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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1842174 times)
dave jenkins
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« Reply #13470 on: April 24, 2014, 08:07:36 AM »

And btw, speaking of the lovely Ann Sheridan (who was my girlfriend in a previous life)... If she can't make a movie enjoyable, it must really suck  Wink
I love her in The Man Who Came to Dinner, which, btw, is based on the play by Hart and Kaufman.

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« Reply #13471 on: April 24, 2014, 08:09:47 AM »

if it looked so good that you wanted to sit through the whole movie, maybe it should be rated higher; isn't the look of a movie part of its rating? Shouldn't anything that makes a movie enjoyable or not enjoyable should be part of the rating? or are you saying it would have gotten a 0/10 without the nice-looking BRD?  Wink
No. This is a situation where the movie starts out at "1" and continues for a time at that, but you keep saying to yourself, it's just gotta get better. But it never does. And you don't know that until you go all the way through.

Needless to say, transfer notwithstanding, I don't ever want to watch this film again.

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« Reply #13472 on: April 24, 2014, 10:21:53 AM »

Your review is accurate as far as it goes--where's your comment on how funny the film is? What about the fact that Trier uses obvious rear projection for some spectacular artsy-fartsy effects, some incredibly hilarious ones? Why no mention that the whole film takes the piss out of certain genres and even cinema in general? I laugh my ass off every time I watch it. On the count of three you will return to your review and amend it. One: you are getting sleepy. Two (I say two!): you are passing back into the "review" state. Three: you awaken, typing. You are in rural New York state at the beginning of the 21st Century. You have come to guide men to fish. You are floating downstream. Soon you will be floating out to sea . . .

My "review" was copied verbatim from it's IMDb page, I didn't feel like writing anything original.  Undecided

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« Reply #13473 on: April 24, 2014, 01:06:02 PM »

The War Lord (1965) - 1/10. This film has one of the most beautiful transfers to Blu-ray I've ever seen. Unhappily, the movie is one of the worst I've ever had to sit through. Charlton Heston, Richard Boone, Maurice Evans and a cast of nobodies couldn't save this turkey. No one could: worst plot and dialogue I've endured for as long as I can remember. Thank you Franklin J Schaffner!

That's pretty strange. I saw it once, and that was many, many years ago. I can't remember anything bad in it. At least nothing really bad compared to typical Hollywood films. It was entertaining and not as simple as most films with knights.
Not a great film, but Schaffner was not a director for great films. This one was probably better than most of his others, at least better than his more famous stuff Patton, Papillon and that apish thing.

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« Reply #13474 on: April 24, 2014, 01:19:48 PM »

This one was probably better than most of his others, at least better than his more famous stuff Patton, Papillon and that apish thing.
Absolutely untrue.

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« Reply #13475 on: April 24, 2014, 01:28:34 PM »

Maybe, but these 3 are all less good than they should be.

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« Reply #13476 on: April 24, 2014, 01:33:08 PM »

Maybe, but The War Lord couldn't be any worse than it is.

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« Reply #13477 on: April 24, 2014, 01:42:42 PM »

Hmm, but I still can't believe that you rate it that low. Schaffner was a generally reliable director then, even his Tsar Trek film isn't that bad. It wasn't before the 80s that Schaffenr made some real stinkers.

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« Reply #13478 on: April 24, 2014, 05:09:34 PM »

The Boys from Brazil is pretty wretched.

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« Reply #13479 on: April 25, 2014, 05:37:59 AM »

Men in War (1957) - 8/10. Korea, 1950. Lt. Robert Ryan wakes up to discover positions have shifted in the night and his platoon is now behind enemy lines (hmmm, this seems to happen a lot in ground combat). With his vehicle out of commission and his commo down, he's got to get his boys back to battalion ASAP. And then Aldo Ray shows up, and its double the testosterone for the price! Ray has a jeep in which he's hauling Brian Keith's dad, Robert, a nearly comatose colonel. Ryan requisitions both men and materiel, beginning a running conflict with Ray that lasts most of the picture. Meanwhile, the enemy is everywhere, and attrition is taking its toll. Vic Morrow is along, but he's showing battle fatigue most of the time (he is able to snap out of it at the end for the big climax, though (huh?)). L.Q. Jones is there too, and he's great in a very, very small part. Of course, it all goes terribly Hollywood at the end when Ryan decides his boys have one final hill to take. Here, the enemy is being incredibly stupid. Fixed defensive positions, but no LP? And no one patrolling forward of the non-existent LP? Ryan and Co. are able to roll right up to the enemy and smoke 'em (literally, we get footage of some great flamethrower work). And then Robert Keith emerges from his coma just in time to get in on the final action (huh?). Still, as war films go this is pretty good. No big statements, just men doing dangerous jobs with intelligence and aplomb. And not infrequently Anthony Mann provides us with some very impressive cinematographic compositions of Men in War.

