Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 22, 2017, 03:14:03 PM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Films of Sergio Leone
| |-+  Other Films (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Canyon Passage (1946)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Canyon Passage (1946)  (Read 1779 times)
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12611


easy come easy go


View Profile
« on: January 21, 2009, 10:03:14 PM »

Watched this Western directed by Jacques Tourneur from Netflix and starring Dana Andrews, with Brian Donlevy, Susan Hayward, Ward Bond , Hoagy Carmichael, Lloyd Bridges and Andy Devine to name the most notable of the rest.  The one thing about this film is its outstanding scenery of the Pacific Northwest and pioneer times in Oregon.  Its a part of the country not seen in Westerns very often.

The film is circa 1856, and the sets are also great looking, the story is enough to keep you somewhat interested but its basically a chick flick. There is hardly any gun play but there are some good action sequences of an indian attack. Ward Bond puts in a good performance as the villain but the two main leads Andrews and Donlevy don't quite hold enough interest for me, I can see why it gets praise though, it had great production values.

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12611


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2009, 09:19:47 PM »

Forgot to mention a great set piece that depicts Portland Oregon, in a heavy downpour, its very similar to the scene from Open Range, but with much more activity, they have a horse team pulling a wagon load of logs through a very muddy street while the side gutters are very deep with planks to cross over.  Its all in color & very Pacific Nothwest-ish (especial note to dj  Afro)

« Last Edit: April 08, 2010, 09:06:38 PM by cigar joe » Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
titoli
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8010



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2010, 04:43:33 PM »

Agreed all over.

Logged

dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13635

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2016, 03:21:46 PM »

Its all in color & very Pacific Nothwest-ish (especial note to dj  Afro)
In fact, it's all in Technicolor, and the new blu from the UK sounds like just the thing: http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film5/blu-ray_reviews_73/canyon_passage_blu-ray.htm

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
Spikeopath
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 524


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2017, 01:14:48 PM »

Watched this Western directed by Jacques Tourneur from Netflix and starring Dana Andrews, with Brian Donlevy, Susan Hayward, Ward Bond , Hoagy Carmichael, Lloyd Bridges and Andy Devine to name the most notable of the rest.  The one thing about this film is its outstanding scenery of the Pacific Northwest and pioneer times in Oregon.  Its a part of the country not seen in Westerns very often.

The film is circa 1856, and the sets are also great looking, the story is enough to keep you somewhat interested but its basically a chick flick. There is hardly any gun play but there are some good action sequences of an indian attack. Ward Bond puts in a good performance as the villain but the two main leads Andrews and Donlevy don't quite hold enough interest for me, I can see why it gets praise though, it had great production values.

You under sell it!

Moi >

Any man, I suppose, who believes as I do that the human race is a horrible mistake.

Canyon Passage is directed by Jacques Tourneur and is adapted by Ernest Pascal from the novel written by Ernest Haycox. It stars Dana Andrews, Brian Donlevy, Ward Bond, Susan Hayward, Lloyd Bridges & Patricia Roc, with Hoagy Carmichael also supporting and offering up ditties such as the Oscar Nominated "Ole Buttermilk Sky". Music is by Frank Skinner and cinematography by Edward Cronjager.

More famed for his moody black & white pieces, Canyon Passage finds Tourneur operating in glorious Technicolor on Western landscapes. The result of which is as gorgeous as it is thematically sizzling. The story follows Andrews' Logan Stuart, a former scout turned store & freight owner who has landed in Jacksonsville, Oregon. Also residing here is the girl he is courting, Caroline Marsh (Roc) and his friend George Camrose (Donlevy) who plans to marry Lucy Overmire (Hayward). However, there are problems afoot as George has a serious gambling problem, one that will send this tiny town into turmoil. Affairs of the heart also come under pressure, and to cap it all off, the Indians are on the warpath after the brutish Honey Bragg (Bond) kills an innocent Indian girl.

The first thing that is so striking about Canyon Passage is the town of Jacksonville itself, this is a vastly different Western town to the ones we are used to seeing. Built in a sloping canyon that helps to pump up the off kilter feeling that breathes within the picture, it's also green, very green, but in a most visually refreshing way. The greenery and red flowers give a sense of harmony, a sneaky way of diverting the viewer from the smouldering narrative, for Tourneur is delighting in not only painting a pretty picture that belies the trouble bubbling under the surface of this apparent place of prosperity, he's also revelling in using various camera shots to embody the unfolding story and the characterisations of the principals. This really is a film that begs to be revisited a number of times, because with each viewing comes something new to appraise, to pore over to see just why Tourneur did something particular. The host of characters are varied and have meaning, each given impetus by the uniformly strong cast, the latter of which is also a testament to the supreme direction from the Parisian maestro.

I honestly feel that if this was a John Ford film it would be far better known & appraised accordingly. Because up to now it's still something of an under seen and vastly under rated Western. This in spite of it garnering praise over the last decade or so from some big hitters in the directing and film critic circles. Cronjager's Technicolor photography is rich and piercing, where Tourneur and himself expertly utilise the Diamond Lake and Umpqua National Forest exteriors to expand mood of the story. Skinner's score is excellent, as is Carmichael's (wonderfully creepy) musical input, while the costuming is top dollar. Now widely available on DVD, there's hope that more people will seek it out. With its number of finely drawn sub-plots, and its wonderful visual delights and tricks, Canyon Passage is essential viewing for Western and Tourneur purists. A film that rewards more with each viewing if you keep your eyes and ears firmly on alert. 9/10

Logged

Out you get Hooky, you done your bit.
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.036 seconds with 20 queries.