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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1764464 times)
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« Reply #13080 on: January 29, 2014, 04:32:57 AM »

Cause for Alarm! (1951) Loretta Young, Barry Sullivan, Bruce Cowling. From IMDb Invalid George Jones is both physically and mentally ill. He mistakenly believes his wife Ellen and his doctor are having an affair and also planning to kill him. He writes a letter to his lawyer (actually the DA) detailing their alleged murder plot. After he has Ellen give the letter to their postman, he reveals its contents to her and then threatens her with a gun. The excitement proves to much and George suffers a fatal collapse. Now Ellen must find a way to retrieve the incriminating letter. Café au lait Noir watchable 6.5/10

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« Reply #13081 on: January 29, 2014, 09:45:30 AM »

LUST FOR LIFE. The story of Vincent Van Gogh, as played by Kirk Douglas. I can't give this any more than a 7/10; it's not easy watching a nutjob get nuttier and nuttier. I'm not a Van Gogh fan (I have seen a few of his paintings, including The Starry Night and the portrait of the mailman at MoMA); I imagine that Van Gogh fans would enjoy it a lot more. (If only they'd make a movie about Edward Hopper..... ;-) Anthony Quinn has a great turn as Gaugin



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« Reply #13082 on: January 29, 2014, 10:39:25 AM »

LUST FOR LIFE. The story of Vincent Van Gogh, as played by Kirk Douglas. I can't give this any more than a 7/10; it's not easy watching a nutjob get nuttier and nuttier. I'm not a Van Gogh fan (I have seen a few of his paintings, including The Starry Night and the portrait of the mailman at MoMA); I imagine that Van Gogh fans would enjoy it a lot more.
Although it's only about the last month of the artist's life, Pialat's film Van Gogh (1991) is very good.

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« Reply #13083 on: January 29, 2014, 12:16:18 PM »

Are these films really accurate? Was Van Gogh poor all his life? In LUST FOR LIFE, I think they only mention one instance of a painting of his being sold. Did he really not sell many paintings during his life? In that case, I guess his brother Theo must have sold all those paintings after he died?.... Btw, from the moment Douglas's bandages were removed after he slashed his left ear - except for one medium shot - I don't think the movie ever shows a shot of him from the left side



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« Reply #13084 on: January 29, 2014, 12:55:41 PM »

Are these films really accurate? Was Van Gogh poor all his life? In LUST FOR LIFE, I think they only mention one instance of a painting of his being sold. Did he really not sell many paintings during his life? In that case, I guess his brother Theo must have sold all those paintings after he died?....
According to Wikipedia, his brother Theo died six months after Vincent did, so someone else sold the paintings. The irony is that in life Theo was an art dealer who sold paintings by just about everyone BUT Van Gogh. Either art buyers pre-1890 were incapable of seeing Van Gogh's brilliance, or Theo was the worst art dealer in history.

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« Reply #13085 on: January 30, 2014, 12:14:03 AM »

Walking outta the theater now after seeing AUGUST:OSAGE COUNTY. Meryl Streep plays a woman (who happens to be a cancer patient and a pill junkie) whose family comes together after her husband (an alcoholic) goes missing and is eventually found dead of suicide. So the insanely nutty dysfunctional family comes to Osage County and spends a few days together, cussing at each other and airing all the crazy ugly dirty grievances a dysfunctional family might have..... The acting is terrific all around (and there is not a word I can say about Streep that hasn't already been said), but this sort of story doesn't interest me at all. (maybe cuz I grew up in the most traditional, straight arrow family you can ever find) I just couldn't relate at all, these sorts of problems almost seem manufactured to me.... But i guess there are people for whom this is a reality

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« Reply #13086 on: January 30, 2014, 05:57:19 AM »

There are families with Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts as mother and daughter? That would be a cool family to grow up in but I fear not.

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« Reply #13087 on: January 30, 2014, 06:04:42 AM »

The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976/1978) - 10/10. As it turns out, he's not a bookie. He's not even Chinese, except ethnically. And he's certainly not an empire. He does get killed, though. And Cosmo Vittelli (Jackie Treehorn (Ben Gazzara)) is the man for the job. Only problem is, after the killing, Cosmo's new mob friends want to kill him! And what friends: Al Ruban, Seymour Cassel, Timothy Carey, Morgan Woodward--even Val Avery shows up for a scene. Meanwhile, back at Cosmo's club, the Crazy Horse West, the place is packed. But will Mr. Fascination be able to work through his conflicts with the strippers in time to put on a show? And doesn't the show represent in miniature the Cassavetes project as a whole? And if art is, by definition, what is exceptional in human endeavor, and life is what's common, where exactly is the frontier where the two meet? The search goes on.

