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tucumcari bound
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« on: September 16, 2008, 04:16:15 PM »

Mountain Rivera (Anthony Quinn) is at the end of his boxing career after a knockout by Cassius Clay in the seventh round.

This is a classic boxing-based film that is stark and realistic. It's full of great actors and real-life boxing champs including then Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali), Jack Dempsey, Willie Pep, and Rory Calhoun. The film stars screen legends Jackie Gleason, Anthony Quinn, and Mickey Rooney. The film contains beautifully shot black and white cinematography and has a pretty good musical score.


« Last Edit: September 16, 2008, 04:18:18 PM by tucumcari bound » Logged



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« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2008, 09:36:58 PM »

CJ made a thread a few weeks ago on the other films section (no it doesn't belong there).
I tried the search engine but we all know it's fucking retarded.

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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2016, 04:30:48 AM »

I distinctly remembered the beginning and the end of this one, but I didn't remember it was such a crappy movie. So you have Mountain who, apparently, worked for Gleason for free. Same Gleason apparently hasn't found in his life nothing better than managing a boxer who allowed him only to share a crummy hotel room with his two pards for, supposedly, 17 years. What did they do with the money? Or they didn't earn so much money to grant at least an apartment to each one? So why carry on with fist fights? Why don't they buy a taxi and alternate 8 h. each? Rivera must be really an idiot, though he's made to speak with propriety and he's stll able to look through people. And what is wrong with wrestling? One could even say that it was more clean than boxing.  Carnera did it, with no remorse, as far as we know. And really Gleason after 17 years hasn't got the courage to tell Quinn to take a fall in the 3d? Let's not talk about Julie Harris character.  Nothing more than a tearjerker. I give it 3/10 only because the actors are all at their best, in spite of their false characters, especially Gleason (whom Stanley Kauffmann considered a non-actor after having seen The Hustler).

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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2016, 03:51:41 PM »

Another view:

Screen: 'Requiem for a Heavyweight':Anthony Quinn Stars In Serling's Drama Ralph Nelson, Director, Makes Film Debut

By A.H. WEILER
Published: October 17, 1962

SINCE its smashing arrival on television in October, 1956, "Requiem For a Heavyweight," once destined for the Broadway stage and lately published as a paperback, finally landed yesterday at the Criterion. It will begin today at the new Kips Bay and other metropolitan theaters.

The long trip has been worthwhile even though it has not proved the superiority of one medium over another. No knockout, this new film version of Rod Serling's highly praised work is a serious incisive drama that pulls no punches in its low-keyed exposure of its pitiable has been hero and the sleazy, harried sidekicks who share his sweat-stained and blood-stained world.

In making the jump from the small to the large screen, Mr. Serling and Ralph Nelson, who directed the original and is making his movie debut with "Requiem," necessarily have invited comparisons, odious though they may be. They have, to put it briefly, filled out certain areas of the TV version and changed a few others.

What remains still retains the basic, unrelenting honesty of Mr. Serling's theme—the terrible loneliness and tragic confusion of the rootless at the end of a rocky, if occasionally triumphant, road. And it glaringly reveals the shockingly seamy trade that uses people callously and wastefully. While this heavyweight does not emerge as a figure as poignant and striking as his predecessor the film nevertheless hits hard and uncompromisingly at man's inhumanity to man.

Changes have our ill-used heavyweight end up as a clownish wrestler in a climax that should leave viewers as indignant as ever. And there are other variations. Basically, however, it is still the trenchant saga of the inarticulate contender, who, after 17 years of campaigning—"I won 111 fights," he says haltingly but proudly in the wheezy voice of a man who has been hit too often—is told by a physician that he is through.

But his manager—the character has been changed somewhat here too—is in debt to gamblers whom he has crossed, and he tries to make his boy go into wrestling. This despite the fact that the fighter's devoted trainer and a solicitous unemployment counselor attempt to find him a place in life other than the ring.

Actually, Mr. Serling and his able associates, who have shot their bleak subject here-abouts in stark, and quite effective, black and white, develop their characters in shades of natural grays.

The fighter is inarticulate but his pride is obvious and speaks volumes. His manager is not an outright heel but a man cornered by the fates, who loves his heavyweight but is forced into a villain's mold. And his trainer is dog-like in his affection for the hulk of a fighting machine he has nurtured through victories and wounds. The genteel lady who tries to counsel him is seemingly out of place in this raw trio but her compassion is not.

