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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1832146 times)
XhcnoirX
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« Reply #16950 on: April 02, 2017, 03:26:58 PM »

The Big Operator (1959): Mickey Rooney plays a ruthless union boss who goes after laborers Steve Cochran and Mel Tormé after he finds out they saw him with criminal Ray Danton, something he denied in a high publicity court case. Tough and gritty crime drama with good performances (and Tormé as a human torch), but the story's not very surprising and Cochran is way too straight & nice. 7/10

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« Reply #16951 on: April 02, 2017, 03:37:53 PM »

The Big Operator (1959): Mickey Rooney plays a ruthless union boss who goes after laborers Steve Cochran and Mel Tormé after he finds out they saw him with criminal Ray Danton, something he denied in a high publicity court case. Tough and gritty crime drama with good performances (and Tormé as a human torch), but the story's not very surprising and Cochran is way too straight & nice. 7/10

This one is one my list to check, is it Noir-ish at all cinematographically wise?

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« Reply #16952 on: April 02, 2017, 03:51:06 PM »

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Cochran is way too straight & nice.

Then I don't want to see it. I like my Cochran mean.  Wink

I didn't know Mel Torme did any acting.

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« Reply #16953 on: April 02, 2017, 04:20:38 PM »

Season 1 and 2 are on Netflix
not in murica!

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« Reply #16954 on: April 02, 2017, 06:36:43 PM »

The Passion of Martin (1991) - 8/10
Very funny dark comedy, the first film from Alexander Payne. Winds up very disturbing, it's like a tea twisted version of Scorseses segment in New York Stories. I can assume this is one of he best student films ever made.

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« Reply #16955 on: April 03, 2017, 02:10:33 AM »

This one is one my list to check, is it Noir-ish at all cinematographically wise?

Not really, it is shot very straight-forward (closer to the 50s documentary style). Story-wise it is also far too black & white and non-ambiguous to be called noir-ish.

Then I don't want to see it. I like my Cochran mean.  Wink

I didn't know Mel Torme did any acting.

Yeah, it was weird seeing Cochran being part of one of those 1950s perfect households... But if you don't wanna watch it for nice guy Cochran, I wasn't kidding when I said Torme is a human torch. He gets set on fire onscreen, a real WOW moment.

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« Reply #16956 on: April 03, 2017, 02:40:28 AM »

Humoresque (1946) - 9/10. That gag with Isaac Stern's hands and John Garfield's torso really works. Man! But thank goodness for the academy ratio; I'm not sure the illusion would go over as well in widescreen. The cast in this are so good--I think this was probably Garfield's best performance: half boxer, half aesthete. Crawford is suitably bitchy, but also has that whole MILF thing going for her. Everybody in support is great, too, especially the woman playing Garfield's mother, but also the guy playing Crawford's hubby. Of course, huge kudos to Oscar Levant, who is very funny. Strange thing about Levant, he's in a bunch of pictures written by different people (Rhapsody in Blue, The Bandwagon, this) but he's always the same character delivering the same shtick. He's got more zingers in this than in any other picture of his I know. Then there's all the great music: Dvorak, Chopin, Gershwin, Wagner's Liebestod from Tristan. I would have missed the cool Carmen Fantasie that Waxman scored, and its significance, if not for a helpful supplement on the Warner's DVD. Even so, the documentary doesn't talk about any of the low-brow music in the flick. I've seen the film before, but this time through I noticed how often the principals make their way back to a certain piano bar. The locale has its purpose for the narrative--there are several scenes where the characters have to talk together and they need some place to do it--but more than that, the bar provides music for audience members not so keen on the classical repertoire. This film has something for everybody: melodrama and music, clothes and martinis, a mom and pop store and room with a view. Lots of fancy music, but if you wait you can go back to the piano bar and hear show tunes. And who's performing the tunes? I had to go to IMDb for this, but it turns out to be a woman named Peg La Centra, a singer with Artie Shaw who also became Paul Stewart's wife. I have to dock the film a point for its risible ending (just WHY does Crawford kill herself? Wouldn't it have made more sense for her to have made a mistake with some sleeping pills? Granted, the walk into the surf is more dramatic, but still.) Nonetheless, this film has more entertainment per square inch than any of the crap they're making today. Where's the Blu-ray?

Here is a hilarious review on HUMORESQUE http://www.slantmagazine.com/film/review/humoresque

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« Reply #16957 on: April 03, 2017, 07:56:42 AM »

Thanks, d & d for the link to Slant Magazine. For the most part, I couldn't agree more though it's quite a while since I've seen Humoresque. As I said in my own reviews, I always like to watch Crawford movies even if most of them are silly, but so enjoyable.

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Basically, Humoresque is a film about Joan Crawford's face, that marvel of early make-up call architecture and brutal star self-will.

That certainly holds true for most of her later pictures.

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« Reply #16958 on: April 03, 2017, 12:02:26 PM »

That's not a bad review; valid points are made entertainingly. But that's not the whole of the movie. As I mentioned in my comments above, the Oscar Levant stuff is worth visiting for, as are the Peg La Centra performances. There's a lot going on in the picture.

UPDATE: The old SCTV parody can still generate a few chuckles: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqW9XdgPKko

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« Reply #16959 on: April 03, 2017, 01:01:04 PM »

Patriots Day (2016) - 6/10
Eh, a bit dramatized and corny and way too 'Boston'. It's the obligatory post-Departed Boston movie of the year. It has its moments. It'd be a much better film had it stuck to its docu-style and taken more of a 'matter of fact' approach, but it tries a bit too hard to tug on the heartstrings - lots of useless scenes pull from the focus, and he shaky cam a bit too intense

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« Reply #16960 on: April 03, 2017, 07:07:33 PM »

Song of the Horse (1970) - 4/10
Kurosawa's until-recently lost TV documentary about horses. Only worth viewing for completionist reasons, forgettable work. A fictional father-son narrative as tacked onto an otherwise bland documentary, despite a few interesting Kurosawa-isms here and there.

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« Reply #16961 on: April 03, 2017, 08:46:34 PM »

Song of the Horse (1970) - 4/10
Kurosawa's until-recently lost TV documentary about horses. Only worth viewing for completionist reasons, forgettable work. A fictional father-son narrative as tacked onto an otherwise bland documentary, despite a few interesting Kurosawa-isms here and there.

Interesting. Did you watch it via the newly released DVD? I'm definitely curious.

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« Reply #16962 on: April 04, 2017, 08:56:45 AM »

Interesting. Did you watch it via the newly released DVD? I'm definitely curious.
yeah I got it off of Samurai DVD. The colors look very washed out, I'm not sure if this is due to the transfer or if it has justaeays been like this due to it being 1970 Japanese TV. Otherwise it looks fine - no menus or anything, pop in the DVD and it starts running. 73 minutes.

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« Reply #16963 on: April 04, 2017, 08:59:57 AM »

Thanks - might check it out.

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« Reply #16964 on: April 04, 2017, 10:06:28 AM »

Rear Window (1954) - 10/10. Thirty-fifth viewing. I get something new out of this amazing film every time. This time I noticed yet another bit of virtuoso filmmaking during the Lisa-in-Thorwald's-apartment scene. The composer is doing an instrumental run-through of his new song with all the musicians in his apartment. We later learn that the name of the song is "Lisa" when the completed work is played on phonograph for Miss Lonelyhearts at the end of the picture. The run-through commences right at the beginning of Lisa's charge up the fire escape and ends exactly when the scene does with the police rescue. And of course, the music is supposedly diegetic. Brilliant.

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