Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 15, 2017, 01:04:37 PM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 Members and 4 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 854 855 [856] 857 858 ... 1170 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1838503 times)
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12825 on: December 20, 2013, 05:33:49 PM »

Red Monarch - 7/10 - Made-for-TV satire with Colin Blakely as Stalin. Extremely broad (Charles Wood isn't the most subtle writer) but usually funny, though Stalin comes off more as an Ulster Idi Amin than the real thing. Some great scenes, like a weird interview with Carrol Baker as a hick American journalist, as Stalin's flunkies project My Darling Clementine behind him.

Stalin - 5/10 - HBO biopic circa 1992. Beautifully shot on location, meticulously researched, and dull. Besides being a TV movie it falls victim to the usual biopic pitfalls; you can't cover 40 years of history in three hours without seeming superficial. When the movie stops to breathe (eg. the Great Terror in the late '30s) it's compelling, but subjects like Stalin's rivalry with Trotsky and the entire Second World War are treated parenthetically. The tedious, melodramatic scenes with Stalin's family don't help. Robert Duvall isn't ideal casting either; he comes off as Tom Hagen with bad makeup and a phony accent, especially when he convinces a flunky to kill himself to spare his family... The best performance comes from Roshan Seth, chillingly effective as Lavrentiy Beria.

The Way Back - 7/10 - Peter Weir's most recent flick, detailing the escape of several inmates in a Siberian gulag through Central Asia. Beautifully shot as usual for Weir and mostly absorbing, but it feels empty: the characters are one-dimensional (though the acting is quite good, especially Ed Harris and Saorise Ronan) and there's little real tension for much of the run time.

« Last Edit: December 20, 2013, 05:35:52 PM by Groggy » Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12826 on: December 21, 2013, 12:20:30 AM »

The Lion in Winter - 6/10 - 2nd viewing. Rewatched it for a Peter O'Toole tribute I'm writing, and my opinion remains roughly the same. Turns out there is such a thing as being "too clever by half." At least Katherine Hepburn doesn't annoy me as much as she used to.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12783


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #12827 on: December 21, 2013, 04:20:28 AM »

Violent Saturday (1955) 9/10. Stephen McNally arrives by bus in “Bradenville” (played by Bisbee, AZ). Unwisely crossing the street in front of the parked bus, he’s almost hit by a sleek sports car driven by the town’s leading adulteress, Mrs. Boyd Fairchild (Margaret Hayes). Rearranging the golf bag in the front seat before putting her car back in gear, Mrs. Fairchild shoots McNally a murderous look –the irony!—and drives on. Their paths won’t cross again until Saturday, Violent Saturday. McNally finally makes it to the other side of the street, and there stands the bank he’s come to rob. But it isn’t yet Saturday (a Saturday which will be violent!), so he turns and walks past. As he goes, the bank manager (Tommy Noonan) raises the blinds of a picture window and looks out—he too has a date with Violent Saturday. McNally arrives at his hotel, and, checking in, spies Linda (Virginia Leith), the object to every man’s desire. A nurse at the local hospital, she forms a skein in Fate’s Tapestry as well (Fate’s Violent Tapestry!). Meanwhile McNally’s two henchmen, J. Carrol Naish and Lee Marvin (with a sinus condition), are on a train, Bradenville bound. Naish notices some Amish children in their car and gives them candy. We will learn that Naish often gives children candy. Marvin, by contrast, won’t pass up an opportunity later to step on a child’s fingers. Back in Bradenville, McNally is studying the lay of the land, on the relief map in the town library. Miss Braden (Sylvia Sydney), the librarian and, presumably, a descendant of the city’s founder, has fallen on hard times and is tempted to steal from a patron. McNally observes her with cynical relish, then steps outside to witness a fight between schoolboys. The father of one of the boys arrives—it’s Victor Mature!—and questions his son, then has to get back to work. He’s a vice-president at Fairchild Copper, Bradenville’s only industry. The other vice-president is Boyd Fairchild (Richard Egan), drunk in his office and sick about his wandering wife. He has his secretary put in a call for her at the country club—and CUT, there she is, golfing with her current squeeze, Brad Dexter. And so it goes, Rififi meeting La Ronde. When Naish and Marvin hit town, their paths too begin interweaving with those of the townsfolk. A final thread is supplied by an Amish farmer played by Ernest Borgnine in a funny beard (“I thank thee, neighbor.”). Borgnine enters the picture carrying a pitchfork, and seasoned theatergoers know that Chekhov has a rule about that: if you show a character in Act One carrying a loaded pitchfork, that pitchfork must go off by Act Three. And Act Three here is Saturday, Violent Saturday, the place where all paths converge . . . . . violently.