Mr. Serling and company, to put it into a nutshell, have not set a precedent in the movies. One is reminded constantly of previous fine studies of the exploited or washed-up fistic warrior, such as "The Set-Up," "The Harder They Fall" and "Body and Soul." And, in their efforts (with the aid of Arthur J. Ornitz's fine photography) they have achieved excellent claustrophobic effects of locker rooms, cheap bars and hotel rooms and sections of dark, dirty streets.

They have captured through these images the tiny, dirty world in which their worn battler is trapped. They have been fortunate in their choice of principals.

As Mountain Rivera, Anthony Quinn, in memorable make-up including broken nose, cauliflowered ears and battered eyebrows, again is a Quasimodo-like brute who nevertheless elicits sympathy. He is not merely grotesque; he is a broken man clinging to his dignity while not quite understanding the circumstances that have brought him to the end of his fighting career. It is a genuinely striking and professionally drawn characterization.

As the manager, Jackie Gleason contributes a brilliantly underplayed role of a ruthless, yet realistic and terrified man ready to rob the dignity of the fighter to whom he is basically devoted.

Mickey Rooney's delineation of the trainer is equally restrained, and while he does not have Mr. Gleason's opportunities (except in a rummy game, in which he takes honors hands down) he, too, is sad, defeated and sentient without being lachrymose. As the spinster counselor, Julie Harris is tender and sometimes moving in a characterization that seems improbable on occasion.

Madame Spivy is unbelievable as the threatening gambler, merely leaving the odd impression of an obese lady in mannish clothes. Mr. Nelson's direction is slowly paced but generally careful, and there are quick glimpses of such fistic notables as Jack Dempsey, Cassius Clay and Paolo Rosi.

But the unanimous verdict goes to the Messrs. Quinn, Gleason and Serling. They may not have come up with the best in this genre but their "Requiem" is both a solid indictment and an often memorable view of a sordid slice of contemporary life.


REQUIEM FOR A HEAVYWEIGHT; adapted by Rod Serling, from his television play of the same name; directed by Ralph Nelson; produced by David Susskind and presented by Columbia Pictures. At the Criterion, Broadway and 45th Street, the Kips Bay Theater, Second Avenue and 31st Street, and other theaters. Running time: 85 minutes.
Mountain Rivera . . . . . Anthony Quinn
Maish Rennick . . . . . Jackie Gleason
Army . . . . . Mickey Rooney
Grace Miller . . . . . Julie Harris
Parelli . . . . . Stan Adams
Ma Greeny . . . . . Madame Spivy
Bartender . . . . . Herbie Faye
Ring Opponent . . . . . Cassius Clay
Hotel Clerk . . . . . Steve Belloise
Ring Doctor . . . . . Lou Gilbert
Referee . . . . . Arthur Mercante
and
Jack Dempsey, Paolo Rosi, Rory Calhoun, Alex Miteff, Abe Simon, Barney Ross, Willie Pep, Gus Lesnevich, J. J. Ballargeon, Michael Conrad and Stan Ross.

« Last Edit: February 20, 2016, 03:53:38 PM by cigar joe » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2016, 04:21:18 PM »

Another view:

And a superficial one, at that. This fella took the story at face value. And maybe he was even hustling for the newly released movie.

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« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2016, 06:36:34 PM »

BTW, here's the original teleplay:

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9B0h2Anklbo

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« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2016, 07:11:37 AM »



"Sport? Are you kidding? If there was headroom they'd hold these things in sewers."


The Graveyard

Director Ralph Nelson (Blood Money (1957), Once a Thief (1965), Playhouse 90 (TV Series),The Twilight Zone (TV Series)), Written by Rod Serling (teleplay) (The Twilight Zone, TV Series). The film stars Anthony Quinn (The Long Wait (1954), La Strada (1954), The Naked Street (1955), Hot Spell (1958),  Across 110th Street (1972), Jackie Gleason (The Hustler (1961)), Mickey Rooney (Quicksand (1950), The Strip (1951), Drive a Crooked Road (1954), Baby Face Nelson (1957), Julie Harris (The Haunting (1963), Harper (1966), The Split (1968)), Stanley Adams, (Hell Bound (1957) , Madame Spivy (The Fugitive Kind (1960), The Manchurian Candidate (1962)), , Lou Gilbert, real prisefighters Jack Dempsey, Paolo Rosi, and Muhammad Ali himself (as Cassius Clay).

The films initial POV and then sharp noir-ish-ly claustrophobic cinematography of trash littered side streets, stadium tunnels, lockerooms, hotel flops, hallways, bare light bulbs, and dive bars, was by Arthur J. Ornitz. Music by Laurence Rosenthal .

