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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1764476 times)
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« Reply #16980 on: April 07, 2017, 06:35:24 AM »

Then why did you watch it?
it was only 50 minutes long, halfway through the cell phone came out for some browsing. It gets a 2 for giving me one all right laugh at the beginning.

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« Reply #16981 on: April 07, 2017, 08:17:43 PM »

Il Grido (1957) Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, starring Steve Cochran, Alida Valli, Dorian Gray, and Lynn Shaw. Depressing film about a man losing his bearings in life and doomed to wander the countryside alienated and depressed. Nice cinematography. 7/10

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« Reply #16982 on: April 08, 2017, 07:56:00 PM »

Guns, Girls, And Gangsters (1959) Mamie Van Doren, Gerald Mohr, Lee Van Cleef.  Ex con Chuck Wheeler gets out of the Pen and sets up a armred car robbery of a Las Vegas casino. Van Cleef is his hot headed nut job best, Van Doren is the eye candy. 7/10

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« Reply #16983 on: April 09, 2017, 09:41:35 AM »

I Want to Live (1958) - 10/10. I put off watching this film for years because I heard it was a message picture. Not only a message picture, but a Robert Wise message picture. Wise is not much of an auteur (though a great craftsman); his messages tend to run to the pedestrian (The Sand Pebbles: "War kills people") or the inane (Odds Against Tomorrow: "Without racial tolerance criminals will never be successful") and sure enough, the theme of IWTL seems to be "It is wrong to railroad an innocent person into the gas chamber." But the film is so well made that the message is almost beside the point. Wise intros with a jazz score, then in rapid succession, gives us 15 separate shots--all Dutch angles!--showing, among other things, the band members playing that very score in the club where the first scene is shot. That's just for starters: the bravura filmmaking goes on to set things up at a tremendous pace, then hurtles events along through incarceration, trial, and finally the inevitable endgame at San Quentin. There is a documentary quality to much of the beautiful black-and-white photography. Time is dilated in the final sequence to make the wait for the execution excruciating--temporary stays add to the suspense. The attention to detail is terrific. If you ever wanted to know the procedure for running a gas chamber you'll be satisfied after seeing this. And then there's the central performance by Susan Hayward. The character she plays is based on an actual woman named Barbara Graham, and Hayward makes her very, very real (Ms. Hayward won an Oscar for the portrayal).  In any other film that one performance would have been sufficient to carry the film, but Wise places it among a host of fantastic supporting and bit roles. IMDb lists a cast of 85 (only 27 credited). Great character actors like Simon Oakland and Theodore Bikel and John Marley (as Father Devers!) contribute, but also TV regulars like Stafford Repp (Batman's Chief O'Hara), Wesley Lau (Perry Mason's Sgt. Anderson), Raymond Bailey (The Beverly Hillbillies' Mr. Drysdale) and a very thin Gavin MacLeod. Then there are cameos by Dabbs Greer, Jack Weston, Peter Breck, even S. John Launer (the guy who can never remember the combination to the safe in Marnie; also, many judges on Perry Mason). And many more--so many that I cannot account for them all. The effect is to create a world like our own, populated as ours is (which almost never happens in a picture). The new Blu-ray from Twilight Time is gorgeous.

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« Reply #16984 on: April 09, 2017, 09:58:25 AM »

Zookeeper's Wife - I enjoyed it.

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« Reply #16985 on: April 09, 2017, 04:24:37 PM »

Your Name (2016) - 7/10. Aside from Girls Und Panzer I have no interest in Japanese anime, and I was going to pass on this, but I read a review that suggested it might be a bit better than the usual thing. And it is. It starts out as a body-switch story, then after an interesting mid-plot twist develops into something else. It's kinda Freaky Friday meets Somewhere in Time meets Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. But animated. And with a comet. You could do worse.

