Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
May 22, 2024, 04:20:31 PM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  General Information
| |-+  General Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  List of Top 20 Comedy Westerns
0 and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 [2]
: List of Top 20 Comedy Westerns  ( 10898 )
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3592



« #15 : November 28, 2011, 02:09:04 PM »

There is at least an excellent DVD from Koch Media (albeit region 2) of Baquero


Richard--W
Bandido
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


west of Hell's fringe


« #16 : November 28, 2011, 02:19:43 PM »

I've just about had it with region 2's. They speed up the pitch 4% so that men sound like women and the motion so that everybody arrive before they left. You should hear James Coburn and Charles Bronson in the U.K. edition of Hard Times (1974) (it's widescreen and anamorphic). Their voices are too high and they speak to fast. "What did you say your name was?" comes out as "Whatdidyousayyournamewas?"

Yet I have about 200 region 2's. No more unless it's something special.


Richard


"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #17 : November 28, 2011, 02:48:35 PM »

Lee Van Cleef played nicely against type in "El Condor" doing a believable a saddle tramp.  I'm sure you have seen it, the film isn't too bad either, sort of grows on you.

Van Cleef was sadly wasted by the US Film industry, like I mentioned and Richard Boone in my opinion also. I'd put them both with Tucker & Connors.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Cusser
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2163


Remember, I always see the job through !


« #18 : November 28, 2011, 08:26:43 PM »

I can't seem to connect with the Sabata films. I've tried. They're not telling a story that makes any kind of sense to me. But they have Van Cleef.

Richard

Sabata is OK.  Adios Sabata with Brynner was titled Indio Black, then re-titled to cash in on the popularity of Sabata.  Both were directed by Gianfranco Parolini (Frank Kramer).  Return of Sabata: I recommend to miss that.

Agree: Leone brought out Van Cleef's best two performances, by far.  Maybe because he acted out the scenes for everyone.

Richard--W
Bandido
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


west of Hell's fringe


« #19 : November 28, 2011, 08:52:35 PM »

My memory of El Condor is so vague, I need to catch up with it again.  It is directed by John Guillermin, a Brit whose work I think highly of, and it is written by Larry Cohen, the creator of The Invaders TV series, and whose indy films are favorites of mine.

I agree with you about Richard Boone.

Van Cleef didn't always get the best material there in Europe, but at least he got the lead, and he always made the proceedings interesting even when the film was a dud.


Richard

« : November 28, 2011, 08:54:00 PM Richard--W »

"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
Richard--W
Bandido
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


west of Hell's fringe


« #20 : November 28, 2011, 08:57:58 PM »

Sabata is OK.  Adios Sabata with Brynner was titled Indio Black, then re-titled to cash in on the popularity of Sabata.  Both were directed by Gianfranco Parolini (Frank Kramer).  Return of Sabata: I recommend to miss that.

Agree: Leone brought out Van Cleef's best two performances, by far.  Maybe because he acted out the scenes for everyone.

Well, Sabata is not okay with me, but like I said, it does have Van Cleef in fine form.

I missed Sergio Leone in the 1970s. Duck You Sucker was wonderful but it wasn't enough. I wanted more westerns from him. I think the whole world wanted more westerns from him. Imagine if he had found more stories to do with Van Cleef. Now that really would have been something.


Richard


"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #21 : November 29, 2011, 03:30:29 AM »

Well, Sabata is not okay with me, but like I said, it does have Van Cleef in fine form.

I missed Sergio Leone in the 1970s. Duck You Sucker was wonderful but it wasn't enough. I wanted more westerns from him. I think the whole world wanted more westerns from him. Imagine if he had found more stories to do with Van Cleef. Now that really would have been something.


Richard

This has never made sense to me, you would have thought Hollywood would have caught on to the potential of Leone and offered him some kind of multi picture deal to make Westerns. Especially with the comparative staleness of the US product. Its like they couldn't see the tree because of the forest, or didn't want to.

Just imagine if he could have tapped the potential of doing part his films in the US & Mexico (with the vast stable of character actors and the classic locations) along with what he did in Spain & Europe, and have the operatic style too, something like Once Upon a Time In The West using Monument Valley but on a bigger scale.



