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Author Topic: Looking for cd of original soundtrack of the first two Dollars films  (Read 3036 times)
drinkanddestroy
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« on: August 04, 2010, 08:22:05 PM »

know where i can get it?

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« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2010, 11:24:29 PM »

Search for a CD you like best (original or compilation): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ennio_Morricone_discography

And once you find one best suited for you you can find it pretty easily on the net.

On Amazon, for example: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dpopular&field-keywords=ennio+morricone&x=0&y=0&ih=13_2_0_0_0_0_0_0_0_1.79_208&fsc=2

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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2010, 08:30:43 AM »

Fistful is easy; maybe the best for For a Few Dollars More is Legendary Italian Westerns Volume 2 which has bost, and pretty complete FDM.
http://www.amazon.com/Legendary-Italian-Westerns-Ennio-Morricone/dp/samples/B000002WE1/ref=dp_tracks_all_1#disc_1

That one is RCA/BMG #9974-2-R

There also is For a Few Dollars More/A Fistful of Dollars RCA #ND 70391 and the For a Few Dollars More Expanded edition (Per Qualche Dollaro in Piu) GDM #2038.  

I have all three.  I believe the last one listed is the one that has the full version of the final Indio-Mortimer gunfight, with the chimes almost stopping, and Eastwood arrives with the second pocket watch.

« Last Edit: February 25, 2011, 06:12:45 AM by Cusser » Logged
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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2011, 05:01:48 AM »

ok, i was finally able to find the full soundtrack cd for FOD. I also got the "Legendary Italian Westerns" vol. II, which has 8 songs from FAFDM; do you know if the FAFDM soundtrack album has more than those 8?

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« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2011, 11:40:12 AM »

Comments from on-line reviews of GDM 2038 (from 2003):

Per Qualche Dollaro in Piu: The Complete Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (GDM 2038, 2003)


To be clear, the album I'm talking about here is the 2003 Expanded Edition of the score (GDM 2038). When it first arrived, I was very disappointed. I was expecting a proper full edition of the main score. You don't get that here. However, having listened to it again recently, it's actually not as bad as I first thought.
It contains 22 tracks, as the previous reply says. The contents of the entire original album is included, in stereo. In addition, there are 7 mono tracks that are proper recordings. These qualify as worthwhile additions to the original album. The main weakness is the fact that there are also 5 tracks which have been copied directly from actual film sound (probably from a DVD). These are just plain awful...the sound is poor and whatver music you hear is spoiled by the effects track. The worst of the lot is the inclusion of the sequence where Indio escapes from prison.
The only exception is track 1 which is the film sound version of the main theme and, because the sound quality is OK, seems more acceptable.
Finally, you get both the English and the Italian version of the vocal (An Eye For An Eye) which are both good. The English one appears on many collections but the Italian version is rarer.
An annoying mistake on the CD is the misnaming of the "Carillon" theme. (The old album version of "Carillon" is, in fact, track 19 and the one that has been labelled "Carillon" on this CD's track list, is one of the new mono tracks.)
Is it worth buying? If you like the score, I would say it is. But it is not definitive. The hard truth is that parts of the original soundtrack no longer exist or have been lost. They've done the best they can I suppose but, in my opinion, they should have left out the film-sound sequences.
I hope this is of some help.

Also returning with Leone was composer Ennio Morricone who was again closely involved with the making of the film. And just as Leone upped his antes for this film, so did Morricone step up the score to an even more grandiose level, developing several of the ideas he had come up with in Fistful to provide a more confident musical language in this follow-up film. As was usual with Leone, he considered sound to provide almost half the content of a movie and For a Few Dollars More shows his first attempts at making the music itself part of the narrative, instead of remaining just a detached accompaniment sounding from the heavens. This manifests itself from the very beginning as an unseen man shoots another person riding a horse further off in the valley while whistling and humming a small tune to himself. Despite not really being a part of the score proper, the music and sounds are often interlinked together to provide accents or to compliment each other as in the following main title sequence where the music is constantly punched through with gunshots as it was in the previous film as well. The title music itself is not really much different to the opening music from A Fistful of Dollars, the overall structure remaining pretty much identical while the details are elaborated and made larger. Also, as it was the case in the previous film and will be again in the following film, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, the main titles introduce the two signature instruments for the two main characters, the jaw harp for Colonel Mortimer and the flute trill for Monco. Otherwise all the familiar elements are there from the grunting male choir of I Cantori Moderni (this time sounding almost incomprehensible), the whistling and electric guitar of Alessandro Alessandroni, and the galloping drum rhythms.

But the greater new innovation for the Leone western was to truly insert the music for the narrative as something that helped drive the actual plot forward. This took the form of the chiming pocket watch that Indio used as a count down in his duels, the haunting melody of which goes through the film like a spectre of something hidden in the subtext, underneath the actual on-screen action. This music first appears in a veiled form when Indio is springed from jail and makes it’s first real mark in the cue “Chapel Shootout” where Indio exacts revenge on the man who sent him to jail originally. The music actually gets quite a lot of varied exposure in the film even outside the actual chiming of the watch as in the aforementioned Chapel shootout sequence where a monstrously powerful church organ suddenly rumbles out to add the sense of religious ritualism to the scene (interspersed with Indio’s signature with a strumming guitar), or during the conversation Indio and Mortimer have in El Paso, the music slyly hinting at a greater connection with the two men, and finally during the final duel between Indio and Mortimer (“La Resa dei Conti”), where the music is given to the trumpet, to perform it as a traditional Mexican funeral dirge with the familiar mariachi rhythms, another idea taken straight from the previous film’s musical language. In the cue “Addio Colonello” the theme is given its final outing as a sort of traditional and nostalgic send off to the old honor bound gunslinger of the Colonel where the chimes mingle with soaring strings and a full adult choir for a magnificent two minutes of music. On a slightly different note the score is also considerably more suspenseful than outright actiony. Cues like “Osservatori Osservati,” “Discovered” and “Il Colpo” provide quite a lot of suspenseful and atonal writing that again is not the most exciting in the world, while a notable exception comes in the cue “Il Vizio di Uccidere” that is operatically soaring and adds the vocal talents of soprano Edda dell’Orso for the first time in a Morricone score for a fantastic one shot for a sweeping sense of epic scale.

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« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2011, 10:26:04 AM »

know where i can get it?
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fistful-Sounds-Complete-Soundtracks/dp/B00000JAVF

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