Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
May 25, 2024, 10:41:43 AM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 and 5 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 ... 871 872 [873] 874 875 ... 1402
: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  ( 5068187 )
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9955

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #13080 : January 30, 2014, 09:23:23 PM »

Blue Valentine (2010) - 9/10


SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS
that was a good movie (I saw it a few months ago, I probably gave it like an 8/10), but I didn't like that  there's really no explanation given for why Michelle Williams turns on Ryan Gosling. Things seem to be going fine, then the dog dies and they go to the hotel for the nite – sure, there are some things different about them, like how he gets the crappy motel and doesn't wash the paint from his hands and doesn't have the same aspirations in life as she does – but it's like, there was basically never a bad word between them until that one argument in the motel about their aspirations in life, and all of a sudden - BOOM, I never wanna see you again. Huh?

Roger Ebert alludes to this in the final 3 paragraphs of his review - the full review is here http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/blue-valentine-2011 - I'll cut and paste the final 3 paragraphs here



"Blue Valentine" moves between past and present as if trying to remember what went wrong. From Dean's point of view, maybe nothing did. He wanted to be married to Cindy, and he still does and he still is. Cindy can't stand that. He never signed off on the grow old along with me part. He doesn't think the best is yet to be. He thinks it's just fine now.

Williams plays Cindy as a woman who has lost her pride of body and self. No, she doesn't become a drunk — he's the one who drinks too much. But that's not the problem. It's his infuriating inability to care for this Cindy, right here, right now, because when she married him, she became exactly the Cindy he required.

I wonder what kind of script conferences (writer and director Derek) Cianfrance had with his co-writers, Joey Curtis and Cami Delavigne. They were writing about something ineffable, a void, a need. This wasn't a story with convenient hooks involving things like, you know, disease — things stories are familiar with. It was about inner defeat and the exhaustion of hope. I've read reviews saying Cianfrance isn't clear about what went wrong as they got from there to here. Is anybody?



There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6654


Lonesome Billy


« #13081 : January 30, 2014, 11:33:11 PM »

Blue Valentine (2010) - 9/10


Really? Good. I think I'll end up giving it a shot...

If you liked the credits sequence: http://www.artofthetitle.com/title/blue-valentine/


moviesceleton
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3938


The glance that makes holes in the silver screen


« #13082 : January 31, 2014, 12:58:00 AM »

SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS
that was a good movie (I saw it a few months ago, I probably gave it like an 8/10), but I didn't like that  there's really no explanation given for why Michelle Williams turns on Ryan Gosling. Things seem to be going fine, then the dog dies and they go to the hotel for the nite – sure, there are some things different about them, like how he gets the crappy motel and doesn't wash the paint from his hands and doesn't have the same aspirations in life as she does – but it's like, there was basically never a bad word between them until that one argument in the motel about their aspirations in life, and all of a sudden - BOOM, I never wanna see you again. Huh?
I don't think things seem to be going totally fine even before the dog dies. There's a certain tension between them. Probably not more than is usual for a couple that has been married for six years, but clearly they're not madly in love anymore. That is clear to me from the first ten minutes. AND the fact that the dog dying becomes such a big deal tells me that they clearly are not alright. And the incident at the grocery store. And the fact that Dean thinks they need to get a motel room, get drunk and fuck all night, which they obviously haven't done in ages. So in my eyes their argument in the motel room is believable.

To me it seems that you don't approve of how the plot is presented (their problems seem to come out of nowhere). I don't see Ebert sharing your point of view here. How I read him, he isn't criticizing the film at all - he merely states how it is. And actually he brings up its greatest virtue. Instead of telling us what went wrong, the film asks us: "What went wrong?"


"Once Upon a Time in America gets ten-minute ovation at Cannes"
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3592



« #13083 : January 31, 2014, 02:51:32 AM »

I can't remember that I had any problems to understand what happens in Blue Valentine. This dog thing is only the occasion which makes a long grown tension visible. In real life an empty roll of toilet paper can be reason enough.


drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9955

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #13084 : January 31, 2014, 03:25:38 AM »

I don't think things seem to be going totally fine even before the dog dies. There's a certain tension between them. Probably not more than is usual for a couple that has been married for six years, but clearly they're not madly in love anymore. That is clear to me from the first ten minutes. AND the fact that the dog dying becomes such a big deal tells me that they clearly are not alright. And the incident at the grocery store. And the fact that Dean thinks they need to get a motel room, get drunk and fuck all night, which they obviously haven't done in ages. So in my eyes their argument in the motel room is believable.

