Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
May 16, 2021, 08:32:37 PM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Orson Welles
0 and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 ... 9 10 [11] 12 13 ... 23
: Orson Welles  ( 89190 )
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3374



« #150 : November 05, 2014, 01:46:11 PM »

Actually I don't trust imdb very much.


drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9560

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #151 : November 05, 2014, 04:27:41 PM »

Translated from Drinkish dumbass means he was just a nice guy ...

so my 9.5/10 means bad movie, my dumbass means nice guy; I don't know why I am paying a shrink; stanton has me all figured out  ;)


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13828


easy come easy go


« #152 : November 05, 2014, 06:56:00 PM »

Translated from Drinkish dumbass means he was just a nice guy ...

 ;D ;D ;D


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9560

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #153 : November 30, 2014, 12:11:16 PM »

so I've mentioned in the past that I never put Citizen Kane on top of my list of all-time greats. I've watched it many times, always trying to see why it's so great, and never could. I always hear about how innovative it was; maybe cuz I wasn't living in 1941 (Thank God for that) I don't realize how innovative it was.

So, I decided to rent the BRD from Netflix and watch the movie again, this time with Roger Ebert's commentary. Ebert loves this movie, says it's the greatest ever, I figured he would point out all that I was missing. To be sure, I'd definitely noticed some of the tricks they'd used – it's impossible not to – but I obviously wasn't aware of a lot of them.
I should point out that I'd only listened to one previous Ebert commentary – it was for Casablanca – and it is great. And now I listened to Ebert's commentary for CK, and it is great as well. After these two commentaries, I can say that Ebert is one of my favorite commentators ever, and I'll try to find more of his commentaries to listen to in the future.

He is really well-informed about so many of the tricks used in CK – he frequently credits Pauline Kael's work here; no DJ, Ebert is not a plagiarist. It is a wonderfully enjoyable experience watching the movie with Ebert's commentary. I'm not rushing to add this movie to #1 on my list, but I definitely have more of an appreciation for it now. Also, there was always something very memorable about it - even when I didn't have a great appreciation for it, somehow there were so many scenes and moments and lines that stuck in my head. And the two hours seem to fly by; there is never a boring moment in which I say, "just move on."

btw, I've mentioned in the past how much I love (everyone does) Bernstein's story about the girl in white taht he saw getting off the ferry. Ebert says that is his favorite moment in the movie! (Although Ebert interprets it differently than I do: as Ebert sees it, that story is saying, there is happiness out there for everyone if you seize it when it comes to you; maybe Bernstsin's life would have been different if he would have actually went over and asked that girl out. Me, I just thought that his line is about memory - as he says, you'd be surprised at what people remember. I didn't think it meant that he had missed any great opportunity at happiness; I just thought it was a comment about memory. Like, in his memory it was some great moment; if he'd actually talked to her she probably woulda laughed at him and this whole memory woulda been long forgotten!)

oh, one more thing: one criticism I have is how bad some of these matte paintings are. Like the one of the newsboy selling the papers in the early morning. and the ones of the people in the stands around Kane at the political rally. S badly and obviously fake. Some of the paintings are better, but the ones I mentioned and perhaps a few others are really bad.

When all is said and done, this movie ain't at the top of my list but somehow I watch it almost every time it is on TCM!


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3374



« #154 : November 30, 2014, 12:38:13 PM »

Now I wonder, what will happen if Ebert explains you how to understand Touch of Evil (an even better film than Citizen Kane)?


drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9560

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #155 : November 30, 2014, 04:58:16 PM »

Now I wonder, what will happen if Ebert explains you how to understand Touch of Evil (an even better film than Citizen Kane)?

Unlike Touch of Evil, I never hated Citizen Kane.


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9560

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #156 : December 08, 2014, 12:01:34 AM »

Film Forum will be having a major Welles retrospective from Jan. 1 thru Feb. 3, 2015. The retrospective will include three versions of Touch of Evil and two versions of Macbeth.

The series will be programmed by Bruce Goldstein, Film Forum's director of repertory programming; and Joseph McBride is a series consultant

All info here http://filmforum.org/series/orson-welles-series-page


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
PowerRR
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3326



« #157 : December 08, 2014, 08:30:18 PM »

Film Forum will be having a major Welles retrospective from Jan. 1 thru Feb. 3, 2015. The retrospective will include three versions of Touch of Evil and two versions of Macbeth.

