Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
September 30, 2022, 07:55:15 PM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Last Book You Read
0 and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 ... 81 82 [83] 84 85 ... 87
: Last Book You Read  ( 453879 )
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11454


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #1230 : March 27, 2016, 07:58:25 AM »

I can't imagine Agnew would pay a ghostwriter money for something so wretched.



Saturday nights with Groggy
titoli
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8843



« #1231 : March 27, 2016, 03:20:47 PM »

I can't imagine Agnew would pay a ghostwriter money for something so wretched.

Who said he paid him? Probably they only split the royalties. And why do you consider Hunt as only "someone"? He wasn't just "someone", one out of a million ghostwriters who could have been picked up by Agnew to write something marketed under his name (which was the only reason one would have bought the book), but one of the "plumbers". If Agnew was asked to write something the easiest option was to turn to Hunt. Or maybe it was Hunt who proposed him to market a spy under his name. Apparently, you never read anything else by Howard Hunt. Well, don't: but I did. And the description you make of the plot and "style" checks with my experience. I may be wrong, of course, but I'd bet $1000 that it went like I said. Expecially considering that Agnew's dabbling in thriller fiction ended here. And that Hunt wrote spy fiction since 1950. And kept on doing it until the new millennium.


Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11454


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #1232 : March 27, 2016, 03:55:38 PM »

Because Agnew had nothing to do with the Plumbers and probably didn't even know Hunt. Like all VPs he was, at best, on the periphery of the President's inner circle. Considering how many Nixon officials wrote their own novels and memoirs (seriously, you could fill a library with Nixon literature), it seems like a stretch to assume Hunt ghostwrote Agnew's.

What I've sampled of Hunt's work (The Coven and a few others) is bad, but in a different, formula way. He was a hack novelist with a paranoid streak. Agnew's novel is the pathetic groping of an amateur, matching the non-style of his equally bad memoir (not to mention his bizarre, alliterative speech patterns).

« : March 27, 2016, 03:58:42 PM Groggy »


Saturday nights with Groggy
titoli
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8843



« #1233 : March 27, 2016, 04:38:20 PM »

OK, I trust your judgment. It was your naming Ludlum who made me do the connection: as bad as Hunt.


Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11454


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #1234 : March 27, 2016, 04:53:28 PM »

Ludlum sucks? We can agree on that. O0



Saturday nights with Groggy
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11454


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #1235 : March 28, 2016, 06:23:31 AM »

Charles Fort: The Man Who Invented the Supernatural - Jim Steinmeyer - Good, relatively brief biography of Charles Fort, the pioneer of paranormal research. I used to enjoy Fort's oddly written collections of oddities and it was interesting to learn about the real man. He was a mild-mannered crank who never took his work more than half-seriously; I most enjoyed early chapters about his prolific career writing short fiction, his world travels (including time spent in South Africa during the Boer War) and his friendship with novelist Theodore Dreiser. If there's a criticism, it's that Steinmeyer doesn't explain what drew Fort towards the supernatural in the first place. Maybe he was just strange.



Saturday nights with Groggy
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11454


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #1236 : April 22, 2016, 08:07:45 PM »

Reading On the Track of Unknown Animals by Bernuard Heuvelmans, one of the earliest cryptozoology books. This book taught me that not only do leprechauns exist, but they live in Africa! Who knew?



Saturday nights with Groggy
moviesceleton
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3938


The glance that makes holes in the silver screen


« #1237 : April 27, 2016, 11:55:54 AM »

I recently finished Infinitine Jest by David Foster Wallace after more than a year of reading (and in English!). Mostly enjoyed it (huge chunks of it enormously) but apparently you can't write a 1000+ pages long novel without including some seriously unnecessary parts.

I guess next I'll try to finish Walden by Henry David Thoreau (in Finnish, though). I don't actually find it that good but I have this stupid habbit of not leaving books unfinished, and I'm over halfway through it...


