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: Why didn't Tuco kill Blondie?  ( 11561 )
Eswar
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« : September 18, 2011, 07:22:01 AM »

Hello friends, am new to the forum. Don't know if the question has already been posed, but this is it: After Tuco and Blondie barter their half of the secret, why didn't Tuco kill Blondie afterwards? Going by his goofy nature, he would have believed Blondie must've told him the truth and killed him. There were two main opportunities - while crossing the river and while Blondie was tending to the dying Confederate soldier. This has always perplexed me. ???

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« #1 : September 18, 2011, 03:04:19 PM »

while Blondie was tending to the dying Confederate soldier.

Hence the (deleted) canon duel. So he did try to kill him.



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« #2 : September 18, 2011, 03:25:54 PM »


Hence the (deleted) canon duel. So he did try to kill him.

In one version  O0


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Eswar
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« #3 : September 19, 2011, 04:02:13 AM »

But the canon duel was initiated by Blondie, evident as his canon shot dehorses Tuco. I guess Tuco then fires the shots in retaliation. If Tuco had to kill him, he could have used his gun (which he is adept at handling) rather than resort to heavy ammunition. Moreover, you can see Tuco's emotions when Blondie spotted the soldier - clandestinely skedaddling from the scene to find the fortune by himself - his intent seemingly innocuous.

Probably if he did use his gun, he would have known it's empty - which would mean we wouldn't have the famous truel.  ::)

« : September 19, 2011, 04:10:08 AM Eswar »
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« #4 : September 19, 2011, 04:25:31 AM »

But the canon duel was initiated by Blondie, evident as his canon shot dehorses Tuco. I guess Tuco then fires the shots in retaliation. If Tuco had to kill him, he could have used his gun (which he is adept at handling) rather than resort to heavy ammunition. Moreover, you can see Tuco's emotions when Blondie spotted the soldier - clandestinely skedaddling from the scene to find the fortune by himself - his intent seemingly innocuous.

Probably if he did use his gun, he would have known it's empty - which would mean we wouldn't have the famous truel.  ::)

True, I get the impression that Tuco has a very infinitesimally small character arc over the course of the film and at the end he would rather just screw Blondie over rather than kill him.


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Eswar
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« #5 : September 19, 2011, 05:15:20 AM »

Over the course of the film, Tuco's character comes across as someone who is as oafish as dangerous he can be. He had two instances previously to kill Blondie - hanging in the hotel and shooting in the desert - both interrupted miraculously. If he had no qualms of killing Blondie just for revenge, his avarice can as well lead him to go on to kill him (while tending to the soldier) which would make him have the entire booty.

Blondie wanted to teach him a lesson by deliberately firing the canon shot near him, but not at him. This might have led Tuco believe Blondie was going to kill him and therefore retaliate. But it seems equally incredulous that after the (deleted) canon fire exchange, he (forgets all this? and) simply throws away the map and goes on to search for Stanton's grave - despite having a belligerent Blondie after him.

I'm sorry if this is too trivial a discussion, but don't shoot me down for this!

« : September 19, 2011, 07:56:37 PM Eswar »
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« #6 : September 19, 2011, 08:08:52 AM »

Where I see the manifest of change most is after the meeting in the mission with he brother, and subsequently the ride on the ambulance with Blondie.


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« #7 : September 19, 2011, 09:30:28 AM »

That might be the impetus for the change, but the change (if there is one) doesn't really seem to manifest itself fully until the Walk of Death in Ft. Smith (what you've identified as Ft. Smith). At that point, the pair are working as a team, covering each other from enemy fire. The old Tuco would have let Blondie take one for the team without a moment's hesitation.



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« #8 : September 19, 2011, 11:39:06 AM »

This is a topic that can be debated for all time. Does Tuco change in the story? Certainly our perception of him changes as we find out new things about him (e.g. his encounter with Father Ramirez), but that's not the same thing as having his character change. It seems certain that Blondie changes viz a viz Tuco as the story goes along--at one point he's willing to leave him alone in the desert to die, at the end he does an even split with the guy and lets him live. Of course, Blondie has also heard the conversation with Fra Ramirez . . .

But Tuco's true feelings remain a mystery. He's just crafty enough to fake change if he thinks it's to his advantage. How can we trust the appearance of change in such a charlatan?



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« #9 : September 19, 2011, 01:07:57 PM »

...or probably because Sentenza - Angel Eyes was still around and Tuco preferred to have Blondie on his side as previously in Aberdeen City

« : September 20, 2011, 11:11:51 AM pippo »

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« #10 : September 20, 2011, 02:50:46 PM »

This is a topic that can be debated for all time. Does Tuco change in the story? Certainly our perception of him changes as we find out new things about him (e.g. his encounter with Father Ramirez), but that's not the same thing as having his character change. It seems certain that Blondie changes viz a viz Tuco as the story goes along--at one point he's willing to leave him alone in the desert to die, at the end he does an even split with the guy and lets him live. Of course, Blondie has also heard the conversation with Fra Ramirez . . .

But Tuco's true feelings remain a mystery. He's just crafty enough to fake change if he thinks it's to his advantage. How can we trust the appearance of change in such a charlatan?

Very interesting thread to read and think about here...once Tuco has his revenge with Blondie in the desert I think it becomes more of a question of how he can CHEAT Blondie, as opposed to how he can KILL Blondie. Certainly when it came down to a gun battle for the gold it was winner take all....but I don't think even if his gun was loaded he would try to kill Blondie, maybe just wing him enough (Tuco is pretty skilled with a gun) to take Blondie's gun away and steal the gold from him.

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« #11 : September 21, 2011, 06:00:13 AM »

Just a passing thought, why did Blondie initiate the canon duel in the first place? Is it because he knows that the cemetery was on the other side, but difficult to find out without a horse (which Tuco rode away)? Or just to teach him a lesson? In either case, Blondie would leave the greedy Tuco the asinine task of finding the treasure for him.

« : September 21, 2011, 06:46:20 AM Eswar »
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« #12 : September 21, 2011, 09:10:12 AM »

It seems like Tuco is trying to run off and leave Blondie behind. Blondie thinks this is uncivil and so decides to slow him down a bit. I don't think he knows how close to the cemetary they are. Tuco's fall into the next scene is both a happy accident and an event pre-ordained by the film's demiurge, Sergio.



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« #13 : September 21, 2011, 02:09:39 PM »

demiurge, nice word dj  O0 O0 O0, we can always count on you  8)


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« #14 : September 22, 2011, 09:24:01 PM »

I just watched the 3-way shootout at Sadhill again. Tuco was emptying his gun at AE/Sentenza. Perhaps Blondie noticed this and therefore split the loot with him?


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