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: what movies did leone admire?  ( 6618 )
mr. mouse
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« : July 08, 2008, 03:31:56 PM »

The reason I drop this question is because I'm always so interested in what inspired my filmmaking idols.
So far I know Sergio Leone was a massive fan of Gone With the Wind, I've read it was his dream to remake it.
Does anybody know of any other movies or film directors Sergio was nuts about?


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« #1 : July 08, 2008, 03:38:30 PM »

This topic's come up a good many times before.

In terms of directors, I know he liked the general works of:

- John Ford (his movies are basically the "anti-Ford")
- Charlie Chaplin (cited Monsieur Verdoux as his favorite film on several occasions, and that film served as a major inspiration for GBU - allegedly, at least)
- Buster Keaton
- Akira Kurosawa (or else why would he have "borrowed" the plot of Yojimbo for FOD?)
- David Lean (or at least copied style points from him; but GBU at least has a direct reference to Great Expectations)
- Howard Hawks (Rio Bravo in particular it would seem)

Individiual films he liked, although I'm not sure of his opinions of the directors' works in general, include:

- High Noon
- Warlock
- Vera Cruz (quite obviously the inspiration for Leone's cynical take on gunslingers as double-crossing cut-throat mercenaries)
- Shane
- 3:10 to Yuma (Jenkins has done a good job showing how Leone drew inspiration from this flm)
- Gone With the Wind (as you've mentioned; it seemed to be one of his favorites as he referred to it on many, many occasions in interviews, etc.)
- Public Enemy (the gun-shop scene in GBU came from this film, I believe)



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« #2 : July 08, 2008, 11:50:04 PM »

Thanks, that was exactly the kind of information I was lookin' for  :)


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« #3 : July 10, 2008, 03:58:44 PM »

has anyone here seen Warlock? I was listening to the commentary on fistful recently and frayling mentioned it a couple of times, I'm very interested in seeing that movie.


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« #4 : July 10, 2008, 04:05:18 PM »

I don't particularly care for Warlock, it's a bit too oddball for me. Basically it's the Wyatt Earp story retold as a Freudian psychodrama, with an implied homosexual relationship between Henry Fonda and Anthony Quinn. It definitely has a major influence on Leone, though.



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« #5 : July 10, 2008, 05:08:19 PM »

sounds like my kinda flick  O0
i tend to go for the oddball stuff.


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« #6 : July 10, 2008, 05:31:15 PM »

check out the thread "30 Westerns in Once"

http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=1379.0

« : July 10, 2008, 05:33:02 PM cigar joe »

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« #7 : November 26, 2011, 10:00:47 PM »

The reason I drop this question is because I'm always so interested in what inspired my filmmaking idols.
So far I know Sergio Leone was a massive fan of Gone With the Wind, I've read it was his dream to remake it.
Does anybody know of any other movies or film directors Sergio was nuts about?

I'm opposed to remakes of great achievements as a rule, but there is more to the novel than ended up in Gone With the Wind. A Sergio Leone version sounds too good to be true. If he were still with us, I'm for it. Hell yes!


I don't particularly care for Warlock, it's a bit too oddball for me. Basically it's the Wyatt Earp story retold as a Freudian psychodrama, with an implied homosexual relationship between Henry Fonda and Anthony Quinn. It definitely has a major influence on Leone, though.

This is why I hate responding to Groggy's posts. He's a know-it-all who doesn't know anything and keeps shooting his mouth off.

Warlock is based on a classic and epic western novel by Oakley Hall, first published in 1958.  I have a First Edition, First Printing hardcover with dust jacket inscribed to me by the author. It sits comfortably at the end of shelf number 4 in my Cochise County-Tombstone-Arizona bookcase #1. I had some discourse with Oakley Hall about his historical novels before he died. He read through Arizona and Kansas newspapers of the 1800s before he started writing, and drew heavily on manuscript collections at Historical Societies. He drew on cattle town histories in general, not just the Earp story. Research wasn't so easy in those days. At any rate, the film is faithful to the book, although streamlined. Perhaps too streamlined. There is no homosexual relationship in the novel and there is no homosexual relationship in the film. This interpretation caused director Edward Dmytryk considerable distress. While he was teaching at USC, I asked him about this. He was tired of people complimenting him for having the courage to depict a homosexual relationship in a western. He insisted Tom Morgan's motivation was about hero worship and the insecurity and dependency of being a cripple. He insisted that the writers and the actors and himself never thought of homosexuality as a motivation and never discussed it. But when he told homosexuals that, they would get offended, and sometimes tell him off, so he stopped discussing the film altogether. He said that audiences are free to identify and project their own ideas, but he didn't put it there.


Richard

« : November 27, 2011, 02:45:39 AM Richard--W »

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« #8 : November 27, 2011, 05:47:20 AM »



This is why I hate responding to Groggy's posts. He's a know-it-all who doesn't know anything and keeps shooting his mouth off.



Richard

No one is putting a gun to your head. If you don't want to respond to his posts, THEN DON'T! 

Mr. Mouse: check out Christopher Frayling's books on Leone. Those have lots of discussions about Leone's movie influences. The best book is the biography, called "Something to Do With Death." There's also a book called "Spaghetti Westerns" (written in early 80's, new edition in late 90's, I believe). And a big one called "Once Upon a Time in Italy" that is big and fancy color as part of an old museum exhibit, but which probably has little information the other 2 do not have. That one is great more for its great old posters  and lobby cards that it reprints. (though that book has a huge spread with every film reference  in Once Upon a Time in the West

« : November 27, 2011, 08:18:13 AM drinkanddestroy »

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« #9 : November 27, 2011, 08:11:25 AM »

This is why I hate responding to Groggy's posts. He's a know-it-all who doesn't know anything and keeps shooting his mouth off.

Wow, a three year old post upset you that much? You have a problem man.



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« #10 : January 23, 2012, 09:09:14 PM »

I just saw Warlock for the first time, and it wasn't my kinda film, I agree totally with Groggy's comments in this thread.

It's nuthin but a Freudian psychodrama. And if there really is no queer meaning behind it all, then what can I say, then Dmytryk musta been incredibly naive, cuz they did not do a very good job portraying the hero worship; it was simply -- in one way or another -- a partnership from the beginning. (eg. the Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford -- a movie i did not like at all -- at least portrayed the hero worship very clearly [and as an aside, in that one it's apparently supposed to be an overtly queer obsession on the part of Ford]).

But considering that male friendships  are a big theme in Leone films -- IN A VERY NON-SEXUAL WAY, FOR ALL YOU SICKOS OUT THERE  ;) -- I guess I can see why Leone would like this film, eh?

« : May 07, 2012, 05:39:25 PM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
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