Requiem For A Heavyweight easily slips into Pantheon of the Great Boxing films and additionally to the select few that are also Noirs, i.e., The Set-Up (1949), Champion (1949), The Harder They Fall (1956),  Killers Kiss (1955), Bio Noir, Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), Body and Soul (1947), and Bio Neo Noir, Raging Bull (1980).

The story originally debuted as a teleplay in 1956, with Jack Palance in the lead, it also had an uplifting ending. This 1962 big screen version is decidedly darker and melancholic. The 1962 film opening sequence is a fighters bar called a "Graveyard" the denizens are glued to a TV, we hear a prisefight, this segues into a POV of the fight in progress the camera against Cassius Clay, an homage to Robert Montgomery‘s Lady In The Lake (1947), and Dark Passage (1947).

POV Sequence



Cassius Clay (Mohammad Ali)






Army (Rooney), Mountain (Quinn), Maish (Gleason)

The POV sequence comes to a close when Mountain Rivera (Quinn) see's himself reflected in a cigarette machine mirror.

The tale is of boxer, Mountain Rivera, a proud, inarticulate, fading, aging, heavyweight, past his prime, once ranked at number five, who battles in a bout with Cassius Clay (playing himself) to a tragic career ending injury. The Doc tell him he's through, another good punch and he'll be selling pencils with a tin cup. He must adjust to finding work out of the ring.

Maish: Maybe he's lucky at that, at least he walks away with his brains, that's more than most.





His cut man Army (Rooney) is heartsick for his fighter, the man he has both celebrated triumphs and nurtured wounds with. Mountain knows nothing else but prise fighting. He's never had any other job, or life for that matter outside the ring. His manager Maish (Gleason) of 17 years is desperate, he not only bet against Mountain (putting a wager of $1500 on him not lasting two rounds), but also convinced the local bookie Ma Greeny (played convincingly by Madame Spivy) who fronted him the $1500, to put up her money also. He now owes them big time, and Mountain is out of boxing. Maish has boxed himself into a corner. He's not a complete douchebag, he still feels for Mountain, but self preservation is number one.




Ma Greeny (Spivy)

While Army is helping Mountain find a job through the wanted ads, Maish is cooking up a seamy scheme with a wrestling promoter Perelli (Adams) as a way of using Mountain to payback his debt to Ma Greeny.


Pirelli (Adams) Maish (Gleason)

After a few rejections, Army takes Mountain down to the local N.Y.S. employment agency to apply for work. While there he talks to a surprisingly compassionate employment agent Grace Miller (Harris). Grace takes a special interest in Mountain fixing him up with a shot to be a councilor at a kids camp up in the Adirondacks.


Mountain (Quinn) and Grace (Miller)

Of course the prospect of Mountain working in the Adirondacks will put the kibosh on Maish's plans to keep Mountain in the ring, so he sets about sabotaging Mountain and ko'ing everything to Noirsville.

Noirsville
















Anthony Quinn as Mountain Rivera is unforgetable, as a vet of 111 fights he sports for this role, a many times broken nose, cauliflowered ears, bruised, lacerated, and smashed eyebrows, swollen cheekbones, and he talks in a raspy-wheezy voice. He clings to the only didnity he knows, the ring, but can't quite fanthom the reason he must stop.

Jakie Gleason is great as Maish the pragmatic sketchy heel who you feel a bit of empathy for, Gleason even throws fans of The Honeymooners a few bones during his card playing sequence with Mickey Rooney doing a Ralph Cramden and Ed Norton riff.

Mickey Rooney shines as the melancholy, cutman with a heart, and Julie Harris is playing her regular schtick, a spinster, (at least for me, since that is the role I've usually seen her play), albiet one with a heart of gold. Her sequences with Quinn are both touching and disheartening.

Madame Spivy, is uniquely off putting as an obese froglike lump in mans clothes who rules the bookmaking world with a cadre of goons. You get reminded of the great Shirley Stoler.

All said and done you get the feeling that the actors actually did train and fight together for 17 years, their relastionships are that believable. The screencaps are from the Columbia Pictures DVD. 10/10

« Last Edit: September 24, 2016, 09:00:24 PM by cigar joe » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2016, 08:12:46 AM »

There was already a topic. And you should know it:

http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=7752.0

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« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2016, 01:12:46 PM »

There was already a topic. And you should know it:

http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=7752.0

Not the way this search engine works  Smiley, I'll combine them

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"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
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