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Author Topic: Mortimer and Indio  (Read 14904 times)
Colonel Günther Ruiz
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« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2009, 01:34:38 PM »

Indio, a poor half-Mexican half-Indian kid is working as a stable boy on a estate somewhere in North or West Carolina. The proprietor, a rich Northern businessman named Mortimer, thinks of himself as a good Christian, and lets the poor boy live with him and his family, but is in fact a bigot just like everybody else. While the boy is permitted to stay on the property during the night, he isn't allowed to eat at the same table or live under the same roof with Mortimer's family: his beautiful (and much younger) wife, his daughter (that is the same age as Indio), and his son (that is just about to leave them in order to join the army, to make his father proud and happy). Indio, grateful that he has somewhere to live and work in first place, doesn't pay much attention to all that at first, but, as time passes he slowly befriends Mortimer's daughter. The possession is remote and there aren't many things to do for young people. The kids ride horses together and soon find themselves in love. The furious Mortimer arranges to put Indio in jail, under false accuse. Indio spends a couple of years in jail, doing everything in his power to stay clean, hoping one day he can return to the property, hoping everything is just a mistake, hoping Mortimer wouldn't play him out like that... After serving his time he attempts to return to W/N Carolina but only to find out that Mortimer's daughter changed; under her father's influence she turned into a bigot just like him, and she's waiting to get married with this good town boy, from a decent family. Unfortunately, the old Mortimer and his wife died during the time Indio was in jail, so there is no way for Indio, now a man, to reverse what happened, and maybe win Mortimer's daughter back. Maddened, he turns to violence and crime, culminating the night when the women he loves kills herself just so he can't have her. Nor her body, nor her mind. Indio, disappointed in love and life in general flees down South, slowly becoming addicted to Locoweed (rolled into corn husk), that helps him alleviate the pain, and engaging in a strange, amor platonicus-like and very complex relationship with Nino, a half-Guinean half-Colombian opium smuggler, and his notorious band.

For A Few Dollars More II:  Indio's Story, will return after this commercial break.

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« Reply #16 on: May 25, 2009, 04:21:02 PM »

How about Till Infidelity Do Us Part: The Story of Indio?

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Colonel Günther Ruiz
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« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2009, 04:37:08 PM »

How about Till Infidelity Do Us Part: The Story of Indio?

"Only on Lifetime."

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« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2009, 06:45:41 PM »

Well, I must admit that I did use the Lifetime Movie Title Generator for that one...

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Colonel Günther Ruiz
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« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2009, 07:20:48 PM »

Well, I must admit that I did use the Lifetime Movie Title Generator for that one...

 Grin

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Dust Devil
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« Reply #20 on: May 26, 2009, 02:59:13 AM »

I could come up with tons of cheap shit like that.

The saddest thing is that if I was in the business, I'd probably be one of the best paid screenwriters working today.

« Last Edit: May 26, 2009, 06:26:53 AM by Dust Devil » Logged



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« Reply #21 on: May 26, 2009, 07:21:33 AM »

Well, you'd better have connections, Tuco... Wink

Here's another prospective title...

I Woke Up Emaciated: The True Story of Indio Cheesy

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« Reply #22 on: May 26, 2009, 07:41:17 AM »

Indio, a poor half-Mexican half-Indian kid is working as a stable boy on a estate somewhere in North or West Carolina. The proprietor, a rich Northern businessman named Mortimer, thinks of himself as a good Christian, and lets the poor boy live with him and his family, but is in fact a bigot just like everybody else. While the boy is permitted to stay on the property during the night, he isn't allowed to eat at the same table or live under the same roof with Mortimer's family: his beautiful (and much younger) wife, his daughter (that is the same age as Indio), and his son (that is just about to leave them in order to join the army, to make his father proud and happy). Indio, grateful that he has somewhere to live and work in first place, doesn't pay much attention to all that at first, but, as time passes he slowly befriends Mortimer's daughter. The possession is remote and there aren't many things to do for young people. The kids ride horses together and soon find themselves in love. The furious Mortimer arranges to put Indio in jail, under false accuse. Indio spends a couple of years in jail, doing everything in his power to stay clean, hoping one day he can return to the property, hoping everything is just a mistake, hoping Mortimer wouldn't play him out like that... After serving his time he attempts to return to W/N Carolina but only to find out that Mortimer's daughter changed; under her father's influence she turned into a bigot just like him, and she's waiting to get married with this good town boy, from a decent family. Unfortunately, the old Mortimer and his wife died during the time Indio was in jail, so there is no way for Indio, now a man, to reverse what happened, and maybe win Mortimer's daughter back. Maddened, he turns to violence and crime, culminating the night when the women he loves kills herself just so he can't have her. Nor her body, nor her mind. Indio, disappointed in love and life in general flees down South, slowly becoming addicted to Locoweed (rolled into corn husk), that helps him alleviate the pain, and engaging in a strange, amor platonicus-like and very complex relationship with Nino, a half-Guinean half-Colombian opium smuggler, and his notorious band.


