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Author Topic: True Grit (2010)  (Read 26304 times)
Jill
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« Reply #165 on: March 17, 2011, 01:46:41 PM »

Seen it finally. "Badass" is the best world to describe it, but I'm getting the book too.  Afro

Mattie totally rocks.

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« Reply #166 on: May 27, 2011, 05:40:57 PM »

Blu Grit: http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film3/blu-ray_reviews54/true_grit_blu-ray.htm

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« Reply #167 on: June 11, 2011, 10:48:59 PM »

very enjoyable.
only complaint is it took a little to long to get to the chase - 33 minutes iirc.

The Coens have double-handedly restored the Western with TG & NO COUNTRY
(meanwhile their 'regular ' films like  A SERIOUS MAN suck Cheesy

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« Reply #168 on: June 20, 2011, 02:33:45 PM »

The Blu-Ray is indeed quite impressive. Watched it with my dad yesterday. Afro

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« Reply #169 on: June 20, 2011, 03:37:17 PM »

The Blu-Ray is indeed quite impressive. Watched it with my dad yesterday. Afro
Check out the doc on Charles Portis that comes with the supplements. Very well done.

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« Reply #170 on: June 01, 2016, 07:24:35 AM »

This is a good but not great movie. I agree with most of the criticisms: the underwhelming score, the climax is rushed, Damon's character inexplicably leaving twice, the opening scenes in the town are slow and the characters weren't set up well (the courtroom scene where the Cogburn character was introduced was just plain bad).

I just wished there would have been more of a journey. While I haven't read the book, the scenes in the town don't really work outside of the negotiation scene. Cogburn could have been introduced in a more clever way as well.

I also didn't like some of the dialogue and don't care for the Coen's obsession with dialect/accent/language - there was also too much era specific dialogue, it was overdone. Bridges was good but I definitely prefer Wayne's performance.

This might be the only instance where I don't have a preference between the original and a remake.

8/10

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« Reply #171 on: June 05, 2016, 06:11:07 AM »

I thought I was the only one stalling with this.

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« Reply #172 on: June 05, 2016, 07:40:51 AM »

I have not seen this (yet). I did not like the John Wayne version. If this one is definitely better, maybe I'll give it a try.

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« Reply #173 on: June 05, 2016, 08:47:03 AM »

I just wished there would have been more of a journey. While I haven't read the book, the scenes in the town don't really work outside of the negotiation scene. Cogburn could have been introduced in a more clever way as well.
The first half of the book is spent in town, the second, on the trail. I think the Hathaway version gets the mix right. Needless to say, intro-ing Cogburn in "the jakes" was an invention of the Coens.

Quote
I also didn't like some of the dialogue and don't care for the Coen's obsession with dialect/accent/language - there was also too much era specific dialogue, it was overdone.
My objection here is that the Coens eliminate a bunch of Portis's language just so they can add back in their own ersatz version. They think they can write this stuff as well as the original novelist but they are self-deceived. Hathaway uses a lot of lines taken directly from the book. Every year I have some of my students read the novel and then we watch Hathaway with the English subtitles turned on and they get to see the words they've read spoken. I don't know if they get anything out of it, but it always gives me a kick.

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« Reply #174 on: June 05, 2016, 10:35:43 AM »

Needless to say, intro-ing Cogburn in "the jakes" was an invention of the Coens...

... and may be the best scene of the movie. Ok, the attorney clearly steals the show, which isn't good for the film but great for the scene. Nobody writes courtrooms scenes like the Coens (eventhough Better Call Saul comes dangerously close sometimes). Nobody lights a courtroom like Deakins. Nobody plays at attorney better than someone who's directed by the Coens.

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« Reply #175 on: June 05, 2016, 10:49:02 AM »

... and may be the best scene of the movie.
It's one of those clever scenes that works well on its own but in the flow of the film disrupts things. It should have been edited out and used as a deleted scene for the Blu-ray.

The courtroom scene is largely taken from Portis.

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« Reply #176 on: June 05, 2016, 10:55:09 AM »

It's one of those clever scenes that works well on its own but in the flow of the film disrupts things. It should have been edited out and used as a deleted scene for the Blu-ray.

THat may be true.
I think the idea was to paint Jeff Bridge as brutal and off the book but that's not what it does.

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« Reply #177 on: June 05, 2016, 11:46:38 AM »

The first half of the book is spent in town, the second, on the trail. I think the Hathaway version gets the mix right. Needless to say, intro-ing Cogburn in "the jakes" was an invention of the Coens.