"Once Upon a Time in America gets ten-minute ovation at Cannes"
titoli
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8843



« #1238 : April 27, 2016, 02:12:12 PM »

I guess next I'll try to finish Walden by Henry David Thoreau (in Finnish, though). I don't actually find it that good but I have this stupid habbit of not leaving books unfinished, and I'm over halfway through it...

Read it more than 30 years ago. Not as dull as Two Years before a Mast, which I just couldn't read (and I have that same habit as you), but irritating for that patronizing tone of the one who teaches people things.  As we know he let friends pay for his release from prison after his act of civil disobedience. He had little to teach.


drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9794

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #1239 : April 28, 2016, 01:02:36 PM »

One Summer: America, 1927 by Bill Bryson (2013)

Great fun to read. Though I probably couldn't describe it any better than these two reviews

WSJ: http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304066404579125211316924906


NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/24/books/review/bill-brysons-one-summer-america-1927.html?_r=0


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9794

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #1240 : May 15, 2016, 06:56:26 AM »

Beethoven: The Man Revealed, by John Suchet.

Good book. Suchet is a British radio host and Beethoven scholar. Wrote this book specifically for non-musicologists like me who have no idea how to read music; he doesn't go into any analysis of musical notes. This is a good read for someone like me, a layman who enjoys Beethoven's music. Suchet specifically says there is no new groundbreaking stuff in here, but says that there is some stuff that has never before been printed in English. He seems very knowledgeable, though of course, since the subject died almost 200 years ago, there's a lot we can't know, and Suchet therefore has to start some sentences with words like, "Beethoven must have felt ..." Or, "We can imagine how Beethoven must have felt, ... " etc. That can be  somewhat irritating, but I give credit to the author for being honest. During the times he veers from hard facts into speculation, he clearly says so.
Thankfully, Suchet does not waste endless discussion on the possible identity of the legendary Immortal Beloved; he dedicates one chapter to discussing the possible candidates and that's all. (By the way, though Suchet does not mention the movie IMMORTAL BELOVED, it seems that the movie is complete bullshit - Beethoven did have a sister-in-law whom he despised and he fought her for control of his nephew after the boy's father died, but Suchet does not mention that anyone has ever attempted to say that the sister-in-law is the Immortal Beloved, or that the nephew was really Beethoven's son - although he does say that Beethoven, who largely raised the child as his own, encouraged the boy to call him "Father." So my assumption is that the movie is complete bullshit.)

Also, Suchet does not make Beethoven out to be the maniac that others may, but he is no apologist - on things that Beethoven deserves criticism for, like his battle to take his nephew away from his sister-in-law, Suchet does not withhold criticism.

A good book.

« : May 28, 2016, 10:30:23 PM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Cusser
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1980


Remember, I always see the job through !


« #1241 : May 15, 2016, 07:03:39 AM »

The Greatest Generation, by Tom Brokaw.

Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11454


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #1242 : May 15, 2016, 07:26:00 AM »

Among other books, I've been going through a bunch of Watergate memoirs, truly the most dismal literary subgenre ever. I'll give high marks to Leonard Garment's Crazy Rhythm and Bill Safire's Before the Fall, because they weren't directly involved in the scandal and aren't trying to exculpate themselves or their boss.

There's also Hunter S. Thompson's Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, which was lots of fun.



Saturday nights with Groggy
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9794

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #1243 : May 15, 2016, 05:11:07 PM »

The Greatest Generation, by Tom Brokaw.

This is a very famous book but I don't like Tom Brokaw (surprise surprise) and I never read the book and don't plan on it.

Anyway, are you gonna tell us about it or are you just going to write the fact that you read it and that's all???  ;)


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11454


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #1244 : May 15, 2016, 06:05:55 PM »

I'm sure you'll love that I just finished a book by Dan Rather. O0



Saturday nights with Groggy
: 1 ... 81 82 [83] 84 85 ... 87  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.067160