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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1770375 times)
drinkanddestroy
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« Reply #16260 on: September 02, 2016, 12:36:37 AM »

Just saw this on TCM; I give it a 7.5/10

For those who can't get enough of Erich von Stroeheim as the German officer in GRAND ILLUSION, you can feed your habit by also watching FIVE GRAVES TO CAIRO. Reworking of an old play, updated to be about WW2.

I liked Franchot Tone here (if you can accept him playing a Brit with American accent). Baxter does a nice French accent. I also remember her doing a good Mexican accent in a weird movie called something like WALK ON THE WILD SIDE, so she was good with these accents.

I disagree with what you said about speechmaking. Maybe I am erong, but I only recall one speech about facsism vs. freedom. I can deal with one speech like that.

Also, I disagree with you on the ending, I think it is pretty good

SPOILER ALERT FOR REST OF POST

Baxter is a sacrifice, in war there aren't any real "happy endings." In order for the war to be won and freedom to prosper, a lot of people had to die, and I think that in any good war movie, there have to be important people dying. I think this ending is good - she makes the ultimate sacrifice, Tone visits her grave and then he is called away to fight.

Saw this again on TCM; I REALLY like this movie. I give it a 9/10.

I just ordered the DVD - actually a DVD-R - from Amazon.


Von Stroeheim here is every bit as great as in GRAND ILLUSION and SUNSET BLVD. Franchot Tone I usually do not like very much; here, he was tolerable. The weakest link in an otherwise great cast. Von Stroeheim, Baxter, Tamiroff, and whoever plays the German Lieutenant. Very good performances. Terrific movie. This seems to get lost among all the great titles in Wilder's ouevre. Maybe it isn't as great as DOUBLE INDEMNITY, but this is a damn good movie  Afro Afro Afro

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« Reply #16261 on: September 02, 2016, 03:39:56 AM »

Just ordered this based on your comments. I still haven't read In The Blink of An Eye.

Would you recommend watching English Patient first? Also, I haven't seen Apocalypse Now or The Godfathers in ages... does the book go in specific enough detail for me to rewatch? I remember all the core scenes.

Murch didn't actually edit the first 2 godfathers though, right? just sound editing?

1 - I haven't read The Blink of en Eye yet but I bought it the same day I bought The Conversations.
2 - I would recommend watching the English Patient first (by the way, it's very cheap on iTunes and probably any VoD service right now in France, i got it for $5). It's not essential as they explain everything very well in the book and you can understand the concepts without knowing the material... but it's filled with spoilers.
3 - You don't need to watch these films again: they explain everything you need to know. Of course, you're supposed to know what they're talking about when they mention the subway sound during Michael's murder in Godfather 1, or the door closing on Kay in the end... but they even explain that. If anything, reading the Conversations made me want to watch all of them because I feel like I would enjoy them even more now (just like my enjoyment of the english patient was probably enhanced by having read the book). I think he only did sound editing of the first 2 godfathers. He also only edited some parts of the theatrical version of Apocalypse Now and then finished the whole thing... but he was the main editor of the redux version. In the end, his particular role on the movies he talks about isn't that important. As the book states at some point, he's more like a "fellow filmmaker" on every project he works on: he has a clear vision of the whole film as well as the ability to notice and monitor tiny details. So he's always insightful (even if he's not always right, of course).

He also worked on the new version of Touch Of Evil: they re-edited the film based on a 50 pages memo Orson Wells wrote after being fired from the movie and saw the new edit (including scenes that he hadn't shot or written) only once. I'm not sure at all which version I saw myself.

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« Reply #16262 on: September 02, 2016, 05:47:11 AM »

Yes he gave more than his blessing. From The Conversations, he was actually even admirative of the adaptation work.

Will you read it?

I think I will.

Editing is underrated in the appreciation of films anyway.

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« Reply #16263 on: September 02, 2016, 06:29:09 AM »

Editing is underrated in the appreciation of films anyway.

Good.

I think it's impossible to know what part of what you see is actually done through editing. Acting, writing and directing are constantly and invisibly enhanced and/or destroyed by editing. So editing will always be underrated.

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« Reply #16264 on: September 02, 2016, 11:24:53 AM »

I think it's impossible to know what part of what you see is actually done through editing. Acting, writing and directing are constantly and invisibly enhanced and/or destroyed by editing. So editing will always be underrated.

