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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1767405 times)
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« Reply #16695 on: January 24, 2017, 03:48:38 AM »

Here are a few quotes about the ending of "The Getaway"

" but the ending was utterly bizarre and of a totally different character to the rest of the book. Even a surrealistic filmmaker like David Lynch would have struggled to do anything with it. A Peckinpah-like movie with a Lynch-like ending would have been a catastrophe"

" A lot of crime fiction aficionados donít like the surrealist ending of The Getaway.  I think that the ending is what makes this novel special.  After all thereís a reason that a book published as a throw away pulp fiction paperback in the late 1950s is still in print and we are still reading it and talking about it.

Doc and Carol are headed for sanctuary in the Kingdom of El Rey which is described as a hideaway for fugitives in Mexico.  El Rey, which means ďThe KingĒ in Spanish, has lavish first class accommodations.  In fact, residents are required to pay for first class accommodations, because they wanted everything first class in their previous lives.  However, when your money runs out, you are banished to an outlying village.  There is no food from the outside allowed in the village.  The residents exiled from El Rey survive by cannibalizing each other.  Therefore, couples who seek refuge in El Rey usually wind up murdering the other partner to conserve cash.  That is, the ones who donít commit suicide out of despair.  So, in the midst of first class villas by the sea and unlimited gourmet food and drink, everyone in El Rey is miserably awaiting their ultimate demise.

Obviously, all of this is not to be taken literally.  Because it is a radical departure from the realism of the rest of the book, a lot of readers over years have despised the ending.  I think that the allegory really begins before the fleeing couple get to El Rey.  After killing Rudy and his girlfriend, Doc and Carol flee in a stolen taxi.  Facing certain capture, they are rescued by crime family matriarch Ma Santis.  Ma Santis hides the couple out first in underwater caves where the space is no bigger than a coffin and then in a lean-to hidden in a manure pile.

This entire episode is heavy with symbolism.  Doc and Carol have to strip naked and dive into a water filled pit to get to the cave hideaway.  The rooms in the caves are just big enough to lie down in and Doc and Carol are separated by a wall of rock.  Obviously, this represents death and the grave.

Then after coming up from the pit, Doc and Carol hide out in a lean two hidden inside a pile of cow manure. During the day, they are faced with swarms of flies and worms.  Itís not difficult to figure out that this represents that, although still technically alive, Doc and Carol are decaying corpses.

Then Ma Santis arranges for Carol and Doc to be taken to Mexico by a Portuguese fishing boat Captain. The body count again mounts up when they have to kill the crew of a Coast Guard Patrol Boat.  I think that the boat ride represents the ferrying of the dead across the River Stix to the underworld in Greek mythology.

El Rey is the Devil and his Kingdom is Hell.  For a novel that is a fast paced conventional crime novel until 2/3 of the way through, all of this symbolism and allegory has been tough for a lot of readers to take. "

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« Reply #16696 on: January 24, 2017, 04:06:52 AM »

Thanks!

I guess it could have worked if the film had been shot ŗ la Apocalypse Now all the way to the explicitly symbolic ending. But I really like the film the way it is. Also, it was fun to see them going to places I went to:



I also just realised Al Lettieri/Rudy was The Godfather's Sollozzo.

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« Reply #16697 on: January 24, 2017, 04:57:48 AM »

Here are a few quotes about the ending of "The Getaway"

" but the ending was utterly bizarre and of a totally different character to the rest of the book. Even a surrealistic filmmaker like David Lynch would have struggled to do anything with it. A Peckinpah-like movie with a Lynch-like ending would have been a catastrophe"

" A lot of crime fiction aficionados donít like the surrealist ending of The Getaway.  I think that the ending is what makes this novel special.  After all thereís a reason that a book published as a throw away pulp fiction paperback in the late 1950s is still in print and we are still reading it and talking about it.

Doc and Carol are headed for sanctuary in the Kingdom of El Rey which is described as a hideaway for fugitives in Mexico.  El Rey, which means ďThe KingĒ in Spanish, has lavish first class accommodations.  In fact, residents are required to pay for first class accommodations, because they wanted everything first class in their previous lives.  However, when your money runs out, you are banished to an outlying village.  There is no food from the outside allowed in the village.  The residents exiled from El Rey survive by cannibalizing each other.  Therefore, couples who seek refuge in El Rey usually wind up murdering the other partner to conserve cash.  That is, the ones who donít commit suicide out of despair.  So, in the midst of first class villas by the sea and unlimited gourmet food and drink, everyone in El Rey is miserably awaiting their ultimate demise.

