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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1763099 times)
dave jenkins
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« Reply #13695 on: July 12, 2014, 10:36:57 AM »

Dude, yer missin' out on the noir festival!  Shocked (started last night). Today we've got Blind Spot and In a Lonely Place (w/ intro by Eddie).

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« Reply #13696 on: July 12, 2014, 10:20:53 PM »

ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 (the John Carpenter one)
6/10

The techno music is stupid. As is the "something to do with death" reference. A priest would say that to a kid? A References has to be done WELL, in a context that makes sense (like they were in OUATITW), not stuck in there stupidly just for the sake of being stuck in there.

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« Reply #13697 on: July 13, 2014, 06:03:36 AM »

PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK (reneted the Criterion blu-ray from Netflix)
7.5/10

Miranda is one of the most visually striking movie characters ever. Heck, she is one of the most visually striking movie images ever, period.
The movie itself is incredibly beautiful, lotsa shots look inspired by paintings; Weir says he was inspired by an early French color photographer.

I skipped around among the bonus features, saw most of them. One absolute must is the feature entitled "Peter Weir," a 25-minute piece of Weir discussing the film in 2003.

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« Reply #13698 on: July 13, 2014, 06:11:56 AM »

Quote
The movie itself is incredibly beautiful, lotsa shots look inspired by paintings; Weir says he was inspired by an early French color photographer.

Joan Lindsay wrote about William Ford's painting At the Hanging Rock inspiring her to write the novel. No doubt Weir was familiar with it too:

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« Reply #13699 on: July 13, 2014, 06:18:27 AM »

Works better as an almost abstract movie about signs. The film isn't just the investigation, it's a ballet of nonsensiqual clues and paradoxal leads. The police and journalists are struggling with a language that only the Zodiac and Gyllenhaal speak. They're the only characters who barely age, by the way, as if they were eveolving into another dimension. To me, it's a 9/10 that gets better with each viewing. I can understand it doesn't resonate this way for other viewers though.

Very well-said. Besides this and the visual aspect, I like Fincher's jumping switching gears throughout the movie. It starts out as a crime drama/borderline horror movie, then a police procedural, then transmogrifies into something much more original and unsettling. Offhand, I can't think of a movie that even attempts this, let alone pulls it off so seamlessly.

I don't mind the talky aspect which Movies discusses. Few of the dialogue scenes are long or drawn out so it's not a filmed play; Fincher has to convey a lot of information and does much of it through montage and brief snippets. It reminds of me All the President's Men or Day of the Jackal, which requires heavy exposition but deliver them in succinct, easily digestible packets of information.

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« Reply #13700 on: July 13, 2014, 06:26:36 AM »

Been busy lately with work and other things, so I won't account for everything I've watched. Let's stick with the ones I've watched in the past week.

Lady Caroline Lamb - 4/10 - Robert Bolt's sole directorial effort, chronicling the title character's affair with Lord Byron (Richard Chamberlain!). An utterly wretched movie: badly paced, clunkily written, historically inaccurate, indifferently photographed, and a terrible performance by Sarah Miles. Jon Finch does great work, Laurence Olivier has a fun cameo and Richard Rodney Bennett's score is lovely, so it gets a few pity points. Otherwise, this was even worse than I'd been expecting.

The Great Escape - 8/10 - 2nd viewing.

The Bofors Gun - 6/10 - Middling military drama about a British Corporal (David Warner), on his last night before officer training, botching a routine guard assignment thanks to insane private Nicol Williamson. Sort of an enlisted man's Tunes of Glory, but without the stakes or depth to make it really compelling. Warner and Williamson do great work though, and there's a nice early role for Ian Holm.

Women in Love - 9/10 - One of the best classic lit adaptations I've encountered. Ken Russell seems determined to undercut the genre-mandated handsomeness: ragged editing, dizzying close-ups, bizarre, almost off-hand staging of key set pieces, monstrously unerotic sex. Glenda Jackson's rapidly becoming one of my favorite actresses; Oliver Reed has never mumbled better; Jennie Linden does well in a less defined role. Only Alan Bates disappoints; his character's less well-developed than his costars, reducing to spouting fruity aphorisms. Nice to see Vladek Sheybal and Michael Gough in supporting roles.

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« Reply #13701 on: July 13, 2014, 06:45:46 AM »

Groggy: despite being busy with work and other things, you have time to spend hours watching movies, but don't have the time to spend a few minutes writing about them? Shame on you

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« Reply #13702 on: July 13, 2014, 06:48:53 AM »

I know, I'm a failure.

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« Reply #13703 on: July 13, 2014, 11:51:42 AM »

It reminds of me All the President's Men or Day of the Jackal, which requires heavy exposition but deliver them in succinct, easily digestible packets of information.

 Afro

Boyhood (2014) - 9/10. An impressive achievement, and highly entertaining.

Hum. You sound like the point of the movie is the achievement, and the rest is good quality, nothing more.

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« Reply #13704 on: July 13, 2014, 11:58:49 AM »

PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK (reneted the Criterion blu-ray from Netflix)
7.5/10

The movie itself is incredibly beautiful, lotsa shots look inspired by paintings; Weir says he was inspired by an early French color photographer.

