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Author Topic: The Proposition (2005)  (Read 33725 times)
Juan Miranda
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« Reply #30 on: March 26, 2006, 07:07:16 PM »

What have the reviews been saying about it?

I no longer pay any attention to professional film reviewers, and I stopped buying film magazines about 5 years ago. From my circle of friends, I don't know anybody who's had a bad word to say about it. Not often you can say that about anything. Even my usually Western averse female chums have loved it, or are keen to see it.

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« Reply #31 on: March 26, 2006, 07:59:17 PM »

I no longer pay any attention to professional film reviewers, and I stopped buying film magazines about 5 years ago. From my circle of friends, I don't know anybody who's had a bad word to say about it. Not often you can say that about anything. Even my usually Western averse female chums have loved it, or are keen to see it.

I agree with what you say about the critics. But it is always interesting to hear what they have to say about a film. I'll see if I can find a review of the film and put a link up here.

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« Reply #32 on: March 26, 2006, 08:10:56 PM »

Here is a reviewer that enjoyed it. That poster is real nice, reminds me of Franco Nero in "Keoma".


http://www.filmfocus.co.uk/review.asp?reviewID=20632

Also I was not aware that it took place in The land down under's "wild west". This should be very interesting.

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« Reply #33 on: March 27, 2006, 02:11:31 PM »

I don't think it was mentioned in this thread yet (although I guess atleast some of you should know about it already), the Proposition is already out on DVD http://www.xploitedcinema.com/dvds/dvds.asp?title=7314 if you don't want to wait until theatrical release. Wink

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« Reply #34 on: March 27, 2006, 07:31:28 PM »

  Well, now I know what the trailer meant by "grisly violence."   Shocked

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« Reply #35 on: April 23, 2006, 12:32:25 PM »

Sorry if this had been discussed already, but has anyone here seen the fantastic Aussie western titled "The Proposition".
It is the finest western in years, and a very fresh approach to the genre.

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« Reply #36 on: April 23, 2006, 01:27:38 PM »

Sorry if this had been discussed already, but has anyone here seen the fantastic Aussie western titled "The Proposition".
It is the finest western in years, and a very fresh approach to the genre.


it should be coming to the states later in the summer I hear.
They are selling it on xploited cinema but I am not about to buy something I have never seen(unless it is a spaghetti western of course Wink )

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« Reply #37 on: April 24, 2006, 02:55:11 PM »

i really want to see it, because i'm a big Nick Cave fan anyway.  But it didn't get shown in my hometown.

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« Reply #38 on: April 24, 2006, 02:57:55 PM »


it should be coming to the states later in the summer I hear.



so is it opt for the summer for us Yanks or what?

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« Reply #39 on: April 24, 2006, 05:08:31 PM »

There's another thread about it here:

http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=2291.0

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« Reply #40 on: May 09, 2006, 09:21:16 AM »

Missed this (out fishing)

Family Ties and Australian History, Both Soaked in Blood, in 'The Proposition'
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By MANOHLA DARGIS
Published: May 5, 2006
The teeth are yellow in the Australian western "The Proposition," and the sky is as red as blood. Directed by John Hillcoat from a screenplay by the darkly moody musician and author Nick Cave, the film tells a story of murder in the outback that is as cruel as it is aesthetically flamboyant. Here flies swarm over the living and the dead with equal attention, perhaps because one doesn't really seem all that different from the other. In the late 19th century, warm flesh and cold meat each appear fairly rancid under the glare of the hot Australian sun, or at least when caught in the similarly pitiless gaze of these filmmakers.

Skip to next paragraph
Enlarge This Image
 
Kerry Brown/First Look Pictures
Guy Pearce portrays Charlie Burns, an outlaw in the Australian outback, in the dark western "The Proposition," written by Nick Cave.

Readers’ Opinions
Forum: Movies
The wide open spaces and roughneck history of modern Australia, including the wholesale slaughter of the continent's native peoples, make the country a natural setting for a western. Not surprisingly, given Mr. Cave's fondness for the baroquely macabre (one of his recent CD's is titled "Abattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus"), "The Proposition" takes a jaundiced view of the frontier. That's particularly true of the white settlers, who in both their tooth decay and moral rot come across as more desperate than even Sam Peckinpah's most colorful desperadoes, and who appear fairly indistinguishable no matter on what side of the law they travel. Mr. Cave left Australia years ago, but his native country's penal-colony origins and mysterious beauty have clearly retained a strong grip on his imagination.

Given that "The Proposition" tells something of a national-foundation story, there's a primal, almost biblical tint to its parts. Guy Pearce plays Charlie Burns, who, after riding in an outlaw gang alongside his older brother, Arthur (Danny Huston), is imprisoned by the reform-minded Captain Stanley (a magnificent Ray Winstone). The captain cuts Charlie loose after presenting him with the proposal of the film's title: either Charlie kills Arthur by Christmas, which is fast approaching, or Stanley will hang their teenage brother, a simpleton called Mikey (Richard Wilson). Fortified by alcohol, Charlie rides into the outback, looking for his older brother, a butcher of men whom the Aborigines liken to a dog; fortified by love for his wife, Martha (Emily Watson), the captain uneasily remains behind.