Obviously, all of this is not to be taken literally.  Because it is a radical departure from the realism of the rest of the book, a lot of readers over years have despised the ending.  I think that the allegory really begins before the fleeing couple get to El Rey.  After killing Rudy and his girlfriend, Doc and Carol flee in a stolen taxi.  Facing certain capture, they are rescued by crime family matriarch Ma Santis.  Ma Santis hides the couple out first in underwater caves where the space is no bigger than a coffin and then in a lean-to hidden in a manure pile.

This entire episode is heavy with symbolism.  Doc and Carol have to strip naked and dive into a water filled pit to get to the cave hideaway.  The rooms in the caves are just big enough to lie down in and Doc and Carol are separated by a wall of rock.  Obviously, this represents death and the grave.

Then after coming up from the pit, Doc and Carol hide out in a lean two hidden inside a pile of cow manure. During the day, they are faced with swarms of flies and worms.  Itís not difficult to figure out that this represents that, although still technically alive, Doc and Carol are decaying corpses.

Then Ma Santis arranges for Carol and Doc to be taken to Mexico by a Portuguese fishing boat Captain. The body count again mounts up when they have to kill the crew of a Coast Guard Patrol Boat.  I think that the boat ride represents the ferrying of the dead across the River Stix to the underworld in Greek mythology.

El Rey is the Devil and his Kingdom is Hell.  For a novel that is a fast paced conventional crime novel until 2/3 of the way through, all of this symbolism and allegory has been tough for a lot of readers to take. "

Ooops, I did not remember that it was so weird.

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« Reply #16698 on: January 24, 2017, 07:31:53 AM »

I'm thinking now that The Getaway is due for one more remake . . .  Anyone have Megan Ellison's contact info?

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« Reply #16699 on: January 24, 2017, 03:25:38 PM »

The Founder (2017) - 8/10. Ray Kroc (Michael Keaton) launches a fast-food empire and screws the McDonald brothers out of their trademark-able name. Fascinating to watch, and some great performances, but afterwards I was left with a rather empty feeling. This is really a film about nothing.

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« Reply #16700 on: January 24, 2017, 05:49:01 PM »

Ooops, I did not remember that it was so weird.

That last chapter is crazy but just that final image of Doc and Carol sitting next to each other, laughing away as they were plotting to kill one another is a great ending. I doubt a true adaptation can happen but it would be interesting to see how someone can possibly think they can make the last chapter work. I never knew fans didn't care for the ending though. I read Thompson's Savage Night before I read The Getaway and the last chapter in that book is in the same vein as The Getaway. Even his novel Hell of a Women has the sharp right turn ending that those other books have. But now back to movie opinions...

American Splendor 4/5

Top runner for best comic to live action adaptation.

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« Reply #16701 on: January 24, 2017, 07:19:08 PM »

Here are a few quotes about the ending of "The Getaway"

" but the ending was utterly bizarre and of a totally different character to the rest of the book. Even a surrealistic filmmaker like David Lynch would have struggled to do anything with it. A Peckinpah-like movie with a Lynch-like ending would have been a catastrophe"

" A lot of crime fiction aficionados donít like the surrealist ending of The Getaway.  I think that the ending is what makes this novel special.  After all thereís a reason that a book published as a throw away pulp fiction paperback in the late 1950s is still in print and we are still reading it and talking about it.

Doc and Carol are headed for sanctuary in the Kingdom of El Rey which is described as a hideaway for fugitives in Mexico.  El Rey, which means ďThe KingĒ in Spanish, has lavish first class accommodations.  In fact, residents are required to pay for first class accommodations, because they wanted everything first class in their previous lives.  However, when your money runs out, you are banished to an outlying village.  There is no food from the outside allowed in the village.  The residents exiled from El Rey survive by cannibalizing each other.  Therefore, couples who seek refuge in El Rey usually wind up murdering the other partner to conserve cash.  That is, the ones who donít commit suicide out of despair.  So, in the midst of first class villas by the sea and unlimited gourmet food and drink, everyone in El Rey is miserably awaiting their ultimate demise.

Obviously, all of this is not to be taken literally.  Because it is a radical departure from the realism of the rest of the book, a lot of readers over years have despised the ending.  I think that the allegory really begins before the fleeing couple get to El Rey.  After killing Rudy and his girlfriend, Doc and Carol flee in a stolen taxi.  Facing certain capture, they are rescued by crime family matriarch Ma Santis.  Ma Santis hides the couple out first in underwater caves where the space is no bigger than a coffin and then in a lean-to hidden in a manure pile.

This entire episode is heavy with symbolism.  Doc and Carol have to strip naked and dive into a water filled pit to get to the cave hideaway.  The rooms in the caves are just big enough to lie down in and Doc and Carol are separated by a wall of rock.  Obviously, this represents death and the grave.

