Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 21, 2017, 08:52:10 PM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 Members and 5 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 1085 1086 [1087] 1088 1089 ... 1162 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1767024 times)
Novecento
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1517



View Profile
« Reply #16290 on: September 06, 2016, 07:43:11 PM »

Who knew FoL board was such a strong avenue for editing book references?

Specifically in terms of montage sequences, these two bilingual Serbian/English books essentially consisting of interviews with and articles by Slavko Vorkapich are also fascinating (albeit pretty hard to obtain):

"On True Cinema" (1994)
"9 Confessions of the Film Rebel" (2004)

Logged
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8314

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #16291 on: September 06, 2016, 08:34:04 PM »

Huh? Nights might be for the boys, but afternoons are definitely for the broads. Remember his American girlfriend, Betty? The film clearly presents them having a nooner--one that doesn't end until the sun goes down. And then the woman banging his uncle can't possibly get away during the night: if they're making it, as the film suggests they are, they have to be getting together in the day also. It's just that the gangster world is upside down in terms of everything including schedules--business is done at night, fucking takes place in the day.

He is definitely banging the babes, too; by "gay" I did not mean a complete queer. I just recall that there was a scene where his girl asked him to spend the night together, he declined, and then we have a scene of the men spending the evening in pajamas, with Gabin talking about how being with the girl is too much work. Sure, it could just be that he's an older guy who can't keep up with the younger babe, but I don't think it's out of the question that this may be one of your beloved gay subtexts.

Speaking of which, I am looking forward to spending tomorrow evening with you watching the French movie at MoMA. No chance we'll end the night together in pajamas, but when we get drinks afterward (on me - Happy Birthday!) I have this lovely Kenyan babe to tell you all about ...............

 I met her on East Side on the first Saturday night of the Olympics. Haven't watched many movies since then; I didn't even watch all the Olympic events. Basically, it came down to a choice of spending evenings in front of the TV watching Kenyan women run marathons, or having marathon sessions in bed with a Kenyan babe. I chose the latter. But I digress ...........

« Last Edit: September 06, 2016, 08:35:06 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13635

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #16292 on: September 07, 2016, 06:20:23 AM »

MoMA continues its outstanding tribute to Gaumont:

Le dos au mur / Back to the Wall
(1958). 9/10. DCP.  Directed by Édouard Molinaro. Jeanne Moreau is the cheating spouse, Gérard Oury the cuckold who contrives an elaborate and diabolical revenge. John Webster, phone your office. I first saw this in 1994 when Gaumont, celebrating 100 years of cinema, toured a retro of something like their greatest hits. I've been waiting to see it again and only got the chance last night. Almost as good as I remembered it.

One thing I've noticed in this tribute is how all the DCPs look the same. Regardless of year or director, every presentation is very dark, with inky blacks that sometimes result in obscuring details. The one 35mm print I've seen in this collection looks nothing like these DCPs; the blacks are much lighter. This really hits home the fact that, as good as these restorations are, they do not represent what was originally projected back in the 50s. We are in danger of having a very skewed understanding of our film heritage. Members of the Dipshit Generation are going to wind up even more clueless than they are now.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8314

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #16293 on: September 07, 2016, 11:45:15 AM »

Hell or High Water (2016) 6/10

A modern-day Western, kinda like NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN,  but not nearly as good.

AMC 42nd street, as well as some other AMC's, now have reserved seats. I like that new policy. On phone now, will expand a bit when I get to computer and have time to type.

So, as I mentioned above, AMC's Manhattan theaters now have reserved seats.

here is an article from last Friday's WSJ about it http://on.wsj.com/2cFb8Ck

Movie Theaters Switch to Reserved Seats
By Joseph De Avila
The Wall Street Journal
Sept. 3, 2016


Manhattan moviegoers gave mixed reviews Friday to AMC Entertainment Holdings Inc. AMC 0.95 % ’s decision to require patrons to reserve specific seats when purchasing movie tickets.

On Friday, six Manhattan AMC theaters switched from the traditional first-come-first-served model for movie seating to reserved seating, like concerts or Broadway shows. The locations join two other AMC theaters, the location on Broadway at West 84th Street and the theater in the East Village, that already require reservations. AMC’s Kips Bay theater, which is being renovated, will require reserved seats once its repairs are complete this fall.

