Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
November 19, 2017, 09:07:25 AM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Last Book You Read
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 86 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Last Book You Read  (Read 215781 times)
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2007, 05:24:48 PM »

Careful Jon, or DJ will accuse you having. . .  Shocked . . . a girlfriendGrin

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #31 on: January 17, 2007, 07:48:43 PM »

Watch out for those cooties Groggy.  I hear only a Circle Circle Dot Shot will protect you from the hyper-contagious illness.

 Wink

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12677


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #32 on: January 17, 2007, 08:16:10 PM »

I've read both the book & seen Kubrick. Wink

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1769



View Profile
« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2007, 10:10:53 PM »

'Something To Do With Death'

'Bob Dylan: The Essential Interviews'

Logged


Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre. What did you think of the script?
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12677


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #34 on: January 26, 2007, 10:04:32 PM »

I'm reading 5 books right now at the same time, Sibley's New Mexico Campaign, Paddy Graydon the "Desert Tiger", Bloody Valverde (The Battle of Valverde Ford), The Battle of Glorietta Pass, and the Civil War in The West.

Pretty much immersing my self in 1860's SW, interesting for sure.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2007, 06:17:32 AM by cigar joe » Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Tuco the ugly
Guest
« Reply #35 on: January 27, 2007, 09:26:06 AM »

nothing

Logged
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12677


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #36 on: January 27, 2007, 12:14:25 PM »

Quote
It's sole real interest to me was as a historical document of the Beat generation.

I came away with the same opinion, I just read it the first time last year. One thing that was interesting was at how cheap you could get around back then.

If you want a much better symopsis of the whole experience just listen to Tom Waits' "California Here I Come" off the Foreign Affairs album.


Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13683

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #37 on: January 27, 2007, 03:36:58 PM »

I was very disapointed with this book. "On The Road" is often listed as one of the "Great American Novels"...along with the likes of "Moby Dick", "The Great Gatsby", etc.

Turkeys all. The problem with filling The Great American Novels category is that the task is usually handed to critics who wouldn't know greatness if it were thrust up them and also there aren't any great American novels to begin with. Take it from someone who has an M.A. in Literature and has spent a lot of time reading the "greats." In case anyone wants to save some time, skip everything in the 19th Century except for selections from Poe, Hawthorne, Twain and Henry James (I'm only speaking of American writers now). In the 20th Century, you can forget everything before WWII (not counting poetry) except for James and Faulkner (and you have to be careful here: a very hit-or-miss author and his misses are wretched), and Hemingway's short stories (run, run from his novels). After the war there is a lot of good fiction, but it's mostly short form (stories of Cheever, O'Connor, Welty, others). The only great American novelist to emerge in the post-war period is Nabokov. You're really better off reading British novelists, of which there are many, many excellent ones. American novels tend to be, IMHO, in the same league with Canadian and Australian novels.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12677


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #38 on: January 27, 2007, 03:45:13 PM »

thems are fightin' words pard  Cool

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13683

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #39 on: January 27, 2007, 04:15:14 PM »

A case can be made for All The Kings Men being great or near-great. I had to read this in high school, was later assigned it in college also. I was impressed with it both times, but I have not felt the need to return to it since. It is certainly a novel well-read people should know, but should it be allowed to divert attention from worthier works by Joyce, Faulkner, Proust, to say nothing of Austen, Thackeray, Trollope, James, or Hardy? It's a difficult question, given our short life spans.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Juan Miranda
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 842


Badges?!?


View Profile
« Reply #40 on: January 27, 2007, 05:34:23 PM »

The only great American novelist to emerge in the post-war period is Nabokov.

Ermmm. Nabokov was Russian, and most of his novels were his own translations of books written origionally in Russian (though admittedly LOLITA was written in English). As for MOBY DICK, I belive he was a whale, and not a turkey.

Logged

Juan Miranda
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 842


Badges?!?


View Profile
« Reply #41 on: January 27, 2007, 05:46:47 PM »

That's why I've never picked up "Ullyses".

My fave book ever written, and the novel I've probaly read more times than any other (possibly exepting THE LONG GOODBYE). You have to work up to it gradually though. Do a bit of mind training down the mental gym. At least try DUBLINERS and PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST (where Jim really begins turning his language to the hard stuff, the toffee of the Universe) first.

Life too short? I've yet to read a book that better contains the world than ULYSSES and the 24 hours of Bloomsday. Life's to short not have read it.

FINNEGAN'S WAKE though? Still not got there, and I'm still trying on and off for a couple of decades now.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2007, 05:48:32 PM by Juan Miranda » Logged

dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13683

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #42 on: January 27, 2007, 05:55:23 PM »

Ermmm. Nabokov was Russian, and most of his novels were his own translations of books written origionally in Russian (though admittedly LOLITA was written in English). As for MOBY DICK, I belive he was a whale, and not a turkey.
The operative word here is "was." Nabokov started out a Russian, ended up a U.S. citizen. The novels Nabokov wrote in America in English (Lolita, Pale Fire, Ada, et. al.) are considered American literature. Hence the inclusion of those works in the prestigious Library of America series.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Juan Miranda
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 842


Badges?!?


View Profile
« Reply #43 on: January 27, 2007, 06:05:01 PM »

I've heard this argument made about Hitchcock and his pictures after he became an American citizen. Hate to say it, but just because he had a different stamp on his passport, he remained a greengrocer's son from from North East London and boy did he sound it. More importantly his art always betrayed his European roots as much (or some would argue as badly) as his accent.

In Nabokov's case the same could be argued, though the Russkie aristocracy where he came from always affected French manners to such an extent he is a more complex case. A book like LOLITA reads as much like a French set novel as MARY with it's outsider POV. For me his best book was INVITATION TO A BEHEADING, which could have only been written in Europe by a European.

Logged

dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13683

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #44 on: January 27, 2007, 06:13:06 PM »

Or what about comedic classics written by Joseph Heller, Kurt Vonnegut, John Kennedy Toole?  Seems like you're selling us Yanks short a bit.

You say that Nabokov is the only "great" author to emerge in the post war period.  I'd take "Slaugther-House Five" or "Catch 22" over "Lolita" any day.

As for short life spans....I'm in complete agreement.  That's why I've never picked up "Ullyses".
Perhaps it will occur to you that Lolita is not Nabokov's best novel (although it is very good). Slaughter-House 5 is not a very good novel, but it did provide the basis for a good film by George Roy Hill. Catch-22 is not a very good novel but it did provide the basis for an equally bad film which provided the opportunity for a very good audio commentary by Nichols and Soderberg on DVD.

I don't doubt that Heller and Vonnegut and Toole seem very fine to you now, but I'd be interested in hearing your opinion of them in about 20 years.

And if one were to read Joyce I would not recommend beginning with Ulysses. Better to start with Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 86 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.048 seconds with 19 queries.