The series will be programmed by Bruce Goldstein, Film Forum's director of repertory programming; and Joseph McBride is a series consultant

All info here http://filmforum.org/series/orson-welles-series-page
Is that the fullest version of Too Much Johnson to date at 90 minutes? I didn't even know that much existed. I've seen every Welles-directed film other than that, the remains of Don Quixote, and Other Side of the Wind.

drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9560

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #158 : December 14, 2014, 03:56:04 AM »

Magician: The Astonishing Life and Work of Orson Welles (2014) 10/10 dir. Chuck Workman. How great it was seeing clips of all of Welles work, unfinished projects also, on a big screen, included interviews.

I'll wait for the BRD of this documentary to be released. Before watching this documentary, I still have a few more Welles movies I gotta see. I haven't seen any of his Shakespeare movies yet.


here is a review of this documentary by Glenn Kenny at rogerebert.com

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/magician-the-astonishing-life-and-work-of-orson-welles-2014



Rating: 3 out of 4 stars

“You should always have something [to fall back on]. Me, I’ve got magic!” John Candy, doing a slightly pointed sendup of Orson Welles, made that joke in a great SCTV sketch in 1982. The real-life Welles regularly sawed Marlene Dietrich in half to entertain the troops during World War II, and played magicians—or illusionists—in films. His final completed feature, “F For Fake,” opens with him doing a little hand magic, before concocting a remarkable illusion in the form of an essay film for 90 minutes.

“The magician is an actor,” Welles himself is heard reflecting at the opening of this entertaining documentary directed by Chuck Workman, the master montage-maker whose work is a consistent highlight of the Academy Awards ceremonies every year. “Magician” is hardly a definitive account of the inordinately complex actor and creator that was Welles—at a mere 94 minutes, it could more accurately be deemed the tip of an iceberg—but it offers a not-bad education for folks who aren’t as familiar with the man and his work as they ought to be, and a few not insubstantial satisfactions for folks like myself, who agree with Jean-Luc Godard’s assessment of the man and his work: “All of us will always owe him everything.”

For one thing, Workman’s film tells a different story from that of showbiz conventional wisdom. That is that the always precocious Welles (“there’s nothing more hateful,” he chucklingly admits, than the kind of prodigy he was at the age of ten) was a wunderkind who peaked with his first commercial film (that’s 1941’s “Citizen Kane,” still a ripping yarn, poignant reflection, and galvanic primer of cinema language) and descended into a career purgatory of his own profligate making shortly thereafter. No, throughout its depiction of what it divides up as four phases of Welles’ life, Workman’s movie never stops depicting Welles as an artist: a restless, searching, often frustrated and sometimes frustrating artist, one who never stopped working but who worked in a fashion completely incomprehensible to the conventional wisdom of the cinema industry.

One interviewee points out that film is the only art form in which it’s considered eccentric, if not wasteful, to have left behind as large a body of unfinished work as Welles did. Of course the fact that there is so much unfinished work isn’t quite so bothersome as that it’s so hard to see, and the film seems almost weary in its final quarter as it has to make caveats concerning the unavailability of so much of Welles' work. Take “Falstaff,” a.k.a. “Chimes At Midnight.” This wonderful 1966 Shakespeare hybrid is confidently proclaimed by actor, director and Welles biographer Simon Callow as “finally, Welles’ masterpiece” (a piece of purposefully provocative quasi-heresy, given the likes of “Kane,” the compromised “The Magnificent Ambersons,” and the magnificent, and largely uncompromised, “The Trial”), but after the few minutes devoted to it the viewer is informed that it’s tied up in legal battles. There’s a sense here that Workman’s film, coming as it does a little prior to the centenary of Welles’ birth, and a possible construction and release of Welles’ last fully shot but largely unedited project “The Other Side of The Wind,” has something of an activist agenda: look at the works of this amazing film and theater director, scattered in disarray over the four corners of the globe, Workman seems to be saying. Can’t we do better?