At one point Lee Marvin comments that Virginia Leith’s Linda is built like a Swiss watch, but the same could be said of Richard Fleischer’s film and its precision-instrument plot. Never have scenes been more artfully joined; never have Cinemascope frames been better composed; never have movements within those frames been more persuasively motivated or performed with such economy.

Twilight Time brought the movie out on DVD a while ago, using elements they claimed weren’t good enough for an HD transfer. But Carlotta in France has since produced this stunning Blu-ray from other elements. The transfer is mind-bogglingly great, a 10/10 (It makes“Color by De Luxe” actually mean something). I doubt the film looked this good even when projected in 1955.

There are two supplements, one in French without subtitles, but one in English, an insightful appreciation of the movie by William Friedkin [one has to wonder if the film didn’t influence Mr. Friedkin’s own Sorcerer]. The disc is region-coded “B”.


Watched this on Youtube very entertaining, Bradenville/Bisbee reminded me of Butte, Montana. I thought Victor Mature was a police officer, I'll have to watch it again.

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12828 on: December 21, 2013, 06:18:53 AM »

Watched this on Youtube very entertaining, Bradenville/Bisbee reminded me of Butte, Montana.
Yes, I had that very thought! But then I didn't see any tailings ponds . . .  Grin

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8447

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #12829 on: December 21, 2013, 04:10:50 PM »

Re: Faye Dunaway: maybe I prefer her more in "bad girl"-type roles. I loved her as Bonnie in BONNIE & CLYDE, as the whore who becomes Doc Holliday's girlfriend in DOC, and as the private detective in THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR (not what you think of typically as "bad girl" but definitely not squeaky clean). But I did not like her in CHINATOWN or in her Oscar-winning role in NETWORK.

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12830 on: December 21, 2013, 05:52:14 PM »

I don't like anything about Network, so I agree with you there, but I still don't understand why you don't like Dunaway in Chinatown. She meets the very criterion you're using. For much of the film she operates as a femme fatale or potential femme fatale--Jake (and we with him) have a hard time making her out. First it appears that she has something to do with her husband's death. Then, after she saves Jake's ass and uses it as a chew toy, she seems like someone he can trust. But when she takes off to the house where the missing girl is living, it appears again that she might be up to something. Yeah, by the end it's made clear that she's essentially a victim, but up to that point there is enough mystery surrounding her that she could be a bad girl--the double-cross could come at any minute, one feels. The first time through the movie, anyway. On subsequent viewings it's impossible to see her as a femme fatale, of course.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8447

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #12831 on: December 21, 2013, 07:15:05 PM »

There was something weird abouut her, maybe I just didn't like it or find it believable cuz I know Faye Dunaway loooking differently... But I'm gonna watch the movie soon, so I'll reasses my opinion of it.... Re: NETWORK, it was good not great, I saw it a while ago I believe I gave it a 7.5/10

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12832 on: December 22, 2013, 08:40:07 PM »

Dean Spanley - 7/10 - Jeremy Northam, dissatisfied Edwardian, grows enchanted by Sam Neill's eccentric clergyman. Neill (doing a fine James Mason impression) thinks he's the reincarnation of a dog, recalling his past life with unusual vividness. Somehow this inspires Northam, who hopes Neill's delusions will charm his diffident father (Peter O'Toole). One of those movies that's pleasant to watch, but you wonder what's the point. The last 15-20 minutes are really powerful though, thanks mostly to Peter O'Toole. Bryan Brown gets points too for a snarky supporting role.

