Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 15, 2017, 02:58:11 PM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 880 881 [882] 883 884 ... 1170 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1838654 times)
moviesceleton
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3928


The glance that makes holes in the silver screen


View Profile
« Reply #13215 on: March 04, 2014, 05:11:19 PM »

First viewing? Amazing experience, isn't it? To me it's the perfect example of bad film full of genius ideas and some great execution. I'm really happy it exists and cannot wait to see it again but I would never advise it to anyone who's not working in the film industry.
The love hotel scene that ends with the intra-vaginal shot of a dick is utterly ridiculous, but they follow up with a touching and great birth scene in POV. The whole film is like that. It goes from empty to fascinating, ridiculous to genius. Looks like the first film of a genius teenager.
Yeah, that pretty much covers it. But instead of a genious teenager it's directed by a 45-year-old junkie.

Logged

"Once Upon a Time in America gets ten-minute ovation at Cannes"
PowerRR
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3008


View Profile
« Reply #13216 on: March 04, 2014, 06:01:00 PM »

The Quarrel - 4/10
Jew jew jew, yawn yawn yawn, holocaust, god, yawn, jews eating pastrami sandwiches

Logged
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #13217 on: March 05, 2014, 06:25:52 AM »

I kinda like to think of this movie as Red River with women instead of cattle. You know, Taylor goes all authoritarian, just like Wayne, etc. A women drive. I just love that  Grin
Well, there's no ambiguity in Taylor laying down the law. It's clear--especially after the one woman is raped--that things have to be his way or the highway. Of course, that just leads to the men taking off, and there's nothing he can do about it, so maybe the plan wasn't very realistic to begin with. But then, that's what keeps the plot ticking along.

Another thing that struck me: the 1951 audience would have been filled with women who, after the men went off to WWII, had had to work what were traditionally male jobs. So they would have easily identified with the pioneer women on the screen (played by their can-do contemporaries).

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #13218 on: March 05, 2014, 07:19:11 AM »

The Agony and the Ecstasy (1965) - 7/10. Blu-ray transfer: 10/10. Michelangelo (Charlton Heston) paints the Sistine Chapel while his patron, warrior-Pope Julius II (Rex Harrison), kibitzes. It's not actually about watching paint dry. It's more like watching people talking about watching paint dry. Still, Carol Reed's direction is terrific, the sets and locations are terrific, the costumes are fugetaboutit good, the Alex North score is better than fantastic, and the art (filmed in Todd AO!) is the greatest in the world. The drama is pretty much reduced to the tug-of-war between the two principals, and of course, since the two depend on each other and have a mutual grudging respect anyway, by the end its revealed we've been watching a buddy picture all along. But the spectacle! For a film about a painter, I don't know how anything grander could have been mounted. At the beginning of the film there's a narrated prologue that introduces the historical Michelangelo and gives us a tour of some of his famous sculptures. This is actually informative and a pleasure, and helps set some context for the film we're about to see. I've read a recent web post about this new Blu-ray release decrying the film's opening, claiming that it stops the story dead. The story hasn't even begun! And, since this was a roadshow release, with an intermission and exit music (but no overture), the prologue simply takes the place of the opening music. (Nothing "stops a story dead" like an overture, what?) Anyway, the new BD provides eye-candy for the ages--we're talking an LoA-level transfer. Anyone claiming to love art who doesn't already have a copy of this disc is a damned liar!

Serpico (1973) - 10/10. An undercover cop (Al Pacino) is frustrated in his attempts to report police corruption in NYC. This is the ultimate in gritty 70s filmmaking. No sets were used. All filming was done at locations in the five burroughs (Staten Island excluded; I'm not sure about Queens). The new BD transfer is very fine. Anyone claiming to love seeing NYC on film who doesn't already have a copy of this disc is a damned liar!

