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: Leone's League  ( 27278 )
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« #15 : September 30, 2004, 03:41:53 AM »

Well, so far an impresive list.  I'm not sure what criterior we are going by.

Bernado Bertoluci had some Leonesque epic landscapes in I think it was "Out Of Africa".

 Lina Wertmuller in "Seven Beauties" has Paqqualino Settebelzze in a loveable rougue character similar to Tuco.

So many movies so little time.


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« #16 : September 30, 2004, 04:54:56 AM »

 ???

Is anyone here a John Frankenheimer fan? He directed a number of acclaimed films such as SEVEN DAYS IN MAY, SECONDS, THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE and THE BIRDMAN OF ALCATRAZ, but I love him for his fabulous WWII action film THE TRAIN, and for the big racing film GRAND PRIX.

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« #17 : September 30, 2004, 07:26:17 AM »

Ingmar Bergman is another brilliant director, although I haven't seen enough of his work to decide how he compares to my other favourites.

Also Dario Argento, while not as diverse was pretty much the maestro in his own field.


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« #18 : September 30, 2004, 07:29:02 AM »

amazingly i've never seen a burtolucci film... although i am eager to.


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« #19 : September 30, 2004, 10:17:31 AM »

I've got some Fellini lined up next in my Netflix queue - and I suspect he exerted a STRONG influence upon Leone.  I've only seen snippets of his work in the past, but there's definitely a lot of the absurd/surrealistic that Leone borrowed.  Also the fascination with unusual, sculptural and less than beautiful faces (Al Muloch, Don Miguel Rojo, Baker, eg).  "La Dolce Vita" was just released on DVD this week.


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« #20 : October 04, 2004, 03:07:33 AM »

To me, the greatest director of all time is Akira Kurosawa. Films like Ikiru, Shichinin no samurai (aka Seven Samurai) and Rashomon are amongst the best ever made and my personal favorites. I'm also very fond of anime director Hayao Miyazaki, who very recently made masterpieces like Mononoke-Hime (aka Princess Mononoke) and Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi (aka Spirited Away). But of course I'm not saying he is much of an influential director, at least not outside of anime (which is, I might add, truly a fullfledged way of making films, not just for making kids stuff!). The same (when it comes to influence) might be said about Takeshi Kitano, another favorite of mine. His best work? Hana-Bi, Kidzu Ritan (aka Kids Return) & Kikijuro no natsu. Haven't seen his Dolls yet though.

Other favorites of mine include Stanley Kubrick, F.F. Coppola, of course Leone, Sidney Lumet and Zhang Yimou.

« : October 04, 2004, 03:09:15 AM David Aaronson »

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« #21 : October 05, 2004, 10:17:42 AM »

speaking of takeshi kitano... i've only seen "brother", but it was a great movie... if you can make it past the subtitles than i highly suggest it. not sure how popular it is, a friend of mine got me into kitano a while a ago.


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« #22 : October 05, 2004, 11:22:19 AM »

gotta agree with u David Aaronson.
For me its between Kurosawa and Fellini, with Leone and Welles maybe just behind.

Rashomon, Ikiru, Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, Sanshiro Sugata, Dersu Uzala, Kagemusha, Ran!
You name, if its done by Kurosawa its usually amazing.  ;D

The thing with Kurosawa is he crossed the language barrier because his films are not exclusively Japanese in theme, theyre still relevant worldwide.


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« #23 : October 05, 2004, 01:54:27 PM »

speaking of takeshi kitano... i've only seen "brother", but it was a great movie... if you can make it past the subtitles than i highly suggest it. not sure how popular it is, a friend of mine got me into kitano a while a ago.
I think it's the least of all his films, so, if you want to explore his work, you're in for a treat! I highly recommend Hana-Bi, it's an absolute masterpiece.

As for subtitles, I'm Dutch, and I'm used to subtitles to the point where I find it hard to follow a movie in my own language sometimes.., :P


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« #24 : October 05, 2004, 01:55:59 PM »

gotta agree with u David Aaronson.
For me its between Kurosawa and Fellini, with Leone and Welles maybe just behind.

Rashomon, Ikiru, Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, Sanshiro Sugata, Dersu Uzala, Kagemusha, Ran!
You name, if its done by Kurosawa its usually amazing.  ;D

The thing with Kurosawa is he crossed the language barrier because his films are not exclusively Japanese in theme, theyre still relevant worldwide.
Anything by Kurosawa is indeed good. However, I didn't like Ran as much as I expected I would... but I was influenced by lack of sleep and food at the time... :-\


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« #25 : October 06, 2004, 01:06:27 PM »

I don't watch Kurosawa time and again like I do Leone but having said that, the duels are fantastic.  The gory one at the end of Sanjuro nearly made me choke on my coffee when I first saw it, and the two guys fighting first with bamboo sticks then with swords in Seven Samurai is so atmospheric.  Beautifully shot.

All this talk of Japanese films though has reminded me of a film I taped off TV years ago but got lent out and was never seen again.  

It was B&W, very slow but very involving.  The title sounded something like Lapsong Suchong (but it wasn't) and involved a brother and sister being imprisoned at a very young age by a rival feudal lord who had conquered their fathers land.  By the by they escaped and the daughter (the son got killed I think) eventually found her mother but she'd gone mad (I do like a happy ending!).  Does anyone know the name of this film and any other details??


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« #26 : October 12, 2004, 03:56:38 PM »

Kurosawa, definitely.

What about Riddley Scott?

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« #27 : October 12, 2004, 10:05:45 PM »

Kubrick
Kurosawa
Hitchcock
Tarantino (in terms of entertainment value)
Takeshi Kitano
Bunuel
Polanski

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« #28 : October 16, 2004, 12:36:04 PM »

 I think the closest director to Leone is Sam Peckinpah as Cross of Iron is the logic extrapolation of what Leone did.  Except in this film the music is less noticeable, I personnaly think no director ever made a such good symbiose between film and soundtrack than Leone did.

 For the time being, I like what Ridley Scott does. He is one of the only European film maker to have reached the top of Hollywood box office. As an English an, he brings a certain European sensitivity that we aren't used to see at hollywood. See Gladiator: Ridley took the bet of reviving the peplum and suceeded. And when you watch Gladiator it isn't like an Hollywood movie(even if it is a superproduction), this film has something "out of time". And a great score too, like ine Leone films. It's definitely a film wich has something of Leone spirit.

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« #29 : October 23, 2004, 06:40:37 PM »

Hmmmm
Leone
Hitchcock
Kurosawa
Fritz Lang
Hawks
Ruben Mate
Wells
Chag Cheh
Tarantino
Besson
Rodriguez
The Coens
Guy Ritchie (though he needs to bounce back)
James Whale
Curtiz
Siegel
Budd Boetticher
Capra
Preston Sturges
John Sturges

Lots more but those are some of my favorites off the top of my head.

« : October 24, 2004, 08:13:02 PM Two Kinds of ... »

More feeling.
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