Gangster Squad - 4/10 - A tedious vomit of cliches, obnoxious pseudo-style and Sean Penn's frothing overacting. But hey, Emma Stone looked nice in that red dress.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #12833 on: December 23, 2013, 08:24:05 AM »

Inside Llewyn Davis (2013) - 10/10. 4K. A flawless film. The Coens' decision to keep their satire machine turned off for this one was very wise. Hey, whadya know, life presented straight still provides plenty of humor. Ultimately the film is about the music, and T Bone Burnett's selection of songs is immaculate. Oscar Isaac, whose singing and playing were all shot live, gives something more than a fantastic character performance.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
PowerRR
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3008


View Profile
« Reply #12834 on: December 23, 2013, 09:58:11 AM »

American Hustle is an 8

Logged
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12835 on: December 23, 2013, 01:04:38 PM »

Inside Llewyn Davis (2013) - 10/10. 4K. A flawless film. The Coens' decision to keep their satire machine turned off for this one was very wise. Hey, whadya know, life presented straight still provides plenty of humor. Ultimately the film is about the music, and T Bone Burnett's selection of songs is immaculate. Oscar Isaac, whose singing and playing were all shot live, gives something more than a fantastic character performance.

Told you you would love it.

THE IMMIGRANT 5/10

Marion Cotillard is above greatness in this one. Phoenix goes from great to amateurish, as usual. The script is strangely flawed here and there, but the main problem is that it's uninteresting and pointless to me.

Anyway, I kind of like the US poster (which is at least true to the film) and hate the french poster, which looks like a poster for the new Gatsby film:

USA:


FRANCE:

Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
moviesceleton
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3928


The glance that makes holes in the silver screen


View Profile
« Reply #12836 on: December 23, 2013, 03:08:31 PM »

Inside Llewyn Davis (2013) - 10/10. 4K. A flawless film. The Coens' decision to keep their satire machine turned off for this one was very wise. Hey, whadya know, life presented straight still provides plenty of humor. Ultimately the film is about the music, and T Bone Burnett's selection of songs is immaculate. Oscar Isaac, whose singing and playing were all shot live, gives something more than a fantastic character performance.
I'm not ready to announce it as a masterpiece yet, but I have to say I enjoyed watching it more than any other film this year. It's really fun to watch (I guess it's a example of what Tarantino calls hang out movies) and I'll be revisiting it for sure. I suppose my initial rating was 8/10 but when I now look back to it, I'm ready to bumb my rating. Not a 10/10 though.

« Last Edit: December 24, 2013, 08:18:27 AM by moviesceleton » Logged

"Once Upon a Time in America gets ten-minute ovation at Cannes"
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8447

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #12837 on: December 23, 2013, 10:05:40 PM »

DJ and I went to the Film Forum and saw the French movie THE PAST (2013). I give it a 7.5/10. Every single one of the performances was terrific. Berenice Bejo won Best Actress at Cannes for this

« Last Edit: December 24, 2013, 03:07:48 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12838 on: December 24, 2013, 07:13:41 AM »

I thought her performance was improving througough the movie. In the first scene I thought she wasn't very good, then she became better. They either shot it in the chronological order or I just understood the character better in the end. I would have to watch it again to be sure, but I doubt I'll ever do that. Like the previous film from this guy (A Separation), it's not really my kind of movie. It's quite well done with a couple really good scenes and some amazing performances, but the topic and the way it's treated is too bourgeois for me.

Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
moviesceleton
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3928


The glance that makes holes in the silver screen


View Profile
« Reply #12839 on: December 24, 2013, 08:31:44 AM »

I also saw The Past on Sunday. I'd rate it 7.5-8/10.  The Past has a good story but the execution could have been emotionally more engaging. The filmmakers did really nothing wrong, but the film just doesn't have that special something. Hence the 8ish rating. A Separation was a bit stronger. In my eyes, Farhadi is one of the most interesting new directors around.

Logged

"Once Upon a Time in America gets ten-minute ovation at Cannes"
Pages: 1 ... 854 855 [856] 857 858 ... 1170 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.071 seconds with 20 queries.