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8447

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #13219 on: March 05, 2014, 03:23:37 PM »

Serpico (1973) - 10/10. An undercover cop (Al Pacino) is frustrated in his attempts to report police corruption in NYC. This is the ultimate in gritty 70s filmmaking. No sets were used. All filming was done at locations in the five burroughs (Staten Island excluded; I'm not sure about Queens). The new BD transfer is very fine. Anyone claiming to love seeing NYC on film who doesn't already have a copy of this disc is a damned liar!

according to Wikipedia, all boroughs were used except Staten Island http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpico#Production

I am a huge fan of Sidney Lumet, but I didn't love this movie, largely for the same reason I didn't love Price of the City: the cast.
Lumet specifically decided to use no well-known actors in those films with the exception of Pacino in Serpico, who was well-known after The Godfather but not yet a major A-list star RE: POTC, he said he didn't want a big-name guy playing the lead cuz he did not want "to spend two reels getting over past associations."

Problem is, the cast in both films is, IMO, for the most part awful. There are two exceptions: great performances were delivered by Pacino in Serpico and Jerry Orbach in POTC (Orbach was not well known before POTC; but he was terrific in that movie, which introduced him to the world.) I definitely liked Serpico better than POTC, possibly cuz Serpico had a great lead. But I absolutely couldn't stand most of the cast in both movies.

The casting of these two movies is the only thing I can say I disagree with about the great Sidney Lumet. A great director. And a great interview subject, as well. Anytime you can, watch his interviews - whether on a DVD's bonus features, or on TCM, you can probably find stuff on YouTube. Listening to him is a joy.

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #13220 on: March 05, 2014, 03:41:07 PM »

I love the casts in both films. I think you're nuts.

Thanks for confirming that Queens locations were filmed for Serpico. I thought it likely but I couldn't tell for sure. It's fun to play I Know Where That Is while watching the movie. I'm pretty sure I spotted a location in Williamsburg in one shot, near where Sergio later filmed. I'll certainly be returning to Serpico to play the Locations Game in the future.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #13221 on: March 06, 2014, 06:17:27 AM »

Dead of Night (1945) 6/10. The classic supernatural portmanteau from Ealing. Five stories are linked with a frame story, and, as is par for the course, some of the stories are a lot better than others. The best is the justly famous one with Michael Redgrave as a ventriloquist with a creepy dummy. There is also a pretty effective tale about a haunted mirror, and a couple of very brief stories that don't amount to much. My favorite episode was the comical one: two golfers in love with the same woman play a round for the lady's hand; the loser then retires from the links and from life. But he soon comes back to haunt the winner. The golfers are played by Basil Radford and Naunton Wayne--Charters and Caldicott, together again for the first time!--and do their usual thing. The story is clever, too. I wish I could say that about the frame story that links everything together. The setting for the frame is an English country house where people who have gathered tell each other about their encounters with the supernatural. The pattern is the simple one where, as the character talks, we see the events they're describing in flashback. However, at the end of the picture, the main character has some kind of weird experience where all the flashbacks seem to collapse upon him. But this is cheating--the flashbacks are for us, the audience; the characters don't experience them as the stories are told, they just hear the stories. Why would the main character experience--and recognize--elements of the flashbacks that he has never seen? The tail-in-its-mouth ending is also predictable and unsatisfying. I guess a lot of anthology films descend from this one, though (to say nothing of anthology TV shows like The Twilight Zone).

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8447

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #13222 on: March 06, 2014, 01:53:57 PM »

Saw CASABLANCA again last nite, I'd dvr'd it when TCM recently showed it as part of its 31 DAYS OF OSCAR. God, I love this movie. I rarely watch even the best movies more than once in 2 years, but this is an exception: TCM probably shows CASABLANCA (and A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE) like 3 times a year, and I try not miss a showing. This one of those movies that when I watch it, I just wanna wrap my arms around the screen and hug it. The dialogue is second to none. The acting is incredible - with the exception of Paul Henreid, who is merely adequate, every single member of the cast, down to the smallest bit parts, is perfect. This is probably Bogie's greatest performance. There are probably more famous lines from this movie than any other. (AFI's 100 greatest quotes list thinks so, with 6 entries for CASABLANCA, next are GONE WITH THE WIND AND THE WIZARD OF OZ, with three http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AFI%27s_100_Years...100_Movie_Quotes ) The line OF ALL THE GIN JOINTS IN ALL THE TOWNS IN ALL THE WORLD, SHE WALKS INTO MINE is an all-time great....... THE GERMANS WORE GRAY, YOU WORE BLUE....The final scene on the runway, in the fog..... WE'LL ALWAYS HAVE CASABLANCA Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley

« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 05:01:47 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2988



View Profile
« Reply #13223 on: March 06, 2014, 02:53:55 PM »

How comes that Spanish people think that Casablanca makes promotion for the White House?