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« Reply #16986 on: April 09, 2017, 04:26:04 PM »

I Want to Live (1958) - 10/10. I put off watching this film for years because I heard it was a message picture. Not only a message picture, but a Robert Wise message picture. Wise is not much of an auteur (though a great craftsman); his messages tend to run to the pedestrian (The Sand Pebbles: "War kills people") or the inane (Odds Against Tomorrow: "Without racial tolerance criminals will never be successful") and sure enough, the theme of IWTL seems to be "It is wrong to railroad an innocent person into the gas chamber." But the film is so well made that the message is almost beside the point. Wise intros with a jazz score, then in rapid succession, gives us 15 separate shots--all Dutch angles!--showing, among other things, the band members playing that very score in the club where the first scene is shot. That's just for starters: the bravura filmmaking goes on to set things up at a tremendous pace, then hurtles events along through incarceration, trial, and finally the inevitable endgame at San Quentin. There is a documentary quality to much of the beautiful black-and-white photography. Time is dilated in the final sequence to make the wait for the execution excruciating--temporary stays add to the suspense. The attention to detail is terrific. If you ever wanted to know the procedure for running a gas chamber you'll be satisfied after seeing this. And then there's the central performance by Susan Hayward. The character she plays is based on an actual woman named Barbara Graham, and Hayward makes her very, very real (Ms. Hayward won an Oscar for the portrayal).  In any other film that one performance would have been sufficient to carry the film, but Wise places it among a host of fantastic supporting and bit roles. IMDb lists a cast of 85 (only 27 credited). Great character actors like Simon Oakland and Theodore Bikel and John Marley (as Father Devers!) contribute, but also TV regulars like Stafford Repp (Batman's Chief O'Hara), Wesley Lau (Perry Mason's Sgt. Anderson), Raymond Bailey (The Beverly Hillbillies' Mr. Drysdale) and a very thin Gavin MacLeod. Then there are cameos by Dabbs Greer, Jack Weston, Peter Breck, even S. John Launer (the guy who can never remember the combination to the safe in Marnie; also, many judges on Perry Mason). And many more--so many that I cannot account for them all. The effect is to create a world like our own, populated as ours is (which almost never happens in a picture). The new Blu-ray from Twilight Time is gorgeous.

I like it also, but not quite as much as you. Check out it's poor relation Why Must I Die? (1960) here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Etbl8wkS9bc&t=1s

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« Reply #16987 on: April 09, 2017, 05:45:00 PM »

Guns, Girls, And Gangsters (1959) Mamie Van Doren, Gerald Mohr, Lee Van Cleef.  Ex con Chuck Wheeler gets out of the Pen and sets up a armred car robbery of a Las Vegas casino. Van Cleef is his hot headed nut job best, Van Doren is the eye candy. 7/10

I remember seeing this a while ago. It actually was better than the ridiculous title would indicate.

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« Reply #16988 on: April 09, 2017, 07:31:39 PM »

Poodle Springs (1998) - 6/10. James Caan as Marlowe. Lame TV-like production, but with some features of interest. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bHuS2v4LA8

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« Reply #16989 on: April 09, 2017, 09:56:55 PM »

Poodle Springs (1998) - 6/10. James Caan as Marlowe. Lame TV-like production, but with some features of interest. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bHuS2v4LA8

My review:

Reply #719 on: March 23, 2011, 12:30:26 AM    
Poodle Springs (1998) There is the famous anecdote about the people filming The Big Sleep about not knowing who had killed a secondary character of the story and Chandler, asked by them about it, didn't remember either. Well, I don't know what poor Leigh Brackett and Howard Hawks could have made if they had to transpose this for the screen. I mean, I haven't read the novel (and I never intended to, out of respect for Chandler) but if I assume (as jenkins is wont to) that Rafelson simplified the story once he brought it on the screen I can't imagine what the original novel (a development on the first 6 chapters left by Chandler) by Robert B. Parker was like.  But that is not the question because that is not why people, I think, read P.I. novels. You read Agatha Christie for the plot, you read Chandler or Spillane or even Stout for the characters, the dialogues, the city descriptions. Here the dialogues are standard, nothing memorable. Characters are standard and forgettable as well. The final explication and shooting are embarrassing. And, most of all, James Caan does nothing to sympathize with his character: and he looks old, older than Mitchum in his own Marlowe movies. I think Caan could have made a good (don't know how good) Mike Hammer in the '70's or even the '80's. But his Marlowe at 58 sucks. I think the best Marlowe, or at least the one that suits better my idea of him, is James Garner's, even though The Little Sister is not the best movie of the series. 6\10

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« Reply #16990 on: April 10, 2017, 01:20:54 AM »

Fences (2016) 7.5/10

Very well acted.

