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Dust Devil
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« Reply #14850 on: February 28, 2015, 12:17:42 PM »

Turks & Caicos (2014) - 6.5/10

A decently flowing non-original agent flick. I might watch the others in the series too.

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« Reply #14851 on: February 28, 2015, 12:27:19 PM »

Dallas Buyers Club (2013) - 7.5/10

I think it's too fast and episodic to be great, even with MM's great performance.

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« Reply #14852 on: February 28, 2015, 02:15:34 PM »

Well, that and it's not very good.

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« Reply #14853 on: February 28, 2015, 07:14:41 PM »

Whiplash again - just see the movie ya assholes

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« Reply #14854 on: March 01, 2015, 01:52:46 AM »

Haha I don't know why they're ignoring it.

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« Reply #14855 on: March 01, 2015, 04:09:58 AM »

I saw it. 6.5/10. The climax is better than the rest of the film together. Formulaic screenwriting, nothing special acting-wise, not nearly as original visually as it tries to be.

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« Reply #14856 on: March 01, 2015, 09:11:10 AM »

I saw it. 6.5/10. The climax is better than the rest of the film together. Formulaic screenwriting, nothing special acting-wise, not nearly as original visually as it tries to be.

I don't think it's trying to be original. They're using Scorsese effects 100% of the time. I don't get the Fincher feel many critics have pinpointed (the break up scene was heavily influenced by The Social Network but only the way it was written, not shot). It's pure young Marty all over the place.

The revolution is that it's the first movie that focuses on what it is to work hard at something. No more of the bullshit Hollywood gives us in every biopic. You don't become Charlie Parker by being gifted or by having a brother who died in front of you. You try by working really, really hard. The rest is bullshit people who never worked hard imagine to feel better about themself.

It touches me on a very deep level.

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« Reply #14857 on: March 01, 2015, 09:43:32 AM »

Hitler: The Last Ten Days - 6/10 - Workmanlike film about the end of Nazi Germany can't help being in the shadow of Downfall, further hurt by overuse of stock footage. Alec Guinness makes a surprisingly good Hitler; the other cast is unmemorable.

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« Reply #14858 on: March 01, 2015, 01:46:34 PM »

I don't think it's trying to be original. They're using Scorsese effects 100% of the time. I don't get the Fincher feel many critics have pinpointed (the break up scene was heavily influenced by The Social Network but only the way it was written, not shot). It's pure young Marty all over the place.

The revolution is that it's the first movie that focuses on what it is to work hard at something. No more of the bullshit Hollywood gives us in every biopic. You don't become Charlie Parker by being gifted or by having a brother who died in front of you. You try by working really, really hard. The rest is bullshit people who never worked hard imagine to feel better about themself.

It touches me on a very deep level.
Yeah, I got the Scorsese feeling too. Maybe even too much. Influence turned into imitation. And I didn't really mean "original". I guess "special" is the word I was after.

The morale of the story is actually what bugs me the most about the movie. For a good while they kept the "being the greatest drummer of all is not worth sacrificing your love and family" card in the game. And while it certainly was surprising they didn't play that card in the end, it makes the message rather dubious. As I see it, at the end of the film the drummer kid is headed for the same destiny as the sax (or trumpet?) player we never see on screen: a burn-out and, eventually, premature death. So, "brightest candle burns quickest" is supposed to be a positive notion? I understand that the views of the protagonist are not necessarily the same as the filmmaker's, but in this case this really seemed to me like the point the director was trying to make. If I'm misreading the film, please inform me because I really hope I am.

On a related note, the way music was portrayed as a an exact science or a race (against others and oneself) seemed also very wrong to me. In the film, drumming is interchangeable with, say, chess, javelin throw or a spelling bee. Any of those would fit in the same story  (although with chess it might make a rather boring film). Portraying art as a contest seems repulsive to me. I understand the world of performing arts is highly competitive, but making the competition the heart of the art is plain wrong. And I guess it's needless to say that I find "being one of the greats" an immensely juvenile goal in life (although I can certainly see the appeal of it).