Joan Lindsay wrote about William Ford's painting At the Hanging Rock inspiring her to write the novel. No doubt Weir was familiar with it too:


I always think about Monet when talking about this movie, especially those two paintings from the Musée d'Orsay in Paris:




You'll find other images with a similar atmosphere here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Monet

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« Reply #13705 on: July 13, 2014, 01:49:59 PM »

Nice. Afro

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« Reply #13706 on: July 13, 2014, 02:34:31 PM »

Blind Spot (1947) - 6/10. 35mm. Chester Morris doing a very credible Scott Brady impression (ha!). Morris is supposed to be a talented novelist whose books, although artistically successful, don't sell. Needing money, and needing courage to ask his publisher for an advance, he gets tanked up and goes to the publisher's office. There he meets Constance Dowling, secretary and bottle blonde. Dowling doesn't want to let Morris in to see the boss, but he charges past her. Inside the publisher is doing some serious putting with Steven Geray, a financially successful writer of mysteries. The publisher wants to send Morris packing, but Geray asks him to be patient when Morris claims to have a great idea for a locked-room mystery. Maybe on the strength of that idea Morris can get an advance? Yeah, maybe, but Morris is so drunk he may not be able to stay coherent. There is an ellipsis. Later, the publisher turns up dead . . . in his office, which was bolted shut from the inside. Morris turns up hungover . . . and claiming to have blacked out everything that happened the previous afternoon. Of course, the police think Morris did the murder. Morris doesn't know whether he did it or not. But if not him, who? And what was the clever solution to the locked-room mystery he concocted while drunk that he can't remember now? This is a great, great premise.

Unhappily, the way the film unspools from there leaves a lot to be desired.

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« Reply #13707 on: July 13, 2014, 03:17:07 PM »

Vámonos con Pancho Villa! (Let's Go with Pancho Villa) (1936) "Los Leones de San Pablo", six men from San Pablo decide to join Pancho Villa's army the fates are varied, Mexican "Zapata" Western all shot on location in Spanish with English subtitles, 7/10 from Netflix.

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« Reply #13708 on: July 13, 2014, 05:38:46 PM »

RE: PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK:

If you have the Criterion BRD, look at the shot that lasts from 20:19-20:23. That one in particular absolutely looks like it was inspired by a painting

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« Reply #13709 on: July 13, 2014, 08:22:44 PM »

someone posted on YouTube what he says was the original ending of Picnic at Hanging Rock https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hChZEMQXFg

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I did not agree with all the musical selections for this film. Yeah, Zamfir's pan pipes are nice at times, and some of the other musical selections are nice, but some are just really weird. Yeah, you can say maybe it was meant to be unsettling or whatever, but I just very often found myself shaking my head at the music.

Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-Flat, "Emperor Concerto" – whose second movement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbrBQwRmd2I is one of the pieces of music in this movie – is one of my favorite pieces of music ever written, but I wasn't sure it really fit with the movie (and I didn't like the tempo of this version either.)

An interesting note about Zamfir - Weir says that when he approached Zamfir to score the movie, Zamfir wasn't interested, so instead, I think Weir took a piece of music Zamfir had already recorded, not sure if it was already released on record, and used it for the score.

------

another interesting note the cinematographer said: in order to get a sorta unsettling feeling, he sometimes used an almost imperceptible slo-mo: on a closeup shot, in which he asked the actress not to blink, and he made sure there was no wind blowing hair or anything like that, but he would roll the camera at like 50 fps - the fact that there was no blinking and no wind give no obvious signs to the viewer that it is slo-mo, but he felt that it would sorta add to the unsettling feeling.

---

SPOILER ALERT

Also, Weir says that when he went to meet Joan Lindsey, the author, one question he was told not to ask her was whether the story was true. he asked anyway, and she said he should never ask again. So he never got an answer. Weir says that after the film was released, journalists did investigations into historical records, and could find no record of such an event. However, Weir says he believes that Lindsey did base the event some event that did happen and profoundly affect her. It was not exactly as in the book – and that's presumably why journalists found no record of it – but he believes that there was some sort of event where girls went missing on a school picnic that profoundly affected Lindsay.

I never read the book, but – assuming the movie closely follows the book – I assume it is a true story because it's kinda weird how one girl, Irma, is found, but no trace is ever found of the others. If it was pure fiction, you would assume that there would be a solution to the mystery; barring that, you would assume that either all would be found or none would be found. Having one girl found – alive, but with no memory of what happened?! – and the others disappear without a trace seems kinda too strange for fiction.

Also, Weir says that he thought viewers would be upset that there is no solution (as indeed many were) so that's why they came up with the idea of having that note in the beginning saying that there was a picnic and some of them disappeared without a trace, to let the viewer know right away, don't expect any solution. Personally, I wasn't expecting a solution – not only had I read the title card, but I think I had also read the plot synopsis on IMDB before seeing the movie – so this is the one instance where knowing what happens kinda helped. Cuz I think that if I had been expecting a solution but never gotten it, I would have also been disappointed. But knowing there would be no solution, tells you right away that this movie, though it may be called a Mystery, is not the sort of movie where the "What happens" matters.

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Anyway, I'll reiterate one final time: if you have the Criterion, watch that 25-minute piece entitled "Peter Weir," it is full of good stuff about the movie  Smiley

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