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« Reply #13088 on: January 30, 2014, 12:21:01 PM »

Blue Valentine (2010) - 9/10

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« Reply #13089 on: January 30, 2014, 09:23:23 PM »

Blue Valentine (2010) - 9/10


SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS
that was a good movie (I saw it a few months ago, I probably gave it like an 8/10), but I didn't like that  there's really no explanation given for why Michelle Williams turns on Ryan Gosling. Things seem to be going fine, then the dog dies and they go to the hotel for the nite – sure, there are some things different about them, like how he gets the crappy motel and doesn't wash the paint from his hands and doesn't have the same aspirations in life as she does – but it's like, there was basically never a bad word between them until that one argument in the motel about their aspirations in life, and all of a sudden - BOOM, I never wanna see you again. Huh?

Roger Ebert alludes to this in the final 3 paragraphs of his review - the full review is here http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/blue-valentine-2011 - I'll cut and paste the final 3 paragraphs here



"Blue Valentine" moves between past and present as if trying to remember what went wrong. From Dean's point of view, maybe nothing did. He wanted to be married to Cindy, and he still does and he still is. Cindy can't stand that. He never signed off on the grow old along with me part. He doesn't think the best is yet to be. He thinks it's just fine now.

Williams plays Cindy as a woman who has lost her pride of body and self. No, she doesn't become a drunk — he's the one who drinks too much. But that's not the problem. It's his infuriating inability to care for this Cindy, right here, right now, because when she married him, she became exactly the Cindy he required.

I wonder what kind of script conferences (writer and director Derek) Cianfrance had with his co-writers, Joey Curtis and Cami Delavigne. They were writing about something ineffable, a void, a need. This wasn't a story with convenient hooks involving things like, you know, disease — things stories are familiar with. It was about inner defeat and the exhaustion of hope. I've read reviews saying Cianfrance isn't clear about what went wrong as they got from there to here. Is anybody?


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« Reply #13090 on: January 30, 2014, 11:33:11 PM »

Blue Valentine (2010) - 9/10


Really? Good. I think I'll end up giving it a shot...

If you liked the credits sequence: http://www.artofthetitle.com/title/blue-valentine/

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« Reply #13091 on: January 31, 2014, 12:58:00 AM »

SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS
that was a good movie (I saw it a few months ago, I probably gave it like an 8/10), but I didn't like that  there's really no explanation given for why Michelle Williams turns on Ryan Gosling. Things seem to be going fine, then the dog dies and they go to the hotel for the nite – sure, there are some things different about them, like how he gets the crappy motel and doesn't wash the paint from his hands and doesn't have the same aspirations in life as she does – but it's like, there was basically never a bad word between them until that one argument in the motel about their aspirations in life, and all of a sudden - BOOM, I never wanna see you again. Huh?
I don't think things seem to be going totally fine even before the dog dies. There's a certain tension between them. Probably not more than is usual for a couple that has been married for six years, but clearly they're not madly in love anymore. That is clear to me from the first ten minutes. AND the fact that the dog dying becomes such a big deal tells me that they clearly are not alright. And the incident at the grocery store. And the fact that Dean thinks they need to get a motel room, get drunk and fuck all night, which they obviously haven't done in ages. So in my eyes their argument in the motel room is believable.

To me it seems that you don't approve of how the plot is presented (their problems seem to come out of nowhere). I don't see Ebert sharing your point of view here. How I read him, he isn't criticizing the film at all - he merely states how it is. And actually he brings up its greatest virtue. Instead of telling us what went wrong, the film asks us: "What went wrong?"

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« Reply #13092 on: January 31, 2014, 02:51:32 AM »

I can't remember that I had any problems to understand what happens in Blue Valentine. This dog thing is only the occasion which makes a long grown tension visible. In real life an empty roll of toilet paper can be reason enough.