I respect the point you make about the film defending hard work over "talent", but frankly that wasn't what I was thinking while watching the film.

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« Reply #14859 on: March 01, 2015, 03:28:49 PM »

Alert: SPOILERS ALL OVER THE PLACE. GO WATCH WHIPLASH.

Yeah, I got the Scorsese feeling too. Maybe even too much. Influence turned into imitation. And I didn't really mean "original". I guess "special" is the word I was after.

The guy is young and the budget is ridiculously low... I agree, less Marty would help the movie stand on his own but in the end what matters the most is how the way he shot it helps the story. IMO it does more than the job. And the job was incredibly tough:

1) showing somebody at work
2) showing music sequences as action sequences

The morale of the story is actually what bugs me the most about the movie. For a good while they kept the "being the greatest drummer of all is not worth sacrificing your love and family" card in the game. And while it certainly was surprising they didn't play that card in the end, it makes the message rather dubious. As I see it, at the end of the film the drummer kid is headed for the same destiny as the sax (or trumpet?) player we never see on screen: a burn-out and, eventually, premature death. So, "brightest candle burns quickest" is supposed to be a positive notion? I understand that the views of the protagonist are not necessarily the same as the filmmaker's, but in this case this really seemed to me like the point the director was trying to make. If I'm misreading the film, please inform me because I really hope I am.

I think you are. As a matter of fact, the filmmaker was a drummer and had a teacher similar to the one in the story (and yes he got into a car accident before a gig, although not on the very day of the gig). He obviously never became the "Bird" drummer of this generation so you can assume he doesn't fully agree with the teacher. Still, that doesn't mean the teacher is all wrong. His "good job" speech is pretty convincing and I think the filmmaker agrees here. I certainly do.

The premature death is definitely a very negative notion in the film. It's a way to say "don't do what that teacher does". Also, I'm not sure that sax or trumpet kid really became a good player. We get that information when the teacher tells his students about him. And we know for a fact that he lies about many things at this moment. It doesn't change anything but still. Don't believe that crazy asshole. He's a movie character: by definition he goes way too far. If he didn't who would watch such a boring story?

On a related note, the way music was portrayed as a an exact science or a race (against others and oneself) seemed also very wrong to me. In the film, drumming is interchangeable with, say, chess, javelin throw or a spelling bee. Any of those would fit in the same story  (although with chess it might make a rather boring film). Portraying art as a contest seems repulsive to me. I understand the world of performing arts is highly competitive, but making the competition the heart of the art is plain wrong.

In a way, it is an exact science. Like any kind of art. It doesn't mean that it's just that but a part of art is very very exact science. Is it 1%? 10%? 99%? It's up to you. I'd say about 75% myself, but I'm a crazy Cartesian so I'm probably overrating it. That being said, nobody will ever convince me it's too much under 50% because I don't believe in magic.

And yes, it is a race because it's competitive. It's not only that (a science and a race) but that's the part the movie focuses on. You'll remember, however, that the final is way above this. That's when the teacher cannot help anymore, he becomes useless: when the drummer goes into a great improvisation that has nothing to do with the "scientific" skills he learned. Hard work only made him free. And at this point only it becomes art (because, I'm sorry but Caravan an Whiplash are not art to me, it's elevator music).

And I guess it's needless to say that I find "being one of the greats" an immensely juvenile goal in life (although I can certainly see the appeal of it).

It certainly is Smiley
This kind of ego/hubris stories like Whiplash, Casino and many others are about juvenile characters. From a personal standpoint I'd advise these guys to focus on doing great things instead of being great. But in the end, I don't care as long as they manage to do great stuff.

I respect the point you make about the film defending hard work over "talent", but frankly that wasn't what I was thinking while watching the film.