Then after coming up from the pit, Doc and Carol hide out in a lean two hidden inside a pile of cow manure. During the day, they are faced with swarms of flies and worms.  Itís not difficult to figure out that this represents that, although still technically alive, Doc and Carol are decaying corpses.

Then Ma Santis arranges for Carol and Doc to be taken to Mexico by a Portuguese fishing boat Captain. The body count again mounts up when they have to kill the crew of a Coast Guard Patrol Boat.  I think that the boat ride represents the ferrying of the dead across the River Stix to the underworld in Greek mythology.

El Rey is the Devil and his Kingdom is Hell.  For a novel that is a fast paced conventional crime novel until 2/3 of the way through, all of this symbolism and allegory has been tough for a lot of readers to take. "

This is so interesting! I had no idea about any of this - thanks for sharing.

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« Reply #16702 on: January 24, 2017, 08:51:08 PM »

PATRIOTS DAY (2017) 7.5/10

Further discussion in reply #11 of this thread http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=11661.msg186402#msg186402

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« Reply #16703 on: January 25, 2017, 06:38:12 AM »

Wait Until Dark (1967) - 6/10. Audrey Hepburn plays a blind woman alone in her apartment being in turn conned and then menaced by Jack Weston, Richard Crenna, and a very maniacal Alan Arkin. And that's all there is to this, there are no subplots. From a stage play, and the staginess is evident throughout (the screen goes completely dark at times, theatrically effective, but the very anathema of cinema). Features an early example of the Just-When-You-Think-He's-Dead-He's-Back convention. Warners new blu looks quite good.

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« Reply #16704 on: January 25, 2017, 07:43:15 AM »

The Crown (2016), season 1
It looked boring, so I didn't want to watch but was convinced by the overwhelming praise it gets. Also, everybody was getting overexcited about episode 4, including two producers of mine.
So, it's very well shot, features great acting, interesting dialogue and is really boring. It crushes Downtown Abbey and all the Gosford Park ripoffs we've seen over the years and shows us a particulat time and place cinema and TV have avoided for decades. But it's boring. I've seen episode 4, which is really good, but since it seems to be the absolute best the series has to offer, I'm stopping right now.

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« Reply #16705 on: January 25, 2017, 05:26:35 PM »

Split (2016) 7/10. As in "Personality," geddit? James McAvoy plays a nutter with 23 different ones (you don't have to believe such things happen in real life--this is a film that allows for supernatural explanations of things). He abducts 3 women (they're supposed to be girls, but the actresses are much too old) and imprisons them for a purpose so much worse than what you might imagine. His shrink begins to suspect something is up, but she takes too long to discover what and do anything about it. Good thing one of the girls has plenty of gumption and the advantages (I kid you not) that an abusive home life provides. I don't usually like D. Knight Sham-eleon's films, but thought I'd take a chance on this after a friend came back from a showing telling me there was no twist in it. What? I had to see for myself. My friend was mistaken, but the twist when it came (in the very last frames of the film) didn't ruin the whole thing for me. An entertaining film, even though the climax is a girl in a underground labyrinth running away from a maniac (especially when the girl has a shotgun, rounds, and flashback scenes showing she knows how to use the weapon). McAvoy of course impresses with his multiple "roles."

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« Reply #16706 on: January 25, 2017, 09:44:29 PM »

Boomerang! (1947) 7/10. After a popular Episcopal priest is murdered, Lee J. Cobb and Karl Malden--under community pressure--attempt to railroad witless Arthur Kennedy into the gas chamber. State's Attorney Dana Andrews is all set to prosecute, but something doesn't quite sit right. His dilemna then: go along with what's been set in motion (and please his Party masters), or hold out for justice? This being a film from '47 (and an Elia Kazan at that), there is, of course, no dilemna at all. This film is one of the few to expose the unreliability of eye witnesses (7 erroneously finger Kennedy). Set in a nameless Connecticut town, and based on a true event, the street scenes (according to IMDb) were shot in Stamford; interestingly, the interior courtroom scenes were filmed right here in White Plains. (This was a Louis de Rochemont "sets?-we-don't-need-no-stinking-sets!" production).

Just saw this movie on TCM. First viewing.

It's not great; I would give it a 6.5/10, but if you are not using half-points, I guess I can't argue with 7/10.

The worst thing about this movie (and a hundred others) is the silly narration. The best thing: splid acting all around, and also nice location work. I guess that this time period, the late 1940's, is when location filming was starting to be used, and the narrated police procedural. Note that the most famous narrated procedural noir with location shooting - THE NAKED CITY - didn't come out until a year later. Anyway, BOOMERANG may be a crime drama, a narrated police and legal procedural, but it does not have the noir cinematography we are used to, especially in the 40's. In the 50's, many of the films we now call noirs didn't use the same noir cinematography anymore. (I recall Eddie Muller once saying something like: In the 40's, noir was about the cinematography; in the 50's, it was more about the locations.)