Did you read The house of the spirits by Isabel Allende? Something quite similar happens in it between the daughter of the rich landowner and the kid son of his farmer. Beyond the ironic cliche of that hypothetical plot, I guess that the girl could really represent somebody who was important in Indio's life, considering he still recalls the episode in such an obsessive way after years,  in those hallucinated nightmares.

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« Reply #23 on: May 26, 2009, 01:23:03 PM »

Did you read The house of the spirits by Isabel Allende? Something quite similar happens in it between the daughter of the rich landowner and the kid son of his farmer. Beyond the ironic cliche of that hypothetical plot, I guess that the girl could really represent somebody who was important in Indio's life, considering he still recalls the episode in such an obsessive way after years,  in those hallucinated nightmares.

No, never read that one. Honestly, I was thinking of Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, and a couple of telenovelas. But as I said, it's just huge pile of rehashed clichés, elements of once interesting and challenging ''young romance went wrong'' love plots, on which basically every love story/movie strives nowadays.

However, I agree with you, for some reason Colonel Mortimer's sister is very important to Indio. We can't know for sure why is so, it's not explained in the movie, but we can always speculate. And have some fun in the process.

What is more interesting to me is Colonel Mortimer and his revenge quest, and what preceded it. OK, he's there to avenge his sister, but what's behind, was his career in the army clean? And things like that.

Maybe I'll write it one of these days... but not today, it's too damn hot. See you after the commercials.

« Last Edit: May 26, 2009, 01:30:55 PM by Dust Devil » Logged



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« Reply #24 on: May 26, 2009, 04:02:22 PM »

in those hallucinated nightmares.
Why do you use the term "nightmare"? Indio clearly enjoys the memory. That's why he smokes the weed; it helps him remember.

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« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2009, 04:23:41 AM »

No, never read that one. Honestly, I was thinking of Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, and a couple of telenovelas. But as I said, it's just huge pile of rehashed clichés, elements of once interesting and challenging ''young romance went wrong'' love plots, on which basically every love story/movie strives nowadays.

However, I agree with you, for some reason Colonel Mortimer's sister is very important to Indio. We can't know for sure why is so, it's not explained in the movie, but we can always speculate. And have some fun in the process.

What is more interesting to me is Colonel Mortimer and his revenge quest, and what preceded it. OK, he's there to avenge his sister, but what's behind, was his career in the army clean? And things like that.

Maybe I'll write it one of these days... but not today, it's too damn hot. See you after the commercials.

You are right, mine is just one of uncountable examples we can do, literature and cinema are full of that kind of stuff.
Definitely it's fun to speculate on it but I'm not so good in the matter, so I am looking forward to your "Colonel Mortimer Story": I have a great consideration of him, so please don't destroy my hero...

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« Reply #26 on: May 27, 2009, 04:49:41 AM »

Why do you use the term "nightmare"? Indio clearly enjoys the memory. That's why he smokes the weed; it helps him remember.

Do you think so? Why should he force himself to remember such a tragic episode?
I have also seen it in an opposite way. That scene returns to his mind against his will, always the same scene and only that one...that's why I believe that Mortimer's sister was somebody very important to him. And that Indio wasn't just a fierce serial killer and raper, at least before that episode.
And the weed is just something he uses to ease his pain and remorse.
Of course I can be wrong...

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« Reply #27 on: May 27, 2009, 11:42:28 AM »

Let's see what the SL Encyclopedia has to say on the subject of "Indio":

Quote
How to read his final moments? One interpretation: when he closes his hand around the watch, he is affirming receipt of a prize long sought. Why is the watch, and the memory it evokes, so important to Indio? What is the longing at the heart of his obsession? It would be hard to argue that the dead girl is the chief object of interest; he may not have even known her. It can't be regret, either for what happened to the girl or for his unfulfilled lust. Indio is incapable of regret. The failed rape is the defining moment in Indio's life. He had intended to deliver the girl to la petite mort, but she chose its greater cousin instead. Ever after, Indio has been obsessed with death, following it, watching it in the eyes of those he kills. After this prolonged flirtation, MORTimer, with il Monco officiating, brings Indio to the point of consumation.

Of course, for all intents and purposes, *I* am the SL Encyclopedia, but I don't see that that's any reason to disregard this very elegant bit of criticism.

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« Reply #28 on: May 27, 2009, 01:36:48 PM »

yes and elegant it is  Afro

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« Reply #29 on: May 28, 2009, 07:35:15 AM »

Of course, for all intents and purposes, *I* am the SL Encyclopedia, but I don't see that that's any reason to disregard this very elegant bit of criticism.

"If I don't compliment myself, nobody will do it for me."

Well, it's a good one. On the other hand, it's only one, and this thread proves that there are other possible understandings. I think the best part is, most of them can't be proven really wrong. Maybe only less or more wrong. Grin

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