Film lovers of every generation have to hope we can, and do. In the meantime, while this film elides a lot and makes a questionable choice or two in its portrayals of Welles’ outsize personality (I like Wolfgang Puck’s cooking as much as the next person who’s been to Spago, but I’m not sure his comments on Welles’ epicure side were entirely necessary here), it goes to most of the right people when it comes to shattering the myth of Welles the Hollywood flameout: critic/historians Jonathan Rosenbaum and Joseph McBride chime in with apt observations, and Welles’ longtime companion Oja Kodar is energetic and vibrant and even rather charmingly eccentric. Whatever its shortcomings, “Magician” accomplishes quite a bit as a corrective, and it also gives one an hour and a half in the company of Orson Welles. That in and of itself is worth at least a three-star rating.


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15339

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #159 : December 21, 2014, 07:50:23 PM »

From http://www.wellesnet.com/?p=11748

Quote
Criterion to release Orson Welles’ ‘Othello’ in 2015
December 19, 2014 


 ____

By RAY KELLY

Criterion Collection will release the restored version of Orson Welles' Othello on Blu-ray and DVD in fall 2015.

Full details on extras will be announced in the coming months, though initial plans call for inclusion of the 1955 U.S. edit prepared by Welles, according to Julian Schlossberg, who handled distribution of the Michael Dawson-produced restoration for the Estate of Orson Welles back in 1992.

Othello won the Palme d´Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1952.

Schlossberg told Wellesnet he was pleased that Othello would be a Criterion home video release. "The Criterion Collection is the most prestigious of all the DVD companies."

The late filmmaker's youngest daughter, Beatrice Welles, who oversees the estate, said she hoped the Criterion release would "bring Othello to audiences too young to appreciate our first restoration and for audiences who saw either the first release in the '50s and the first restoration in the '90s."

Criterion's catalog includes a DVD set of The Complete Mr. Arkadin and DVD and Blu-ray releases of F For Fake.

Othello has never been released on Blu-ray in the U.S. before. There was a DVD release from Image Entertainment in 1999 and an Academy Home Entertainment videocassette in 1993.

Carlotta Films US distributed a 2K digital restoration of Othello theatrically last spring.

Carlotta released Othello on Blu-ray in Europe last month. Among the extras on that home video release was Hilton Edwards' Return to Glennascaul with Welles in a cameo role.

Beginning production in 1949, Othello was shot over three years in numerous locations, sometimes in the same scene. Othello received great praise in Europe upon its release, but respect in America was less forthcoming. The film languished through the 1970s and 80s, largely due to a lack of distribution.

When Othello was refurbished in 1992 it was hailed as a cinematic landmark, despite questions in some quarters as to liberties taken by the restoration team, notably the decision to re-record the music score in stereo.



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
Dust Devil
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3662

Smoke Tuco, so you can't bullshit!


« #160 : January 10, 2015, 09:19:28 AM »

F for Fake (1973) - unrateable/10

Didn't like it much.


No matter how cleverly you sneak up on a mirror, the reflection always looks you straight in the eye.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9560

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #161 : January 10, 2015, 04:06:31 PM »

I liked F for Fake.
Btw, I remember reading on wikipedia, I believe, that much of the footage with Elmyr de Hory wasn't shot by Welles. I think someone else shot a lot of that footage and then Welles used it for his movie. I'd have to look it up sometime.


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Dust Devil
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3662

Smoke Tuco, so you can't bullshit!


« #162 : January 11, 2015, 01:28:30 AM »

It shows. O0


No matter how cleverly you sneak up on a mirror, the reflection always looks you straight in the eye.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9560

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #163 : January 11, 2015, 01:57:25 AM »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F_for_Fake#Plot

3rd paragraph
Irving's original part in F for Fake was as de Hory's biographer, but his part grew unexpectedly at some point during production. There has not always been agreement among commentators over just how that production unfolded, but the now-accepted story[fn] is that the director François Reichenbach shot a documentary about de Hory and Irving before giving his footage to Welles, who then shot additional footage with Reichenbach as his cinematographer.

footnote is to this link http://www.thewag.net/film/f_for_fake.html


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Dust Devil
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3662

Smoke Tuco, so you can't bullshit!


« #164 : January 11, 2015, 05:22:57 AM »

One man's trash...


No matter how cleverly you sneak up on a mirror, the reflection always looks you straight in the eye.
: 1 ... 9 10 [11] 12 13 ... 23  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.058149