To me it seems that you don't approve of how the plot is presented (their problems seem to come out of nowhere). I don't see Ebert sharing your point of view here. How I read him, he isn't criticizing the film at all - he merely states how it is. And actually he brings up its greatest virtue. Instead of telling us what went wrong, the film asks us: "What went wrong?"

Sorry for being unclear about Ebert – I was saying that Ebert alludes to the question, but that he isn't bothered by it, he doesn't think it's a problem.

 To me it was just so strange how she just says she is done with him, that came out of nowhere. I'm not saying that the fact that there is tension between them is not believable. I'm not saying the fact that they aren't as passionately in love as they once were is not believable. I'm just saying that to me, when she walks out on him (and it's FOR REAL, not just said in a brief moment of anger) that seems to come out of nowhere.

I guess the other viewpoint, which you and Ebert would subscribe to, is: By the time a relationship is doomed, you never really know how the problems started and what went wrong and why it went wrong and how it went wrong and what caused it to be over. All you know is, it IS over. By now, the how/why/when/what of (perhaps doesn't even matter, and in any case) can be very hard to remember; so that's the point of the flashbacks, to piece together what/when/how/why things started falling apart.

Here's something I never thought of till just now: When breakups happen, it's often over dumbass stuff or stuff you can't point to exactly or explain how/why, it's just something about the personalities don't work and one stops liking the other or whatever; it's not always something clear cut that someone can explain clearly like, "I broke up with him because of X." But in movies, I think there always IS a specific reason. (Often having something to do with infidelity, or maybe one spouse not spending enough time with the other, like in the case of showbiz people who who have to travel, etc.) So perhaps you can say that  Blue Valentine is being different, in that it's actually being more realistic, showing a breakup happening for reasons that aren't fully explained/understood, but more just a bunch of little, vague, subtle things put together that add up (along with perhaps many other unexplained/non-understood pieces) to the result that "This is over."

-------------------------------

I can't say I remember the movie scene for scene (( saw it at least six months ago, probably more), but as I recall, the flashback scenes show the couple meeting, being in love, etc.; the fighting only takes place in the current-day scenes, after they go to the motel... Where do you see in the flashback scenes that there is any tension? How is it clear to you from the first ten minutes that there is something wrong?

---------

RE: your comment about how the dog dying becomes such a big deal tell you "that they clearly are not alright" – (I never had any pets, but)  there are people who basically consider their pets to be part of their family; and they become disconsolate when their pet dies, shedding rivers of tears, being terribly sad for a long time.  Even more so considering that it wasn't an old/sick/dying dog, but a young healthy dog who was suddenly found dead.
and btw, in that scene where Gosling and Williams are crying after finding the dog (I don't remember if it's just before or just after they buried it)- there is no doubt that Gosling is really crying there. No phony glycerin tears; he is shedding streams of tears like a little baby. I'd like to know how he did that... you don't see him starting to cry; the scene begins as he is already in middle of crying, so he I bet he must have prepared somehow, maybe by reading really sad stories or watching sad videos (maybe of dog lovers telling stories about their dogs dying?) and got himself sad and started crying on camera, so the scene starts while he is in middle of crying...  :'(

« : January 31, 2014, 03:28:54 AM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
moviesceleton
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3938


The glance that makes holes in the silver screen


« #13085 : January 31, 2014, 04:20:10 PM »

I can't say I remember the movie scene for scene (( saw it at least six months ago, probably more), but as I recall, the flashback scenes show the couple meeting, being in love, etc.; the fighting only takes place in the current-day scenes, after they go to the motel... Where do you see in the flashback scenes that there is any tension? How is it clear to you from the first ten minutes that there is something wrong?
The flashbacks only show the good times. The first ten minutes take place in the present. It's basically just the couple doing ordinary stuff, but there are little glances and tones in their voices that imply something being a bit off.