"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #22 : November 29, 2011, 03:35:44 AM »

Sabata is OK.  Adios Sabata with Brynner was titled Indio Black, then re-titled to cash in on the popularity of Sabata.  Both were directed by Gianfranco Parolini (Frank Kramer).  Return of Sabata: I recommend to miss that.

Agree: Leone brought out Van Cleef's best two performances, by far.  Maybe because he acted out the scenes for everyone.

I remember as a kid going to a Times Square theater to see Sabata expecting LVC to be something like Mortimer, because THAT is the way it was promoted. What they should have done was promote it as if it was an Italian version of The Wild Wild West, because that is how it came off sort of spoof-ish and outlandish, then going in you would have known what to expect.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11454


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #23 : November 29, 2011, 04:25:58 AM »

This has never made sense to me, you would have thought Hollywood would have caught on to the potential of Leone and offered him some kind of multi picture deal to make Westerns. Especially with the comparative staleness of the US product. Its like they couldn't see the tree because of the forest, or didn't want to.

Just imagine if he could have tapped the potential of doing part his films in the US & Mexico (with the vast stable of character actors and the classic locations) along with what he did in Spain & Europe, and have the operatic style too, something like Once Upon a Time In The West using Monument Valley but on a bigger scale.

It wasn't an issue of Leone not being offered work in the '70s. He was tired of making Westerns, wanted to produce his own films, and indeed made quite a few during that time period. To name just a few, the Nobody films were big hits in Europe and he made several successful comedies with Carlo Verdone. Not to mention he spent the whole decade trying to get Once Upon a Time in America off the ground.

I'd add that given that he was offered a chance to direct The Godfather I doubt it's an issue of Hollywood ignoring him either. Seems to me the "blame" (such as it existed) for lack of Leone Westerns falls with Leone himself.

« : November 29, 2011, 04:52:09 AM Groggy »


Saturday nights with Groggy
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #24 : November 29, 2011, 05:34:49 AM »

Quote
I'd add that given that he was offered a chance to direct The Godfather I doubt it's an issue of Hollywood ignoring him either. Seems to me the "blame" (such as it existed) for lack of Leone Westerns falls with Leone himself.

That is true also, but he may have been disgusted at the way Hollywood re-edited OUTITW, and was wary of that aspect of the business, and I think it was possibly because of Leone's dislike of the flood of SW's that hit the market after his success that may have soured him on Westerns.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Richard--W
Bandido
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


west of Hell's fringe


« #25 : November 29, 2011, 11:05:52 AM »

I didn't know Sergio Leone had soured on the genre because of the trend he started, or helped start, but then trivia is not my thing. I assumed he had a higher opinion of spaghetti westerns. Certainly his own films tower over the rest of them, judging by the fifty or sixty I've seen so far.  I can't say I think much of the comedies he produced, but then comedy like trivia is not my thing.

Perhaps some fresh ideas, reading western fiction, or stories coming out of the historical west would have revived his interest, who knows.

Richard


"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #26 : November 29, 2011, 11:20:44 AM »

I didn't know Sergio Leone had soured on the genre because of the trend he started, or helped start, but then trivia is not my thing. I assumed he had a higher opinion of spaghetti westerns. Certainly his own films tower over the rest of them, judging by the fifty or sixty I've seen so far.  I can't say I think much of the comedies he produced, but then comedy like trivia is not my thing.

Perhaps some fresh ideas, reading western fiction, or stories coming out of the historical west would have revived his interest, who knows.

Richard

That was the nature of the Italian Film industry one trend after another, sword and sandal (peplums) success flooded the theaters when that trend ended SWs boomed, I read that roughly 600+ were made between 1965 and the early 70's. I've heard quotes from Leone about how ridiculous/outrageous the copycats were getting in plots and story lines (for a minor example think Sabata).


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11454


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #27 : November 29, 2011, 04:32:30 PM »

I'd add to CJ's post that Leone was very critical of the genre's slide towards politically-themed and comedy Westerns. He was very derisive towards The Big Gundown and They Call Me Trinity in particular, and one could see DYS and Nobody as a critique of that sort of Spaghetti.

Then again, it's also possible Leone didn't want to pigeonholed as a Western director either.



Saturday nights with Groggy
: 1 [2]  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.066145