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Author Topic: Northwest Passage (1940)  (Read 418 times)
titoli
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« on: December 05, 2016, 08:58:03 AM »

Were it not for the end I'd give it 9/10. As it is I give it a solid 8/10. A real surprise as I had always skipped it when constantly programmed on tv. The story of the raid on the Indian-French camp is masterful, the attack on the camp itself breathtaking. Tracy is at the top of his anonimity, indistinguishable from the landscape.

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« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2016, 04:21:24 PM »

Were it not for the end I'd give it 9/10. As it is I give it a solid 8/10. A real surprise as I had always skipped it when constantly programmed on tv. The story of the raid on the Indian-French camp is masterful, the attack on the camp itself breathtaking. Tracy is at the top of his anonimity, indistinguishable from the landscape.

Too bad it wasn't quite factual.

The novel the book was based on used details from the French attack on Ft. Oswego in 1756, François-Pierre de Rigaud lead some men across the river upstream from the fortifications, and these men, who made an unopposed crossing under somewhat difficult conditions exactly as depicted in the film, appeared on the edge of the clearing outside Fort Oswego about the same time that Colonel Mercer was struck and killed by a French shell. After a short council Lieutenant Colonel John Littlehales, who took over command from Mercer, raised the white flag.

On October 4, 1759. Rogers and about 140 men entered the village of St. Francis, which was reportedly occupied primarily by women, children, and the elderly, early that morning, slaughtered many of the inhabitants where they lay, shot down many who attempted to flee, and then burned the village. Rogers reported killing as many as 300 people, while French reports placed the number closer to thirty, mainly women and children. One of Rogers' men was killed, and seven were wounded. Chased by the French and vengeful Indians, and short on rations, Rogers and his men returned to Crown Point via the Connecticut River valley. Missteps in caching food stores for the expedition's use led to starvation, and some of Rogers' men were reportedly driven to cannibalism in order to survive. About one third of the raid's participants did not return.

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« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2016, 10:56:10 PM »

Too bad it wasn't quite factual.



Who cares? But a remake would be in order were it not that you can't expect it from PC hollywood.

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« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2016, 12:41:10 PM »

Meowww, 2 hours long... Undecided

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« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2017, 06:31:17 AM »

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032851/reference

Rogers And His Jolly Green Rangers.

Northwest Passage is directed by King Vidor and adapted to screenplay by Laurence Stallings and Talbot Jennings from the Kenneth Roberts novel of the same name. It stars Spencer Tracy, Robert Young and Walter Brennan. Music is by Herbert Stothart and cinematography by William V. Skall and Sidney Wagner.

"This is a story of our early America….of the century of conflict with French and Indians….when necessity made simple men, unknown to history, into giants in daring and endurance. It begins in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in 1759…."

Hurrah! What with the film having a reputation as one of the greatest adventure films of all time, that opening salvo for Vidor's movie doubly whets the appetite.What follows is more a case of a visually great picture, dotted with action, that is more about actual heroes than heroic deeds. Certainly the first hour of the picture leans more towards the slow burn than anything raising the pulse. However, characters are well drawn by Vidor and his team, with quality performances to match from the leads, and when the action dose come, such as the excellent battle at the Abenaki village, they more than pay back the patience of the viewer. We need to be forgiving for the overtly racist fervour that permeates the plot, so instead just rejoice in men triumphing over many obstacles, both of the mind and the body. 7/10

Beware of poor DVD transfers...

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