One thing: Denzel is trying to speak like a black Southerner raised in the 1910's, but he speaks way too well for that. He basically speaks with the regular Denzel accent, but talking slang. So his accent is not too convincing; maybe it's just cuz I know Denzel too well. But his performance was, as always, stellar. Everyone was great. Viola Davis won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress.

My rating is not very high, because - as you might expect from a movie based on a play - there are a bunch of monologues that occasionally get tiresome; they could have done a little better job making it more cinematic and less play-like. I didn't even know it was a play before I started watching the movie, but immediately figured out that it must have been a play.

I won't spoil anything, I'll just say that I did not like how the movie ended - the very end, the last few shots, were a bit corny.

Overall this was pretty good.

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« Reply #16991 on: April 10, 2017, 07:00:00 PM »

The Savage Eye (1960) Experimental "Dramatised Documentary" Noir
 

 
A passion project, directed and produced by a triumvirate of Ben Maddow who was also a prolific screenwriter and documentarian noted for (Framed (1947), Kiss the Blood Off My Hands (1948) (adaptation), The Asphalt Jungle (1950)), film director and editor Sidney Meyers (The Quiet One (1948)), and director, producer and screenwriter Joseph Strick (The Big Break (1953), Tropic of Cancer (1970), Road Movie (1974)).
 
They worked on this project, both writing and editing it in the city of Los Angeles, California, over a number of years in the late 50's strictly on their weekends for roughly $65,000. The music was by Leonard Rosenman. The outstanding cinematography was by Jack Couffer, Helen Levitt and Haskell Wexler.
 
The Savage Eye is a feast for Noir eyes.
 
Barbara Baxley, as the moderately depressed woman seems to absorb her surrounding situations without coming off as being too desperate despite her personal tragedy. She and Gary Merrill trade the lines of narration. Herschel Bernardi making his moves, is convincing as the straying husband out to score.
 
What makes The Savage Eye special is that practically every frame of the film could grace the walls of a photographic art gallery in Noirsville. 7/10
 

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« Reply #16992 on: April 13, 2017, 10:36:22 AM »

Seconds (1966) A Rat Race Reboot


 
Bizarre Noir, directed by John Frankenheimer
 
Both John Randolph and Rock Hudson are excellent. The rest of the cast, some with Classic Film Noir creds, provide some cinematic memory to the film.
 
The film does an excellent job right from the get go in the Daliesque title sequence of providing the Surrealistic tone for the whole film (see above). Experimental POV camera shots disorient the viewer and draw you fully into the bizarre riff on Murder Incorporated. Paned at the time of release the film was just too ahead of it's time. A new Criterion release is available. 8/10
 

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« Reply #16993 on: April 13, 2017, 11:00:48 AM »

Seconds (1966) A Rat Race Reboot


 
Bizarre Noir, directed by John Frankenheimer
Never understood the plot on this one. Why is it the "seconds" organization does what it does? I can't see a money motive OR a political one. Just Will Geer's weird hobby?

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« Reply #16994 on: April 13, 2017, 11:45:54 AM »

Saw Charlie Chaplin's THE GOLD RUSH (first viewing; TCM).

Hilarious, as always.

Only complaint is the penultimate scene, where the shack is hanging off the mountain, goes on way too long.

Forget Michael Jackson; Charlie Chaplin invented the moonwalk! The early scene in the shack, when the wind blows the door open  Grin

The "Thanksgiving dinner" scene, in whichvthey are eating Chaplin's boot, I laughed literally harder than ever in my life. I was afraid I'd have to call a paramedic. I couldn't breathe, I thought I was going to have a heart attack  Grin Grin Grin Grin

The scene where he shovels snow from one house, dumps it in front of another, then gets paid to shovel the snow from the second, it's sort of a repeat of his gag from THE KID, where the kid breaks the window and then Chaplin gets paid to fix it

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