Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 13, 2017, 02:19:28 AM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Films of Sergio Leone
| |-+  Other Films (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rio Conchos (1964)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rio Conchos (1964)  (Read 1878 times)
Richard--W
Bandido
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


west of Hell's fringe


View Profile
« on: October 24, 2011, 05:32:05 AM »



An American western noted for its intense, prolonged and graphic violence, Rio Conchos was released in October 1964. It may have been filmed as early as 1963, before the advent of either Gunfight At Red Sands (1964 or 1965 in the USA) or A Fistful of Dollars (January 1967 in the USA) at the American box-office.

Rio Conchos started international release just as spaghetti westerns were breaking out, and before they found distribution in the USA. Therefore Rio Conchos could not have been influenced by spaghetti westerns, a widely held misconception which has been asserted here and elsewhere. More likely it influenced the Italians and Spaniards.

Here is a well-informed and articulate consideration of Rio Conchos by Livius, a blogger who really knows westerns and noirs:

http://filmjournal.net/livius/


Richard

« Last Edit: October 24, 2011, 07:48:26 AM by Richard--W » Logged

"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2987



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2011, 06:03:43 AM »

I also think that the SW had nearly zero influence on most of the US westerns of the 60 and 70s.
Apart from Eastwood's westerns, and a few other minor ones, the US westerns went their own way in developing screen violence and pessimism. If you watch several key westerns from 1960 to 1976 you can clearly see how everything developed without needing any outer influence.

I also think that the most US directors ignored the SWs completely, apart maybe from the ones by Leone. The style and themes of US westerns remained different, as was the directing of violence always very different from the European westerns.

Logged

Richard--W
Bandido
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


west of Hell's fringe


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2011, 06:27:19 AM »

I agree, Stanton. The real difference is that violence was filmed more explicitly across the pond while in the USA directors dwelled on the character's emotional ordeal of experiencing violence. American westerns were ratcheting up the hostility and sadism in the late 1950s. Look at Mann's Man of the West in 1958, deToth's Day of the Outlaw in 1959, Newman's A Thunder of Drums in 1961, and Ford's Man Who Shot Liberty Valance in 1962. Budd Boetticher's collaborations with Randolph Scott exhibited an aggression and viciousness that had not been seen before; look at The Tall T in 1957, Ride Lonesome in 1958, and Comanche Station in 1960. We take these films for granted now, but they were pushing the boundaries in the 1950s.

Sam Peckinpah said in interviews that he would never have been allowed to make The Wild Bunch in the way he did if it had not been for the acceptance of the spaghetti western in the USA. The financial success of spaghetti westerns demonstrated to studio execs that audiences found more graphic and intense violence acceptable even as they complained about it.

And there are other differences.


Richard

« Last Edit: October 24, 2011, 06:33:47 AM by Richard--W » Logged

"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.028 seconds with 19 queries.