My objection here is that the Coens eliminate a bunch of Portis's language just so they can add back in their own ersatz version. They think they can write this stuff as well as the original novelist but they are self-deceived. Hathaway uses a lot of lines taken directly from the book. Every year I have some of my students read the novel and then we watch Hathaway with the English subtitles turned on and they get to see the words they've read spoken. I don't know if they get anything out of it, but it always gives me a kick.

While I wasn't crazy about some of the era specific dialogue in the original, it was certainly better, so what you shared makes a lot of sense. I also forgot to mention that I couldn't understand a fair amount of Bridges' dialogue due to all of the mumbling. It was a decent touch to the performance but overdone.

... and may be the best scene of the movie. Ok, the attorney clearly steals the show, which isn't good for the film but great for the scene. Nobody writes courtrooms scenes like the Coens (eventhough Better Call Saul comes dangerously close sometimes). Nobody lights a courtroom like Deakins. Nobody plays at attorney better than someone who's directed by the Coens.

Courtroom scenes are very TV/stagey by nature and are basically inherently flawed. Also, that specific scene gave nothing but information to the viewer in an amateurish manner. It's a pretty nasty violator of the show-don't-tell philosophy of filmmaking.

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« Reply #178 on: June 05, 2016, 12:01:20 PM »

Courtroom scenes are very TV/stagey by nature and are basically inherently flawed. Also, that specific scene gave nothing but information to the viewer in an amateurish manner. It's a pretty nasty violator of the show-don't-tell philosophy of filmmaking.

It's a good thing filmmaking accepts several completely distinct philosophies. Most masterpieces have broken all kinds of rules. I'd say that filmmaking can use any other medium or rule, but also laugh at them exactly how it wants as long as it works. I've seen silent movies that are absolute masterpieces, I've cried all I had while watching the flashback sequence from UP, but I've also cried, laughed and been mesmerized by close ups of talking heads in many other films (Blade Runner, The Social Network, Vertigo, OUATIA...).

Last but not least, I think you're pretty harsh with that particular scene, which, although flawed in the way it's used in the film, is absolutely greatly directed. The decoupage, while not very inventive (who cares) is very precise and impressive. For instance, I love the way we slowly turn around Bridge from Mattie's standpoint to slowly take a glimpse of him. One of the greatest (and utterly cinematic) introductions of a character in recent memory.

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« Reply #179 on: June 06, 2016, 12:16:37 PM »

It's a good thing filmmaking accepts several completely distinct philosophies. Most masterpieces have broken all kinds of rules. I'd say that filmmaking can use any other medium or rule, but also laugh at them exactly how it wants as long as it works. I've seen silent movies that are absolute masterpieces, I've cried all I had while watching the flashback sequence from UP, but I've also cried, laughed and been mesmerized by close ups of talking heads in many other films (Blade Runner, The Social Network, Vertigo, OUATIA...).

Last but not least, I think you're pretty harsh with that particular scene, which, although flawed in the way it's used in the film, is absolutely greatly directed. The decoupage, while not very inventive (who cares) is very precise and impressive. For instance, I love the way we slowly turn around Bridge from Mattie's standpoint to slowly take a glimpse of him. One of the greatest (and utterly cinematic) introductions of a character in recent memory.

I'm all for directors breaking convention, but the show-don't-tell rule isn't really a rule per se as it is an overall philosophy on how 'moving pictures' are made. That doesn't mean talking head scenes don't have their place in movies, a scene like the interrogation in Blade Runner is fantastic, but it's not generically spouting off information about the main character. There is also no tension in the court room scene, the lawyer isn't a character in the film and is simply there just to read you information.

With that said, it's a technically well made scene, but how many Roger Deakins shot scenes aren't (especially with talented directors)? I also don't think I'm being overly harsh. I can be very forgiving about talkie scenes which are there for exposition purposes. For example the scene in Escape From New York where Lee Van Cleef's character reads off Snake's rap sheet; it's sort of the same thing but a huge difference: LVC is an important character and it's setting up their relationship, you don't know if Russell's character will accept and they're discussing a very interesting scenario. There is also an underlying tension in the scene where something can happen...

Now compare that to a banal court scene where a lawyer, who isn't a character in a movie, is simply giving the audience information in the most boring way possible for 5-7 minutes (?). Now compare that to a scene where the Cogburn character simply deals with a criminal in an incredibly harsh and unprofessional manner which can tell you almost everything about his character in as little as 30 seconds.

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