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Author Topic: "Deadwood" (2004-2006)  (Read 24977 times)
cigar joe
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« Reply #90 on: July 15, 2007, 11:27:45 AM »

no problemo!

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Amaze
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I don't see any method at all, sir.


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« Reply #91 on: September 24, 2010, 01:29:07 PM »

Thought you might enjoy this:

http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=205920&id=588254251&l=31a325f241

Someone visited Melody Ranch where the deadwood set is still standing.


"All the sets seem to be, though a bit rough and seasoned, ready to be called back into action. I have seen auctions of some of the costumes, though.
there is once picture of E.B.'s hotel in that set, and it looks like they filled in the part Hearst smashed out with a window and changed the roofline (there used to be a more elaborate circular splay of wood feature up there too)."

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Tex
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« Reply #92 on: February 25, 2013, 11:50:57 AM »

Deadwood is definitely in my top 5, may top 3, favorite shows. As luck would have it, I got introduced to the show at a time when I was reading a lot of Shakespeare. While I don't like to compare, Milch is at least a kindred spirit. The dialogue is really what makes the show for me.

For anyone who owns the season 1 DVDs I recommend checking out Keith Carradine's interview with David Milch. Very interesting discussion of the American Western and its origins, particularly the origin of the upstanding, silent hero.

By the way, anyone know what ever happened to the movie projects?

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Tex
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« Reply #93 on: February 26, 2013, 12:03:01 PM »

Just rewatched that interview. Here are some of the most interesting points made by Milch.

Origin of the show - Milch's project was to explore the idea that men, when they find themselves without a sovereign system of law and order, impose some sort of order upon themselves. The original pitch to HBO was for a show about city cops in Nero's Rome. Unfortunately for Milch at the time (but fortunately for we western-philes), HBO told him sorry, but they were already working on a Rome show. So he returned with essentially the same show exploring the same themes but in a different venue, Deadwood.

Language, vulgar and eloquent - As for the vulgarity, Milch states that "It's very well documented that the obscenity of the West was striking but the obscenity in mining camps was unbelievable." He goes on to say that just as gorillas beat their chests to avoid having to fight all the time, so did the man of the rough and tough west cuss up a storm. It was a way of announcing his presence as a tough customer without having to tear it up with his fellow man.
The other side of the coin is the eloquent language. Those who were educated at the time were educated by the Victorian novels. The two worlds collide in the West where men of letters rise to power only when they are able to verbally beat their chests, Al being the prime example.

You'll notice that the characters who routinely get violent physically are not the most eloquent characters. And those who get the tar beat out of them are not the most obscene speakers (The dandy from NY, EB, Hugo Jarry the Yankton commissioner). You need both to survive in Deadwood. Wu in an interesting case in this regard. Among the Chinese he is a boss, but among the English speakers, he must rely on Al to supply more than just the obscenity he has soaked up.

Cigar Joe has pointed out that there is a surprising lack of shootouts. This is perhaps due to the verbal chest beating that goes on. However I would add that when things do get violent, man, do they get violent!

The Western genre as we know it - Keith Carradine mentions that it is hard to consider this a Western along side the traditional American Western. On this, Milch says some very interesting things. He says that the old westerns reflected the Hays production code (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_Picture_Production_Code) much more than they reflected reality. So in the restricting environment of Hollywood, the successful writers were the ones who could build a story, nay a world, within those confines. According to Milch this is exactly what the early American Western did. It's hard to make a realistic gangster movie under such restrictions. You end up with mob bosses who say things like "Gee whiz" "Watch it, mister" and "Go kiss a duck". So Milch says, "If characters can't say anything obscene, you try and conceive a character for whom obscenity is a kind of fallen or pathetic expression of weakness. I believe that was the source of the development of the laconic cowboy." He "didn't have to f*** with the Hays code, 'cause he didn't talk a lot."

« Last Edit: February 26, 2013, 12:39:35 PM by Tex » Logged
cigar joe
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« Reply #94 on: February 26, 2013, 02:50:04 PM »

It reminds me of the joke in Blazing Saddles about "genuine frontier gibberish" reflecting the Hayes Code influence.

examples:

Auw Shoot
Auw Shucks
Jumpin' Jehoshaphat
What in tarnation
Goll darn it

I'm sure we can come up with more  Wink

« Last Edit: February 26, 2013, 02:52:20 PM by cigar joe » Logged

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« Reply #95 on: February 26, 2013, 02:56:43 PM »

It reminds me of the joke in Blazing Saddles about "genuine frontier gibberish" reflecting the Hayes Code influence.

examples:

Auw Shoot
Auw Shucks
Jumpin' Jehoshaphat
What in tarnation
Goll darn it

I'm sure we can come up with more  Wink


Yosemite Sam is a good source.  Afro

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