As this lineup suggests, the cast of "The Proposition" is reason enough to see the film. Mr. Huston has carved out his own screen niche as a creepy-crawler, and while his character is at once underconceived and overbaked, given to spouting verse like the poetic creation he is, the actor makes him a wonderfully substantial presence, whether galloping across a plain or sitting Buddha-like in front of the sinking sun. There is something heavy and monumental about the way Mr. Huston takes up film space (in this he can recall his father, John Huston), which makes a nice counterpart to the otherworldly Mr. Pearce, a performer of such apparent delicate physicality and eerie grace that you half expect him to be carried off by the wind.

Both actors are memorable, as is Mr. Winstone, whose surprising, occasionally eccentric performance provides "The Proposition" with some of its finest moments. Sweat pouring off his thick body, matting his hair and spotting his uniform, Captain Stanley seems like a man perpetually out of his element, whether he's squirming under his wife's touch or trying to bring his brutish men to heel.

Boiling over with rage and choked by despair, he appears trapped in existential impotence, yet wages war at everything and everyone around him: his men, the town, the outlaws, his wife, even his own body. Few actors register menace on screen as persuasively as Mr. Winstone, who here directs that menace inward, turning Stanley into one more victim of the land's unrelenting violence.

And unrelenting it surely is. "The Proposition" probably comes closer to the truth than origin stories like "The Patriot," a Hollywood fantasy that turns the American Revolution into a glib action flick. Like some other storytellers intent on setting the record straight or at least a bit less crooked, Mr. Cave and Mr. Hillcoat occasionally and temporarily lose their way by letting the technological excesses of the present swamp the grim excesses of the past.

It is, for instance, hard to say what precisely we are to glean from the image of a man having his head shot to pieces, other than the skill of the special-effects artists and the realization that, in their own grubbily picturesque way, the filmmakers are as beholden to a kind of romance as anyone.

"The Proposition" is rated R (Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian). There is extreme gun and knife violence.

And this one:

NY Daily News

It's brother vs. brother in the Old Outback 
 
Guy Pearce plays an outlaw given an awful ultimatum in 'The Proposition.' 

The Proposition. Australian Western about a lawman's ­effort to rein in an outlaw band and bring civilization to the 19th-century Outback. With Ray Winstone, Guy Pearce, Emily Watson, Danny Huston. Directed by John Hillcoat (1:44). R: Violence, language. AMC Empire, Angelika.
Like the spaghetti Westerns of Sergio Leone, Australian director John Hillcoat's bloody - and bloody good - "The Proposition" is a traditional Hollywood movie shot on another frontier.

Unlike the Leone films, whose Spanish locations stood in for the American West, "The Proposition" was shot where the story is set, in the rugged, fly-infested outback of Queensland where, in the 1880s, the last of the immigrant outlaws known as bushrangers were being rounded up and hanged.

Behind the opening credits of "The Proposition," we see photographs of a murdered family in funereal repose, the bullet holes that killed them still visible on their faces. One of the dead, we'll come to learn, was the pregnant friend of the wife of Morris Stanley (Ray Winstone), a lawman brought from England to tame the area.

The movie then opens with a shootout between Stanley's posse and members of the Irish Burns Gang, two of whom - brothers Charlie (Guy Pearce) and Mike (Richard Wilson) - are captured. But, instead of bringing them in for public hangings, Stanley has an offer: if Charlie will find his notorious older brother Arthur and kill him, Stanley will set the younger brothers free.

The film then splits into parallel story lines: one stays behind with Stanley, who's trying to keep his wife Martha (Emily Watson) safe while he deals with the anger of the man who hired him; the other follows Charlie's search for Arthur (Danny Huston), who's holed up in the mountains.

Despite all the violence that ensues, "The Proposition" is a psychological Western more in the mold of Clint Eastwood's "Unforgiven" than the John Ford films its stark cinematography resembles. It's about a good man, Stanley, who does bad things, and a bad man, Charlie, fighting his conscience.

With the exception of Huston, a good actor miscast as a menacing psychopath with a literary bent, the cast is perfect.

Pearce, playing a variation on Eastwood's quietly lethal Man With No Name, is a wiry figure wound extremely tight, and without saying much, he projects the emotional tug of war in a man having to kill one brother to save another.

As Morris Stanley, a decent man who regrets having placed his wife in jeopardy but remains determined to finish his job ("High Noon" anyone?), Winstone provides the ultimate conscience of the film.

But, John Hurt, in a cameo as a reptilian bounty hunter, deserves an award for exceeding the call. In his character's death scene, Hurt reads his lines with a fly crawling over his eye. A lesser actor - or a critic - would have yelled "Cut!"

