. It's also a kind of cinematic miracle. Thank you, Bernard Herrmann, for composing the greatest film score on the planet. Thank you, James Stewart, for channeling the High Priest of Kink. And thank you, George Steiner, for publishing in the same year of Vertigo's release--coincidentally?--"The Death of Tragedy," in which you persuasively argue that that ancient Greek dramatic form can't possibly exist in a democratic/post-Romantic age, before supplying us with this most apposite of definitions: "Tragedy is a deliberate advance to the edge of life, where the mind must look on blackness at the risk of vertigo." [italics added] Not only does Vertigo transcend its genre (dramatic film), it partakes of--and  simultaneously regenerates--another genre long dead. Films don't usually do that.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #12471 on: September 21, 2013, 11:07:31 PM »

In addition to The 7th Seal and Persona, to me at least Wild Strawberries, Through a Glass Darkly, Whispers and Cries, Fanny and Alexander and Scenes from a Marriage are good films. I need to rewatch Winter Light.


I just saw Winter Light (first time I ever saw a Bergman movie). I thought it was well-made for what it was, but the story just didn't interest me at all.

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #12472 on: September 23, 2013, 10:54:31 AM »

Vertigo (1958) -11/10. 35mm projection. I've seen Vertigo about 30 times: on TV, VHS, LD, DVD, and Blu-ray. Now at last, after all these years, I've finally seen it on film (I guess I need to see it on DCP to complete my run). The print I watched was apparently struck for the 1996 re-launch; it has the modern Universal logo, the erroneously colored face of the anonymous woman in the credits, the awful restoration Foley. It's also badly beat up in places, and has faded colors in the early reels (well, the print is 17 years old after all).

how did the infamous blue suits look?

On TCM, where I saw the movie recently, the blue of the suits of the jury members during the inquest scene, as well as Stewart's blue suit on his first visit to Ernie's after he recovers, and the blue skirt of Bel Geddes, were all this weird shade (I recall one dvd reviewer calling it 'LSD blue')

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13705

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12473 on: September 24, 2013, 01:35:18 PM »

I just saw Winter Light (first time I ever saw a Bergman movie). I thought it was well-made for what it was, but the story just didn't interest me at all.
Story? There's a story? All I've ever found in it is 81 minutes of ugly Swedish people kvetching.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #12474 on: September 24, 2013, 10:50:20 PM »

Story? There's a story? All I've ever found in it is 81 minutes of ugly Swedish people kvetching.

 Grin

The church that is featured in the movie, is that Lutheran? Are those priests allowed to marry?

« Last Edit: September 24, 2013, 11:01:29 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #12475 on: September 24, 2013, 10:58:12 PM »

TCM showed The Battleship Potemkin the other day (part of its "The Story of Film" series), I watched it, the first time I've ever watched a silent film. (No, I won't be rushing out to see more silent films.)

So, I've read about how various bands/individuals have composed different scores for the movie; I'm not sure which score TCM used. But at times, the music felt like it had nothing to do with what was happening on screen. Like during a tense scene (heck, all the scenes in this film are tense), this lush symphony playing, seemingly oblivious to what was happening on screen. I know that some of the scores used symphonies by Dmitri Shostakovich; I have no idea if this was one of his songs.
Anyway, I guess it's not much different than the experience of watching the movie in a theater in 1925; cuz every movie had its own orchestra (or pianist or whatever) and the scores probably varied greatly from theater to theater.

This film may have been mighty influential in the history of cinema, but I, for one, am thrilled I was born after the invention of talkies  Wink

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #12476 on: September 25, 2013, 12:15:02 AM »

Picnic (1955) 8/10

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13705

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12477 on: September 25, 2013, 06:19:34 AM »

The church that is featured in the movie, is that Lutheran? Are those priests allowed to marry?
Yes and yes. They're also employees of the Swedish government and eligible for a state pension.

Psycho II (1982) - 7/10. First Blu-ray viewing. In the 80s I had a lot of free time, and since matinee movie tickets were only a couple dollars, I saw a lot of films. I didn't much care what I saw, and went to everything, expecting very little in most cases. So no one was more surprised than me when it turned out this film not only did not completely suck, but had a clever plot that actually kept me guessing. Almost from the start the central question is presented: is the rehabilitated Norman Bates sliding back into insanity, or is someone out to Gaslight him? Then the murders start, and it seems like there's another element in play [SPOILER The film's alternative title could be Psycho Too END SPOILER]. With Anthony Perkins and Vera Miles returning to their roles from the first film, plus Robert Loggia and Meg Tilly--who was really cute, but couldn't act a lick.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12478 on: September 25, 2013, 07:51:50 AM »

This film may have been mighty influential in the history of cinema, but I, for one, am thrilled I was born after the invention of talkies  Wink

It's not nearly as good as Strike or October.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13705

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12479 on: September 26, 2013, 11:27:01 AM »

Two I first saw on Turner, now out on Blu from Olive Films:

Plunder Road
(1957) - 7/10. The railroad gold robbery was so perfectly planned, nothing could possibly go wrong! Er . . . maybe the plan wasn't all that great, actually. Why is it so important to get on the road after the heist? Wouldn't it be better to lie low for a week or two until things die down, rather than try to negotiate all the roadblocks? And if you're going to split up the loot among separate vehicles, wouldn't it be better to send them on different routes? If the first one gets caught (and it does) the cops will certainly scrutinize all that come after (and they do), especially when they're rolling only 30 minutes apart.  And when you get to LA, is it really such a good idea to melt down some of the gold into fixtures for your car, especially when you're gonna end up carrying many of the actual bars anyway? And who in his right mind plans the final leg of the journey to cross LA during rush hour, allowing only a half hour cushion? Lots of things in this film don't really make sense. Why are the crooks hurrying to the hijack point at the start of the film? Wouldn't it have been prudent to get there many hours earlier, to both set up carefully AND make sure you're there on time? In spite of all these stupidities, the film is a lot of fun. We never find out why all the hurry was necessary at the start, but dramatically it gives the film a lot of forward momentum that hardly ever lets up. Cutting back and forth between the three trucks does a lot to sustain interest. And the b&w RegalScope photography--fabulous.

God's Little Acre (1958) - 6/10. What a cast! Robert Ryan (!). Vic Morrow (!). Jack Lord (!) Aldo Ray (!!) Buddy Hackett (??) Michael Landon (as the albino) and Introducing Tina Louise (!!!). Pretty weird film though: as Savant says, everybody talks like they're out of the Li'l Abner comic. Ryan is especially bizarre, as if he were doing some kind of caricature of a Southern hick.  Something to experience, though.

« Last Edit: September 26, 2013, 01:21:37 PM by dave jenkins » Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Pages: 1 ... 830 831 [832] 833 834 ... 1170 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.512 seconds with 20 queries.