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« Reply #13093 on: January 31, 2014, 03:25:38 AM »

I don't think things seem to be going totally fine even before the dog dies. There's a certain tension between them. Probably not more than is usual for a couple that has been married for six years, but clearly they're not madly in love anymore. That is clear to me from the first ten minutes. AND the fact that the dog dying becomes such a big deal tells me that they clearly are not alright. And the incident at the grocery store. And the fact that Dean thinks they need to get a motel room, get drunk and fuck all night, which they obviously haven't done in ages. So in my eyes their argument in the motel room is believable.

To me it seems that you don't approve of how the plot is presented (their problems seem to come out of nowhere). I don't see Ebert sharing your point of view here. How I read him, he isn't criticizing the film at all - he merely states how it is. And actually he brings up its greatest virtue. Instead of telling us what went wrong, the film asks us: "What went wrong?"

Sorry for being unclear about Ebert – I was saying that Ebert alludes to the question, but that he isn't bothered by it, he doesn't think it's a problem.

 To me it was just so strange how she just says she is done with him, that came out of nowhere. I'm not saying that the fact that there is tension between them is not believable. I'm not saying the fact that they aren't as passionately in love as they once were is not believable. I'm just saying that to me, when she walks out on him (and it's FOR REAL, not just said in a brief moment of anger) that seems to come out of nowhere.

I guess the other viewpoint, which you and Ebert would subscribe to, is: By the time a relationship is doomed, you never really know how the problems started and what went wrong and why it went wrong and how it went wrong and what caused it to be over. All you know is, it IS over. By now, the how/why/when/what of (perhaps doesn't even matter, and in any case) can be very hard to remember; so that's the point of the flashbacks, to piece together what/when/how/why things started falling apart.

Here's something I never thought of till just now: When breakups happen, it's often over dumbass stuff or stuff you can't point to exactly or explain how/why, it's just something about the personalities don't work and one stops liking the other or whatever; it's not always something clear cut that someone can explain clearly like, "I broke up with him because of X." But in movies, I think there always IS a specific reason. (Often having something to do with infidelity, or maybe one spouse not spending enough time with the other, like in the case of showbiz people who who have to travel, etc.) So perhaps you can say that  Blue Valentine is being different, in that it's actually being more realistic, showing a breakup happening for reasons that aren't fully explained/understood, but more just a bunch of little, vague, subtle things put together that add up (along with perhaps many other unexplained/non-understood pieces) to the result that "This is over."

-------------------------------

I can't say I remember the movie scene for scene (( saw it at least six months ago, probably more), but as I recall, the flashback scenes show the couple meeting, being in love, etc.; the fighting only takes place in the current-day scenes, after they go to the motel... Where do you see in the flashback scenes that there is any tension? How is it clear to you from the first ten minutes that there is something wrong?

---------

RE: your comment about how the dog dying becomes such a big deal tell you "that they clearly are not alright" – (I never had any pets, but)  there are people who basically consider their pets to be part of their family; and they become disconsolate when their pet dies, shedding rivers of tears, being terribly sad for a long time.  Even more so considering that it wasn't an old/sick/dying dog, but a young healthy dog who was suddenly found dead.
and btw, in that scene where Gosling and Williams are crying after finding the dog (I don't remember if it's just before or just after they buried it)- there is no doubt that Gosling is really crying there. No phony glycerin tears; he is shedding streams of tears like a little baby. I'd like to know how he did that... you don't see him starting to cry; the scene begins as he is already in middle of crying, so he I bet he must have prepared somehow, maybe by reading really sad stories or watching sad videos (maybe of dog lovers telling stories about their dogs dying?) and got himself sad and started crying on camera, so the scene starts while he is in middle of crying...  Cry

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« Reply #13094 on: January 31, 2014, 04:20:10 PM »

I can't say I remember the movie scene for scene (( saw it at least six months ago, probably more), but as I recall, the flashback scenes show the couple meeting, being in love, etc.; the fighting only takes place in the current-day scenes, after they go to the motel... Where do you see in the flashback scenes that there is any tension? How is it clear to you from the first ten minutes that there is something wrong?
The flashbacks only show the good times. The first ten minutes take place in the present. It's basically just the couple doing ordinary stuff, but there are little glances and tones in their voices that imply something being a bit off.

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