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Author Topic: Last Book You Read  (Read 218865 times)
titoli
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« Reply #960 on: October 11, 2013, 06:43:15 PM »

Our history buffs might be unaware of this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ax3B4gRQNU4


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« Reply #961 on: October 11, 2013, 06:59:08 PM »

Nice find Titoli! Afro

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« Reply #962 on: October 12, 2013, 05:28:27 AM »

agree  Afro

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« Reply #963 on: October 12, 2013, 01:12:16 PM »



This is intriguing except for the finale where Japrisot mixes 3 elements of classic dénouement made famous by other authors  SPOILER

(the multiple murders to cover the important one, the multiple culprit, a policeman as main murderer).

So, if you are a casual mystery reader who hasn't anty deep knowledge of the field you might even be awed by this, otherwise you'll be disappointed like me, though entertained for a couple of hundred pages. 6\10

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« Reply #964 on: October 12, 2013, 11:09:31 PM »

Five O'Clock Lightning: Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and the Greatest Baseball Team in History, the 1927 New York Yankees, by Harvey Frommer


Giorgio de Chirico, by James Thrall Soby

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« Reply #965 on: October 13, 2013, 05:33:49 AM »

They are only linked through re-appearing characters in the LAPD and the LA underworld. They don't need to be read in any particular order (they are separate stories) though the books are in order chronologically.

I disagree.

The first one The Black Dahlia is a bit separated from the others, but the other 3 should be read in chronological order. You can read them on their own, though, but they are connected enough to have more fun with them chronologically. E.g. one of the novel's prologue could have been the last chapter of the previous novel.

I think The Big Nowhere is the perfect start to delve into Ellroy's ultra dark noir world.

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titoli
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« Reply #966 on: October 13, 2013, 05:38:13 PM »

This gave me a thrill.  Shocked

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYot5-WuAjE

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« Reply #967 on: October 17, 2013, 07:02:39 AM »

1919: Red Mirage - David J. Mitchell - Wildly overreaching book attempts, in a single 350 page volume, to examine the tumultuous events immediately following World War I: the Versailles Peace Conference, Russian Revolution, Bolshevik coup in Hungary, D'Annuzzio's coup d'etat in Fiume, the Spartacist rising in Germany, labor unrest in England and America, and many other topics. The scope is commendable but the book becomes self-defeating: Mitchell can't hope to provide anything like depth or insight, since he can only treat each topic superficially. The result is a riotous collage that's interesting, perhaps most of all as a springboard to further research, but ultimately unsatisfying.

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« Reply #968 on: October 17, 2013, 08:13:48 PM »

Wilson - A. Scott Berg - New biography of Woodrow Wilson. Very well-written but definitely a "great man" history, complete with Biblical chapter headings. Berg emphasizes Wilson's idealism, intelligence and effectiveness as a chief executive. His long passage on the Paris Peace Conference makes for great reading, with its intrinsic grasp of the personalities and stakes involved. He also dwells, perhaps excessively, on the President as drippy romantic, pouring out soppy love letters to his wives and paramours. Berger does elide over the President's more unpleasant policies (eg. his racism and taste for invading Third World countries), though he's critical of Wilson's passage of the Espionage and Sedition Acts, and the conspiracy to conceal Wilson's stroke. I doubt it will change many minds on this most controversial of Presidents, but worth reading.

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« Reply #969 on: October 19, 2013, 02:54:12 PM »

Some Spaghetti books:

10,000 Ways to Die - Alex Cox - Besides the weird theories and occasional errors noted in the other thread, this is an entertaining book by an enthusiast filmmaker. A nice overview of the genre, and Cox's candid, conversational style makes it a fun read.

Once Upon a Time in the Italian West - Howard Hughes - A good intro to the subject, though it's restricted to "great" (and well-known) films like the Dollars Trilogy, Great Silence, Django, Sollima's flicks, etc. Hughes' approach is a bit more analytical, Frayling lite perhaps.

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« Reply #970 on: October 19, 2013, 06:48:28 PM »

Perfect: Don Larsen's Miraculous World Series Game and the Men Who Made it Happen, by Lew Paper

This is basically a mini-biography of all 19 men who appeared in one of the most famous games in baseball history. Paper goes through a play-by-play of the game, and spends each half-inning with a bio of a different player. It's an interesting book. Any baseball fan will already be familiar with the professional and personal lives of stars like Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, and Jackie Robinson. But what I really liked about the book is that you also learn a little about lesser-known players, such as Andy Carey, Jim Gilliam, and Joe Collins.

I'll mention two specific interesting discussions here:

Paper does a nice job with the discussion of Enos Slaughter's motivations when he spiked Jackie Robinson in 1947. Many accused Slaughter of racism; Slaughter, however, just said he was playing the game hard (which he always did, and in fact spiked many white players in his day). Slaughter was very bitter till the end of his life over the fact that he was accused – prominently in Ken Burns's documentary – of targeting Jackie because he was black; opinions varied over the accusation, and ultimately, Paper does a nice job of telling the story and bringing all the opinions, but wisely says that ultimately, nobody can know for sure but Slaughter.

Also, Paper says that, other than pitcher Larsen and catcher Berra, every Yankee on the field that could see the final pitch (a called third-strike on pinch-hitter Dale Mitchell), agreed that it was a ball. Mitchell always swore it was high and outside. One Dodger said that years later, he met the home-plate umpire, Babe Pinelli, who had retired after that 1956 World Series, and Pinelli admitted to him that he wanted to end his career on a high note, going out on a World Series perfect game, and that in the late innings, he was calling anything close a strike. (He does not say specifically if Pinelli ever admitted that the final pitch was a ball.)

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« Reply #971 on: October 23, 2013, 06:07:17 AM »



A valuable collection of different stories and essays plus an interview.  The most important item is probably the short story La mouillette,  first published in the short-lived magazine Noir in 1954: on the same level as his best novels. Of interest his essays on argot.  I don't care about his articles on fishing, but maybe CJ would. 8\10

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« Reply #972 on: October 23, 2013, 07:52:14 AM »

Before the Fall - William Safire - Richard Nixon's chief speechwriter tries to defend him. A valuable book for allowing an inside view of the Nixon Administration: the backbiting and pettiness, the obsession with PR, Nixon's insecurities. He's sympathetic (though not uncritical) towards his old chief, trying to argue he was more principled than he let on in public or the Watergate tapes.

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« Reply #973 on: October 23, 2013, 01:57:00 PM »

The Death of Bunny Munro by Nick Cave.
Pretty shitty book, did not make me want to read more of his books. It was very monotonous and it felt at times like it was written by a 15 year old boy.

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« Reply #974 on: October 24, 2013, 10:43:54 PM »



Simonin tries to make a portrait of a criminal's life in the early '60 in the form of dialogue with one of them. The result is not as vivid as his narrative efforts and at best can be considered surpassed by the new times. 6\10

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