I think you could often make that case for "continuity editing" which is essentially supposed to be imperceptible, although of course not upon closer examination. However, "montage editing" (most famous for the jump cut) is done for specific and noticeable effect to attract the attention of even the most casual viewer.

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« Reply #16265 on: September 02, 2016, 01:02:29 PM »

Recommended is also Selected Takes - Film Editors on Editing

Interviews with 21 Hollywood editors by Vincent LoBrutto. The book is from 1991 and the interviewees range from old studio editors, who started working in the 30s, to ones which were then still in the business. Amongst them Dede Allen (hello Novecento) and Lou Lombardo.


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« Reply #16266 on: September 02, 2016, 02:31:29 PM »

I think you could often make that case for "continuity editing" which is essentially supposed to be imperceptible, although of course not upon closer examination. However, "montage editing" (most famous for the jump cut) is done for specific and noticeable effect to attract the attention of even the most casual viewer.

Yes but the bunch of editing is much more that that. It's about choosing the right take, rearranging the decoupage, finding the right pace, cutting before or after a blink... and finding treasures in moments that weren't even supposed to be filmed, right before "action" and right after "cut". These things are impossible to know if you haven't seen the rushes. I mean, of course, if the job isn't terribly done: a terrible job is always noticeable.

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« Reply #16267 on: September 02, 2016, 04:04:21 PM »

... Amongst them Dede Allen (hello Novecento) and Lou Lombardo.

Yes, I have that book - it's a good one.

Yes but the bunch of editing is much more that that. It's about choosing the right take, rearranging the decoupage, finding the right pace, cutting before or after a blink... and finding treasures in moments that weren't even supposed to be filmed, right before "action" and right after "cut". These things are impossible to know if you haven't seen the rushes. I mean, of course, if the job isn't terribly done: a terrible job is always noticeable.

Yup - that's true too.

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« Reply #16268 on: September 02, 2016, 04:48:21 PM »

Another couple of good books from the European side of things are the following:

"British Film Editors - The Heart of the Movie"

"Fine Cuts: The Art of European Film Editing"

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« Reply #16269 on: September 02, 2016, 07:59:28 PM »

Also "First Cut 1" and "First Cut 2" by gabrielle oldham are excellent. Nearly 50 Interviews with editors of every generation.

Who knew FoL board was such a strong avenue for editing book references?

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« Reply #16270 on: September 02, 2016, 08:26:05 PM »

From the Gaumont retro at MoMA:
Un témoin dans la ville (1959) 7/10. A man kills his mistress and gets away with it. Unhappily for him, the woman had a husband, and that husband is Lino Ventura. Lino decides to deliver the sentence that justice has failed to administer: he puts the guy's lights out, twice, then arranges things to look like a suicide. Lino plans for everything except that which could not be planned for--the chance appearance of a taxi driver at the most inauspicious time. Suddenly Lino realizes that he can be identified and tied to the killing, so the taxi driver is going to have to take a little ride . . . This has a nice jazz score, a lot of great noir photography, and cars at speed on the streets of Paris. It goes on a bit too long and gets kind of silly, but it's sure a lot more interesting than the imitation noir crap CJ's been watching lately. Sandra Milo is in the picture.

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« Reply #16271 on: September 03, 2016, 03:54:18 PM »

Down Terrace (2009) brutal story of a British crime family. 8/10

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« Reply #16272 on: September 03, 2016, 11:12:48 PM »

The Outfit (1973) 5/10

Movie assembles a classic cast of character from old crime movies. Nice to see their faces(even if for only a few moments), but this movie is a piece of crap. And very poorly written. Some of the most unimaginative dialogue ever. I spent 105 minutes rolling my eyes.

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« Reply #16273 on: September 04, 2016, 03:45:12 AM »

The Outfit (1973) 5/10

Movie assembles a classic cast of character from old crime movies. Nice to see their faces(even if for only a few moments), but this movie is a piece of crap. And very poorly written. Some of the most unimaginative dialogue ever. I spent 105 minites rolling my eyes.

I didn't like it either, the old faces were wasted.

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« Reply #16274 on: September 04, 2016, 08:11:19 AM »

Huh, I liked this more than you guys did. IMDb gives it a "7" and that's about where I'd place it. I really like Robert Ryan in this, the dynamic between him and Duval is good ("Can we deal?"). Sheree North is great. Joe Don Baker is always great. The cameos are nice but aren't really necessary. I've watched this a couple of times and probably will watch it a couple more.

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