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| | |-+  Nuovo Cinema Paradiso aka Cinema Paradiso (1988)
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Author Topic: Nuovo Cinema Paradiso aka Cinema Paradiso (1988)  (Read 10872 times)
drinkanddestroy
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« Reply #45 on: November 16, 2017, 11:07:27 PM »

Yes you absolutely have to watch both - it's still all directed by Tornatore; ergo well-worth watching - but just in the correct order.


I watched the longer first; so the shorter is ruined for me. Maybe I will wait 10 years until I forget it all, then watch the shorter one  Wink

Btw, my understanding is that the original Italian release (and flop) was 155 minutes. I presume this was Tornatore’s preferred version, though I have no idea whether he had Final Cut or if it was the studio that chose it. Anyway, then Harvey Weinstein released the 124-min. version in USA to great acclaim (Best Foreign Picture Oscar), and later on released the 174, calling it the “Director’s Cut.” I really don’t know anything about the movie’s history or Tornatore’s preference, or whether he had any involvement in assembling either of Weinstein’s cuts. But suppose Tornatore assembled and released the 155MV in Italy and had nothing to do with either the 124MV or the 174MV. Perhaps the only true “Director’s Cut” is the 155MV?

As an aside, is the 155MV available anywhere on disc today?

p.s. Is there any record of a Leone comment on this movie?

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« Reply #46 on: November 17, 2017, 08:24:17 PM »

I've never seen the 155min version but apparently it was structurally similar to the "Director's Cut" - i.e. in 3 parts rather than 2. Here's a brief Variety review of it:

http://variety.com/1987/film/reviews/nuovo-cinema-paradiso-1200427509/

I guess Leone was still alive at the time - I like to think he would have appreciated it.

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« Reply #47 on: November 18, 2017, 03:50:02 PM »

I've never seen the 155min version but apparently it was structurally similar to the "Director's Cut" - i.e. in 3 parts rather than 2. Here's a brief Variety review of it:

http://variety.com/1987/film/reviews/nuovo-cinema-paradiso-1200427509/

I guess Leone was still alive at the time - I like to think he would have appreciated it.

Thanks.

Does the 124-minute version have anything about the teenaged Toto? Or is that part completely cut?

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« Reply #48 on: December 01, 2017, 06:21:39 AM »

This was on Turner Classics recently, so I DVR'd it; just finished watching it yesterday.  This was 124 minute version with English subtitles.
 
I liked it, score reminded me of Once/America.


Does the 124-minute version have anything about the teenaged Toto? Or is that part completely cut?

Yes, had segment of teenage Toto, how he had the huge crush/relationship with the banker's nice daughter, who later went to school in Palermo.

I liked the scene where blind Alfredo put his hand over young Toto's face, and when he removed it, the face was of teenaged Toto (and Alfredo's shirt was different too).

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« Reply #49 on: December 04, 2017, 08:31:12 AM »

I liked it, score reminded me of Once/America.

I think Tornatore has a very similar style of filming to Leone - both in terms of pure visuals and also how they integrate Morricone's music. Although their films are different in content, Tornatore really seems to me to have taken up Leone's mantle. I think this is most particularly the case with my favorite Tornatore film "The Legend of the Pianist on the Ocean" (starring Tim Roth as "Danny Boodman T.D. Lemon Novecento") where the back and forth between the dueling pianos evokes a protracted Leone style duel although now the protagonists are actually playing the music themselves.

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