To me this seems just like a crime drama, a narrated police/legal produral crime drama. But call it noir if you wish.

Anyway, the real-life character that Dana Andrews's character is based on is Homer Cummings.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homer_Stille_Cummings
It is wonderful that as a local prosecutor Cummings was interested in justice and not in scoring political points, but in his more famous later life he was FDR's first Attorney General, a bastard who supported the New Deal, was one of the legal fighters for the New Deal; and when, during the early years of the New Deal, the Supreme Court declared one New Deal program after another unconstitutional, Cummings was one of the bastards behind Roosevelt's infamous "court-packing scheme," an (attempted) act which will live in infamy, as the United States' system of democracy and separation of powers was deliberately attacked by a power-hungry Roosevelt Administration. Though the court-packing scheme itself failed, the Supreme Court suddenly began ruling that Roosevelt's New Deal programs were constitutional - the court-packing scheme scared the Court into going along with the New Deal, and eventually, as the old justices began dying out and FDR unfortunately lived way too long, he got to appoint more and more justices, and the New Deal was safe from constitutional challenge.

Whether you are a conservative who hates the New Deal or a leftist who loves it,  it is no exaggeration at all to say that the New Deal - which became insulated from constitutional challenge due in large measure to FDR's court-packing scheme - is still affecting us significantly to this day. It allowed an IMO unconstitutional, and inarguably unprecedented, expansion of the federal government that continues to this day. Some of the same Supreme Court rulings upholding parts of the New Deal are still used today to legalize all sorts of federal overreach. Just one example: the infamous 1942 case Wickard vs. Filburn https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wickard_v._Filburn


So ......... yeah, Homer Cummings may have been a decent and honest prosecutor, but he was a bastard nonetheless  Evil

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« Reply #16707 on: January 26, 2017, 11:40:40 AM »


Anyway, the real-life character that Dana Andrews's character is based on is Homer Cummings.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homer_Stille_Cummings
It is wonderful that as a local prosecutor Cummings was interested in justice and not in scoring political points, but in his more famous later life he was FDR's first Attorney General, a bastard who supported the New Deal, was one of the legal fighters for the New Deal; and when, during the early years of the New Deal, the Supreme Court declared one New Deal program after another unconstitutional, Cummings was one of the bastards behind Roosevelt's infamous "court-packing scheme," an (attempted) act which will live in infamy, as the United States' system of democracy and separation of powers was deliberately attacked by a power-hungry Roosevelt Administration. Though the court-packing scheme itself failed, the Supreme Court suddenly began ruling that Roosevelt's New Deal programs were constitutional - the court-packing scheme scared the Court into going along with the New Deal, and eventually, as the old justices began dying out and FDR unfortunately lived way too long, he got to appoint more and more justices, and the New Deal was safe from constitutional challenge.

Whether you are a conservative who hates the New Deal or a leftist who loves it,  it is no exaggeration at all to say that the New Deal - which became insulated from constitutional challenge due in large measure to FDR's court-packing scheme - is still affecting us significantly to this day. It allowed an IMO unconstitutional, and inarguably unprecedented, expansion of the federal government that continues to this day. Some of the same Supreme Court rulings upholding parts of the New Deal are still used today to legalize all sorts of federal overreach. Just one example: the infamous 1942 case Wickard vs. Filburn https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wickard_v._Filburn


So ......... yeah, Homer Cummings may have been a decent and honest prosecutor, but he was a bastard nonetheless  Evil
What the HELL does this have to do with Boomerang!Huh

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« Reply #16708 on: January 26, 2017, 05:03:41 PM »

Hellraiser - 4/5

Solid stuff except for the part near the end when the female protagonist Kirsty (what a weird name to say) starts using the Puzzle Box as a gun and starts vaporizing the Cenobits. Except for the large one who gets done in with the ceiling collapsing on him.

Hellraiser 2 - 3/5

If you enjoyed the first one, you'll probably enjoy this one.

Hellraiser 3 - 3/5

If you enjoyed the first two, you might not enjoy this one. 

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« Reply #16709 on: January 26, 2017, 05:18:02 PM »

White Sands (1992) Andy of Mayberry meets Marv and Jules, Willem Dafoe, Mickey Rourke, and Samuel L. Jackson, with Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, and M. Emmet Walsh, the sum is not as good as its parts though, starts off great then gets unnecessarily complicated. 6.5/10

Palmetto (1998) Director: Volker SchlŲndorff a good Neo Noir that gets everything right, starring Woody Harrelson, Elisabeth Shue, Gina Gershon, Michael Rapaport, ChloŽ Sevigny, and Tom Wright 8/10

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