Logged

drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8447

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #13224 on: March 06, 2014, 05:04:11 PM »

How comes that Spanish people think that Casablanca makes promotion for the White House?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casablanca_%28film%29#Interpretation

------

unrelated question: Is Capt. Renault bisexual?

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
rexlic
Chicken Thief
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 37


View Profile
« Reply #13225 on: March 06, 2014, 09:29:01 PM »

I love the casts in both films. I think you're nuts.

Thanks for confirming that Queens locations were filmed for Serpico. I thought it likely but I couldn't tell for sure. It's fun to play I Know Where That Is while watching the movie. I'm pretty sure I spotted a location in Williamsburg in one shot, near where Sergio later filmed. I'll certainly be returning to Serpico to play the Locations Game in the future.


The scene where Pacino, on an elevated subway platform, spots a guy breaking into a place and gives chase, was shot at the Astoria-Ditmars Blvd. station, the last stop of the N and Q lines.  This is the same neighborhood where the scenes with the young Henry Hill in Goodfellas were done.  Two years ago, they tore down the building which housed the pizzeria he worked in with Tuddy; I almost cried.

Logged
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #13226 on: March 07, 2014, 06:19:44 AM »

The acting is incredible - with the exception of Paul Henreid, who is merely adequate
Here we have Ebert talking again. Henreid is as good as he can be considering his part--he's playing a saint. He can't have any failings, and failings are what make characters interesting. But he looks good and he commands respect. It is the effect the character has on those around him that counts.

Btw, I recently saw something where the lyrics to La Marseilles were subtitled. I'd never really understood the words before. I suddenly realized how clever the filmmakers were, because the song is not just the French national anthem, but a call to arms. The chorus goes like this:

Aux armes, citoyens,              To arms, citizens,
Formez vos bataillons,            Form your battalions,
Marchons, marchons !            Let's march, let's march!
Qu'un sang impur                  Let an impure blood
Abreuve nos sillons !              Water our furrows! (repeat)

The song goes on to warn that the failure to act will result in a return to "the old slavery." Every time I've seen that scene (the most stirring in the film, and one which occurs at the movie's exact mid-point) I've always read it as a simple appeal to patriotism. But the words are explicit. The Henreid character is inciting the crowd to direct action. Strasser is right to suddenly want him sidelined with extreme prejudice. And Henreid does a great job here--he really sells the idea that he is the Freedom Christ.

« Last Edit: March 08, 2014, 05:07:01 PM by dave jenkins » Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #13227 on: March 07, 2014, 06:28:37 AM »

Yep, our national anthem may not be the coolest sounding one, but it is quite badass.

Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8447

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #13228 on: March 07, 2014, 02:05:16 PM »

So once upon a time, the French actually used to believe in taking up arms?! My my, how far the weak have fallen........ My comment about Henreid had nothing to do with Ebert. (I don't even remember Ebert saying anything about him.) On the other hand, what I said about Renault being queer, THAT was Ebert. He got a lot of flak for saying that Renault was, how did he say it, "subtly homosexual" or something like that? I do agree with Ebert on that, there's at least one, possibly 2 comments by Renault that would indicate he prays at both churches: ASKING ABOUT YOU IN A WAY THAT MADE ME EXTREMELY JEALOUS is the one that's maybe; the more definite one is when describing Rick, he says, IF I WERE A WOMAN... BUT WHAT AM I DOING TALKING TO A BEAUTIFUL WOMAN ABOUT ANOTHER MAN....

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8447

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #13229 on: March 07, 2014, 02:09:25 PM »

RE: Henreid: when someone is a good actor and enjoyable to watch, they can be enjoyable no matter what their role is. Of course, the way their role is written has a huge effect on how good the performance can be, but someone like e.g. Bogie is enjoyable to watch ALWAYS. Problem for Henreid is that he is surrounded by perfection, which makes his adequacy seem terrible.

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Pages: 1 ... 880 881 [882] 883 884 ... 1170 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.046 seconds with 20 queries.