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« Reply #13480 on: April 25, 2014, 08:08:22 AM »

Duke tribute on TCM continues with THE SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS. I watched about 40 minutes before shutting it off, it wasn't interesting, but I am mentioning it cuz there is beautiful Technicolor in a 1941 film, you may never see a prettier use of color from that date. (Please don't utter the string of 4-letter words known as GONE WITH the WIND.) So, next time TCM plays it, you may wanna take a peek.

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« Reply #13481 on: April 25, 2014, 08:25:27 AM »

For you Peckinpah fans, if you have Encore Westerns channel, they'll be showing SAM PECKINPAH'S WEST: LEGACY OF A HOLLYWOOD RENEGADE on Sunday 4-27-14 at 7:05 AM EST

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« Reply #13482 on: April 25, 2014, 10:10:34 PM »

Rewatches of Cheyenne Autumn and Sergeant Rutledge and:

Pursued - 8/10 - Robert Mitchum plays a rancher tormented by a past he barely remembers, protected by adoptive mother Judith Anderson (yikes!), hated by his surrogate brother (some loser) and loved by Theresa Wright. The story's a bit silly, with character motivations changing at the drop of a hat and an overly-convenient ending. The main reason to watch is James Wong Howe's master class in cinematography: amazing mood, lighting and depth of field both in-doors (dig that deep focus) and outdoors. The scene where an assassin stalks Mitchum from a mile back is especially remarkable.

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« Reply #13483 on: April 26, 2014, 01:33:53 PM »

The Pawnbroker (1964) - 5/10. Rod Steiger gives an impressive performance as the title character, a Jewish concentration camp survivor who, deadened by his experience, lives now only for money. People are constantly reaching out to him, but he always refuses to take their hand (in one scene with a very frumpy Geraldine Fitzgerald, literally). If the film had only been about that it probably could have been one of the greatest films on the subject of survivor's guilt. Instead, the film piles on additional narrative material from, seemingly, other films. It turns out his Manhattan pawnbroking business (Park Ave. and E. 116th/Harlem) is really a front. The shop doesn't actually make any money (!), it's just a way to launder funds for Mr. Big (Brock Peters). Late in the film, Steiger is shocked, shocked to discover that the money he's paid comes from such unsavory activities as prostitution. This is particularly galling because, we discover in flashbacks, the pawnbroker's late wife was prostituted by the Nazis. Steiger then tries to get out from under, but he discovers he's in too deep and, anyway, his will was broken long ago. If that weren't enough, there's also a group of punks who are planning to knock off the pawnshop (huh? Don't they know it's a front? Won't they be bringing down the wrath of Mr. Big on their heads if they succeed?). Then there's the young PR kid who's working as the pawnbroker's assistant. Will he decide to betray his employer in order to get a taste of the good life?  Huh, what happened to our film about a bitter death camp survivor?

As you see, the film (and maybe the underlying source novel) tried to get too much into the story. The focus is constantly shifting, and by the end I wasn't completely sure what the film was about. There are, however, still some very nice things about the film: as previously mentioned, Steiger's performance; beautiful b&w widescreen photography of Manhattan locations circa 1962; those locations themselves, many of which no longer exist. There's an elevated train line running along Park Ave. in front of the pawnbroker's shop, and it had me stumped for a while, but a visit to IMDb provided this explanation:
Quote
At the time this was filmed, the EL was the elevated tracks of the New York Central Railroad over Park ave. with trackage rights granted to the New Haven Railroad for access into Grand Central Station. In 1968 it became Penn Central and in 1976 Conrail. The Line was purchased by the state of NY-MTA on 1/1/1983 and became Metro North Railroad. By the early 1990's the viaduct was in such bad shape the MTA tore down one entire section at a time by Track (4 tracks) and rebuilt the entire stucture. So the EL seen in the this film no longer exists as it did in 1964 having been totaly rebuilt.

That poster seems to know what he's talking about (and, as a frequent Metro North user myself, I found the info particularly interesting). A shame the film isn't better than it is, but Olive's new Blu-ray transfer is so impressive, I probably have to re-watch it several times to experience again the Manhattan of 50 years ago.

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« Reply #13484 on: April 26, 2014, 04:31:04 PM »

Masques (1987) - 6/10. One of Chabrol's potboilers. Philippe Noiret is a successful game show host on French TV (a horrible show where old people sing and dance--noodles_leone knows the type). During a brief hiatus, Noiret invites the young journalist writing his biography to his country house where they can work on the book together. The writer has some other agenda, however, or else why would he be carrying a gun? At the house there are a number of people already--Noiret's masseuse and her husband, Noiret's driver, a mysterious "god daughter" who keeps to her room (a pre-Cyrano Anne Brouchet), and a woman attendant (whose incessant smile really starts getting on your nerves after a while). All here is not as it seems, and soon a game of cat-and-mouse begins between Noiret and the young man. This is well done, and the movie is enjoyable for as long as things remain opaque. But once everybody puts their cards on the table the whole thing becomes rather pedestrian. Throughout, however, Noiret plays his part as the affable swine to perfection, and his performance is the reason to watch the film.

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