Manhattan “seems like the perfect market to bring this to,” said AMC spokesman Ryan Noonan, since New Yorkers are frequently on the go or rely on the unpredictable nature of public transportation.

Although the new feature will give New Yorkers who buy online peace of mind that they will get a seat, there is also the potential it will slow down lines at the box office. Tickets purchased in-person now require the extra step of selecting a seat from the ticket seller’s screen.

“I can’t tell you for sure it will slow down or it won’t,” said Mr. Noonan. “I know we’ve gotten very good at making sure it’s a good experience,” for moviegoers.

New Jersey already has a few AMC theaters with reserved seating, and Connecticut has at least one, said Mr. Noonan. He said there are no immediate plans to expand reserved seating in those areas. Of the theater company’s 386 locations, he said, about a third allow moviegoers to book their seats early.

Some critics gave the change a thumbs-down.

“I just don’t like it because I feel like half the fun of going to the movies is going to the theater and assessing the situation and picking the best seats,” said Mia Katherine, 28 years old, a personal assistant from Brooklyn. “You can’t really tell on the screen how big the theater is and how close you are.”

Ms. Katherine said she is an avid moviegoer and goes to the theater every other week during Oscar season. She said the change might make it tougher for her to go to the movies on a whim.

“I feel like if I’m going to a movie at the last minute, and I see there is only certain seats left, I feel like that would discourage me from going if I know if I’m going to be at the top left or something,” Ms. Katherine said. “I like picking my own seat and not off of a computer screen.”

Other moviegoers said it was about time the movie industry caught up to other industries like airlines.

“So far the movie industry has been doing things ad hoc like a Southwest flight,” said Conway Ekpo, 39, an attorney from Manhattan. “And now it’s like assigned seats like every other airline. So there is no question, which helps makes things orderly.”

Misty Johnson, a Queens real-estate agent, gave a glowing review to reserved seating.

“At least when you come you know you got a good seat,” said Ms. Johnson, 38. “There’s been a lot of times when I wasn’t able to do that, and I get the seats and you are always in the front.”

Moviegoers will get used to it, she said. “Some people are afraid of change,” Ms. Johnson said. “It’s just what it is.”



----------------------------------


and here is an article from today's WSJ http://on.wsj.com/2cn94vk
Having Reservations About Reserved Movie Seats
By Ralph Gardner Jr.

The Wall Street Journal
Sept. 7, 2016



Of all the disturbing news lately, perhaps that which affects me most directly is last week’s move by AMC Entertainment Holdings AMC 0.95 % to offer reserved seating at its Manhattan movie theaters.

Under normal circumstances, I embrace predictability and certainty. My wife can blithely turn down an unmarked dirt road in a foreign country, confident that at the end of it sits the world’s most beautiful, undiscovered 15th-century castle, recently turned into a charming bed-and-breakfast.

I, on the other hand, break into a cold sweat.

But there’s something about entering a darkened theater—I consider it a point of pride to suffer through as few coming attractions as possible—that encourages the art of improvisation.

The mind never works as diligently as juggling the advanced geometry required to determine which of the remaining seats offers the best view of the screen.

And not just the best view, but also a seat that provides a buffer zone of one or more empty seats between you and the closest stranger.

Besides, nobody wants to sit directly behind a giant, especially if the film involves subtitles. I frequently contemplate the etiquette of asking the person whether, rather than sitting ramrod straight, he or she might be willing to slump.

Finally, and speaking of reservations, you want to reserve the right to move at the drop of a hat, often as the opening credits are rolling. While my view of human nature remains generally positive, it is remarkable how many maddening tics to which the species is prone, all of them accentuated by the captivity of a movie house.

These include, in no particular order:

People who view moviegoing as a culinary adventure and spend the first half-hour or so of the film, or until the on-screen explosions and body count grows sufficiently gruesome to distract them, dining on popcorn and rattling their Jujyfruits while draining their mastodon-sized soft drinks.

Talkers. A good 10% of the audience apparently believes that they haven’t left home. This gives them license to talk over the soundtrack, reprise or explain the dialogue to their friends, or express their disappointment if the film isn’t living up to expectations.

Twitchers. It is remarkable how many people can’t sit still.

Cellphone addicts. Despite the hectoring “no talking and no texting” trailers, there are individuals incapable of sitting through an entire movie without checking their friends’ updated Facebook FB 0.53 % statuses.

Unless you’re the president of the U.S., required to sign off on a drone strike, your email can probably wait.