That's what kept me going for the whole movie (far more than the relationship between the two guys, although that's clearly the main point of the movie). I know what it is to work hard, I know it's the way to do great things and I could relate to that. On the other hand as soon as I got out of the theater I hated myself for being such a lazy bastard compared to the guy in the film Grin

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« Reply #14860 on: March 01, 2015, 04:39:51 PM »

Alert: SPOILERS ALL OVER THE PLACE. GO WATCH WHIPLASH.



Why don't you just make a thread for Whiplash and then you can stop with all the spoiler alerts in the RTLMYS thread  Wink

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« Reply #14861 on: March 01, 2015, 05:40:07 PM »

I'll do it when over 4 people on this board aknowledge the existence of what may be the best movie of 2014   Angry

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« Reply #14862 on: March 01, 2015, 07:39:08 PM »

I'll do it when over 4 people on this board aknowledge the existence of what may be the best movie of 2014   Angry
HEEEY NOW, it was GOOOOD, lets not get ahead of ourselves ...Boyhood, Inherent Vice, Gone Girl, probably American Sniper ...all better IMO.

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« Reply #14863 on: March 02, 2015, 03:33:38 AM »

Forget Whiplash get Hit Me (1996) you can pick it up $0.01 used & new on Amazon for basically the price of the shipping. It's a great Neo Noir Afro Afro Afro Afro.

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« Reply #14864 on: March 02, 2015, 03:57:39 AM »

The Nickel Ride (1974) Wow, another great Neo Noir set in LA, this stars Jason Miller as Cooper one time carny now crime fence, who is practically a double for Charles McGraw without the gravelly voice, there are some great believable performances here from Victor French (who you wont recognize), Linda Haynes, John Hillerman, and Bo Hopkins. This film builds  slowly in tension much like Night And The City does. Nice on location 70s LA.   

NYT summary review: The events leading up to the death of a small-time Los Angeles hood provides the basis of this gripping crime drama. The doomed gangster is known as the "key man" because he manages several warehouses containing oodles of pilfered loot. They mobsters have stolen so much that they are running out of space and so desperately need more storage units. They send the fellow out to negotiate for more space, but this takes time. His boss gets nervous and believing the big-hearted "key man" to be more of a risk than an asset orders him carefully watched and ultimately destroyed. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

and

Excellent and underrated 70's crime noir sleeper

Author: Woodyanders (Woodyanders@aol.com) from The Last New Jersey Drive-In on the Left
6 January 2012
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Small-time criminal Cooper (a terrifically intense, restrained, and riveting performance by Jason Miller) manages several warehouses in Los Angeles that the mob uses to store their stolen goods. Known as "the key man" for the key chain he always has on him that can unlock all the warehouses, Cooper is assigned by the local syndicate to negotiate a deal for a new warehouse because the mob has run out of storage space. However, Cooper's superior Carl (a splendidly smooth and dapper turn by John Hillerman) gets nervous and decides to have cocky cowboy button man Turner (marvelously played with swaggering bravado and rip-snorting vitality by Bo Hopkins) keep an eye on Cooper. Director Robert Mulligan, working from a vivid and involving script by Eric Roth, astutely nails the nerve-wracking pressure of eking out a living through illegal means, makes fine use of the gritty urban locations, presents a neat array of colorful, interesting, and totally believable characters, effectively creates and sustains a grim tone throughout, and depicts a harsh and realistic criminal underworld in an admirably stark and unsentimental manner. Miller completely pegs the pain and anguish of a weary and aging bottom man on the totem pole who's in over his head and saddled with more responsibility than he can easily handle; he receives bang-up support from Linda Haynes as Cooper's loyal and concerned ex-dancer girlfriend Sarah, Victor French as hearty and gregarious bar owner Paddie, Richard Evans as obnoxious flunky Bobby, Bart Burns as slippery middle man Elias, and Lou Frizzel as amiable lug Paulie. Jordan Cronenworth's crisp and lively widescreen cinematography offers a wealth of stunning visuals and gives the picture an extra kinetic buzz. Dave Grusin's spare moody score likewise does the brooding trick. The downbeat ending packs a devastating punch. A real sleeper.


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