Originally published on May 5, 2006
 
 
 



« Last Edit: May 09, 2006, 09:40:18 AM by cigar joe » Logged

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« Reply #41 on: May 09, 2006, 09:22:52 AM »

Family Ties and Australian History, Both Soaked in Blood, in 'The Proposition'
Sign In to E-Mail This Print Save
 
By MANOHLA DARGIS
Published: May 5, 2006
The teeth are yellow in the Australian western "The Proposition," and the sky is as red as blood. Directed by John Hillcoat from a screenplay by the darkly moody musician and author Nick Cave, the film tells a story of murder in the outback that is as cruel as it is aesthetically flamboyant. Here flies swarm over the living and the dead with equal attention, perhaps because one doesn't really seem all that different from the other. In the late 19th century, warm flesh and cold meat each appear fairly rancid under the glare of the hot Australian sun, or at least when caught in the similarly pitiless gaze of these filmmakers.

Skip to next paragraph
Enlarge This Image
 
Kerry Brown/First Look Pictures
Guy Pearce portrays Charlie Burns, an outlaw in the Australian outback, in the dark western "The Proposition," written by Nick Cave.

Readers’ Opinions
Forum: Movies
The wide open spaces and roughneck history of modern Australia, including the wholesale slaughter of the continent's native peoples, make the country a natural setting for a western. Not surprisingly, given Mr. Cave's fondness for the baroquely macabre (one of his recent CD's is titled "Abattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus"), "The Proposition" takes a jaundiced view of the frontier. That's particularly true of the white settlers, who in both their tooth decay and moral rot come across as more desperate than even Sam Peckinpah's most colorful desperadoes, and who appear fairly indistinguishable no matter on what side of the law they travel. Mr. Cave left Australia years ago, but his native country's penal-colony origins and mysterious beauty have clearly retained a strong grip on his imagination.

Given that "The Proposition" tells something of a national-foundation story, there's a primal, almost biblical tint to its parts. Guy Pearce plays Charlie Burns, who, after riding in an outlaw gang alongside his older brother, Arthur (Danny Huston), is imprisoned by the reform-minded Captain Stanley (a magnificent Ray Winstone). The captain cuts Charlie loose after presenting him with the proposal of the film's title: either Charlie kills Arthur by Christmas, which is fast approaching, or Stanley will hang their teenage brother, a simpleton called Mikey (Richard Wilson). Fortified by alcohol, Charlie rides into the outback, looking for his older brother, a butcher of men whom the Aborigines liken to a dog; fortified by love for his wife, Martha (Emily Watson), the captain uneasily remains behind.

As this lineup suggests, the cast of "The Proposition" is reason enough to see the film. Mr. Huston has carved out his own screen niche as a creepy-crawler, and while his character is at once underconceived and overbaked, given to spouting verse like the poetic creation he is, the actor makes him a wonderfully substantial presence, whether galloping across a plain or sitting Buddha-like in front of the sinking sun. There is something heavy and monumental about the way Mr. Huston takes up film space (in this he can recall his father, John Huston), which makes a nice counterpart to the otherworldly Mr. Pearce, a performer of such apparent delicate physicality and eerie grace that you half expect him to be carried off by the wind.

Both actors are memorable, as is Mr. Winstone, whose surprising, occasionally eccentric performance provides "The Proposition" with some of its finest moments. Sweat pouring off his thick body, matting his hair and spotting his uniform, Captain Stanley seems like a man perpetually out of his element, whether he's squirming under his wife's touch or trying to bring his brutish men to heel.

Boiling over with rage and choked by despair, he appears trapped in existential impotence, yet wages war at everything and everyone around him: his men, the town, the outlaws, his wife, even his own body. Few actors register menace on screen as persuasively as Mr. Winstone, who here directs that menace inward, turning Stanley into one more victim of the land's unrelenting violence.

And unrelenting it surely is. "The Proposition" probably comes closer to the truth than origin stories like "The Patriot," a Hollywood fantasy that turns the American Revolution into a glib action flick. Like some other storytellers intent on setting the record straight or at least a bit less crooked, Mr. Cave and Mr. Hillcoat occasionally and temporarily lose their way by letting the technological excesses of the present swamp the grim excesses of the past.

It is, for instance, hard to say what precisely we are to glean from the image of a man having his head shot to pieces, other than the skill of the special-effects artists and the realization that, in their own grubbily picturesque way, the filmmakers are as beholden to a kind of romance as anyone.

"The Proposition" is rated R (Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian). There is extreme gun and knife violence.

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« Reply #42 on: May 09, 2006, 01:51:37 PM »


Like the spaghetti Westerns of Sergio Leone, Australian director John Hillcoat's bloody - and bloody good -


 
 
 






here is a common mis-conception. Since when are leone's westerns bloody? "Bloody Good" yes, but "Bloody", as in "Blood and guts", no they are not.



*Note*: when is this getting a U.S. release? Is it even going to come here at all?

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« Reply #43 on: May 09, 2006, 05:02:49 PM »

Its in theaters in NYC

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« Reply #44 on: May 09, 2006, 05:04:21 PM »

Its in theaters in NYC

thanks Joe.

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