For example, it occurred to me about three-quarters of the way through a 5 p.m. showing last year of “Mad Max: Fury Road” at the AMC Loews Lincoln Square 13 on the Upper West Side, that there was probably an email from my editor waiting for me, with questions on the column I filed that day. At risk to my career, I successfully resisted the temptation to check.

What’s supposed to happen under the new reserved-seating policy if you’re sitting next to one of the aforementioned miscreants and want to switch your location? Will it devolve into a standoff similar to the showdown at Yankee Stadium or the U.S. Open, where unforgiving ushers check your ticket, discover you’re an impostor, and banish you to the nosebleed section?

Finally, since ticket-purchasing lines already move at a glacial pace, what is going to happen now that patrons will be consulting with ticket sellers over the most advantageous available seats? If they’re anything like me, I’m more than willing to have a crowd form behind me while I weigh my options.

Besides, every movie theater is different. What constitutes a great seat at an art house will undoubtedly be different at an IMAX theater equipped with a screen several stories high.

While I’m scrupulous about not inconveniencing others, my favorite moviegoing conditions involve a half-empty house where I can sling my legs over the seat in front of me.

Will I be forced to buy two reserved seats for that small privilege?

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8314

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #16294 on: September 07, 2016, 11:57:21 AM »

I like the reserved seats.

There's no need for me to rush to get there early to try to get a good seat. I know where I am sitting and I can stroll in to the theater a minute before the movie starts and know that my good seat will be waiting for me. Or, if the theater is close to sold out and there are no good seats left, I'll know that beforehand and know not to go to that showing, rather than going into the theater and then finding out that i am stuck in a bad seat.

There are two drawbacks, IMO, which are mentioned in the above articles: the ticket-buying process will be longer; it'll take an extra minute when buying tickets to choose the seats. And if there are ten people on line in front of you, an extra minute per person will mean an extra ten minutes. Okay, not a terrible thing. But the more serious drawback for me is that if you are not familiar with the theater, you may not know yet which seat you want.

This just happened to me: I generally like to sit in one of the back rows, in middle of the theater. When I went to see Hell or High Water on Sunday night at the AMC 42nd street, I chose the back row middle (I usually prefer like second-to-back or third-to-back, but those were filled). But when I got to the screening room, I realized that this was a pretty small screen, and I preferred to sit a little closer. Luckily, the room was half-empty, and I was able to sit in the closer seats. But point is, if you don't know the theater, you don't know which seats are best.
But of course, if after you get to the theater you decide you want to switch seats, you can usually do so if a theater isn't too full (which is usually the case), and nobody else has tickets for that seat.

Still, overall, I am happy with this new policy. When I get the chance to go to a movie, it's often at an AMC theater - the one on 34th Street between 8th and 9th is my favorite; it has HUGE screens.
 When I buy the ticket, know where I am sitting, no need to walk around looking for a seat and get there early.  I am happy with that, and I hope that other theaters will soon adopt this policy as well.  Smiley


Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Novecento
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1517



View Profile
« Reply #16295 on: September 07, 2016, 12:03:52 PM »

One thing I've noticed in this tribute is how all the DCPs look the same. Regardless of year or director, every presentation is very dark, with inky blacks that sometimes result in obscuring details. The one 35mm print I've seen in this collection looks nothing like these DCPs; the blacks are much lighter. This really hits home the fact that, as good as these restorations are, they do not represent what was originally projected back in the 50s.

Interesting comment. I would note that restoring a "true black" which can then be used as reference point for other lighter shades is not necessarily the same as creating a "crushed black" where detail is obscured.

Logged
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13635

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #16296 on: September 08, 2016, 08:23:40 AM »

MoMA's Gaumont program ends with a turkey.

Un papillon sur l'épaule (1978) 0/10. Lino Ventura arrives in Barcelona, checks into his hotel. He goes to his room where he hears groans coming from the room next door. Going to investigate, he loses 2 days of his life and wakes up in a rest home where he's told he's recovering from a blow to the head. Cue the Gaslighting. Cue every cliché of suspense cinema (but without the suspense). This film is so predictable and plodding that Drink and I both walked out of it. The beer afterwards, though, was very good.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12609


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #16297 on: September 08, 2016, 07:28:55 PM »

Siesta (1987) A Lynchesque film soleil noir, with a beautiful Ellen Barkin providing substantial eye candy throughout. I'll do a full review soon 7-8/10

« Last Edit: September 08, 2016, 07:54:18 PM by cigar joe » Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13635

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #16298 on: September 09, 2016, 06:00:50 AM »

We Are Perfume World Tour 3rd Document (2015) 9/10. Not that this is a third document but rather a document of their third world tour. Not that they toured the third world, either. . . Impossible title. Anyway, their world tour encompassed a whopping 5 cities: Taipei, Singapore, LA, London, NYC. I don't think they'll be coming to, say, Rome anytime soon. I saw this on my last JAL flight back from Japan, and now I'm very happy to have the Blu-ray. Can you enjoy the documentary without enjoying the group? Doubtful. But who can't enjoy this group (besides titoli, of course)? Probably fans are supposed to pick one of the three performers as their "favorite" but I think that does violence to the whole project. Perfume is indivisible. Nakata-san, always in the background, writes some very catchy tunes. Their choreographer is no slouch either, and goes out on the road with the girls.  They have a huge staff that provides the visuals. The tour builds to a climactic performance at NYC's Hammerstein Ballroom, which was packed the night they filmed. At the after party the girls vowed to return in two years to a sold-out show at Madison Square Gardens. They might do it.

« Last Edit: September 09, 2016, 06:13:44 AM by dave jenkins » Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8314

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #16299 on: September 09, 2016, 08:25:34 AM »

MoMA's Gaumont program ends with a turkey.

Un papillon sur l'épaule (1978) 0/10. Lino Ventura arrives in Barcelona, checks into his hotel. He goes to his room where he hears groans coming from the room next door. Going to investigate, he loses 2 days of his life and wakes up in a rest home where he's told he's recovering from a blow to the head. Cue the Gaslighting. Cue every cliché of suspense cinema (but without the suspense). This film is so predictable and plodding that Drink and I both walked out of it. The beer afterwards, though, was very good.


DJ had a liter (in one glass!) of some Hausfressergardenvonbismarcklager and a couple of weiners and sauerkraut and potato salad.

I had Jack  Smiley

Happy Birthday!

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13635

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #16300 on: September 09, 2016, 11:10:06 AM »

Thanks, man. That was definitely some good beer. I wanna go back there . . . .

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12609


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #16301 on: September 09, 2016, 04:36:05 PM »

Thanks, man. That was definitely some good beer. I wanna go back there . . . .

where did you go?

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13635

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #16302 on: September 09, 2016, 05:23:10 PM »

I think it was this place: http://www.bierhausnyc.com/

I had a liter of the hefeweisen, which was very good. I'd like to try the Oktoberfest.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12609


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #16303 on: September 10, 2016, 08:48:09 AM »

I think it was this place: http://www.bierhausnyc.com/

I had a liter of the hefeweisen, which was very good. I'd like to try the Oktoberfest.

Thanks

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13635

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #16304 on: September 11, 2016, 10:01:53 AM »

92 in the Shade (1975) 5/10. This played at the recent Lincoln Center retro on Warren Oates but I was unable to make it. No worries, though, as it turns out there's a DVD, and anyway, the film's not all that great. What little plot there is consists of this: Peter Fonda is trying to get started as a fishing guide (CJ, call your office!) in Key West, and the old hands, instigated by Oates, play a trick on him. In retaliation Fonda burns Oates's boat up. The insurance will cover the loss, but during the lag Oates is worried Fonda will steal all his customers. So Oates issues Fonda an ultimatum: guide, and you die. Will Oates carry through on his threat? The film is filled with a host of A-listers: Harry Dean Stanton, Burgess Meredith, Margot Kidder, Elizabeth Ashley, William Hickey, Sylvia Miles. But they are used to little effect. Thomas McGuane, the novelist, wrote and directed the film, and there are many amateurish qualities to the production. Scenes, for example, end before they develop--haphazard editing it would seem. The lighting in most of the film doesn't work well. The soundtrack is a bit of a problem, too--there's a note at the end to say everything was re-dubbed in London (ITC bankrolled the film). Does that mean the direct sound had to be scrapped, or that that was the plan all along? This isn't so much a film as a demo of a film: too bad they never got around to making the real one.

« Last Edit: September 11, 2016, 10:02:56 AM by dave jenkins » Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
Pages: 1 ... 1085 1086 [1087] 1088 1089 ... 1162 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.057 seconds with 20 queries.