"Once Upon a Time in America gets ten-minute ovation at Cannes"
PowerRR
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3373



« #13086 : February 01, 2014, 09:55:06 AM »

Bedazzled (1967)

3/10. Fuck that.

dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16798


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #13087 : February 01, 2014, 12:14:29 PM »

Bedazzled (1967)

3/10. Fuck that.
You fill me with inertia.



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16798


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #13088 : February 01, 2014, 02:52:33 PM »

The Baron of Arizona (1950) - 7/10. The almost true story of James Addison Reavis (Vincent Price), who, through an elaborate series of forgeries, attempted to bilk the U.S. out of the Territory of Arizona. As told by Samuel Fuller and James Wong Howe, this is a real corker until it goes all sappy at the end (the swindler is saved by the love of a good woman). Streaming free this week only on hulu: http://www.hulu.com/watch/484834

« : February 01, 2014, 02:54:17 PM dave jenkins »


"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11454


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #13089 : February 01, 2014, 07:24:48 PM »

Gentleman's Agreement - 7/10 - Anti-Semitism is bad. Good to know.

Now Voyager - 8/10 - A solid woman's picture.

Gravity - 8/10 - This might be the first time I've seen 3D actually add something to a movie. The first 40 minutes or so are amazing stuff; some of the best effects ever, immersive in a way most sci-fi movies can only dream of. After George Clooney's exit it turns into a predictable series of tasks format, but it's still entertaining.



Saturday nights with Groggy
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9955

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #13090 : February 01, 2014, 11:09:16 PM »

I Remember Mama (1948) 5/10

The stuff with the whining, screaming, bitching aunts and uncle is excruciating. The stuff with the immediate family is better – Irene Dunne is terrific, as is most of the cast – but even those family scenes are in some cases way too drawn out, or useless. Like the scene where Dunne is told she can't visit her kid in the hospital - first she goes to the doctor, she begs and begs him, then she goes to the nurse and begs and begs her, God, that could have been accomplished in 20 seconds, but it drags on endlessly. The scene where the aunt's husband tells her she's gonna have a waitress, God Almighty.... The last 15 minutes or so are pretty good; the movie does give a real sense of that hardworking immigrant generation.... it's a shame cuz there is some good material here that (especially with this very solid cast) could have been made into a good movie, but as it is, this is a pretty bad movie.


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6654


Lonesome Billy


« #13091 : February 02, 2014, 01:12:14 AM »

Gravity - 8/10 - This might be the first time I've seen 3D actually add something to a movie. The first 40 minutes or so are amazing stuff; some of the best effects ever, immersive in a way most sci-fi movies can only dream of. After George Clooney's exit it turns into a predictable series of tasks format, but it's still entertaining.

I've seen it twice in IMAX. The second time was a less powerful experience: the scenario is so simple (some say simplistic) that I knew by heart what was going to happen, step by step. It makes the thing less immersive. The BD will be out in less than a month. I wonder how the movie will stand a 2D experience on a regular screen.

Anyway, I'm in love with that movie.


drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9955

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #13092 : February 02, 2014, 03:48:07 AM »

The Joe Louis Story (1953) 7.5/10

The story of heavyweight champion Joe Louis, as narrated by a sportswriter played by Paul Stewart. Really beat-up print on TCM.

Coley Wallace played Joe Louis here - but the actual fight scenes are real footage from the fights (Wallace seems to be much taller than Louis, but hey, who cares).
Fun fact about Wallace (thanks to Wikipedia) - he had a decent career as a professional boxer (going 20-7-0) but "his claim to fame came in 1948 when, as an amateur, he defeated future heavyweight champion Rocky Marciano in the finals of the New York Golden Gloves Tournament."
Marciano, of course, would go on to a professional career in which he never lost a fight, and beat Joe Louis in Louis's final fight.


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #13093 : February 02, 2014, 03:59:59 AM »

The Wonderful Country (1959) Director: Robert Parrish with Robert Mitchum, Julie London, Gary Merrill,  Albert Dekker, Jack Oakie, Charles McGraw, Leroy 'Satchel' Paige, John Banner, Pedro Armendáriz

Ok now I've caught the beginning and end of this the first time on TCM the second time last night but on a channel with commercial breaks, shot in Durango, Mexico, looks beautiful &  interesting and has a great cast, would like to see the full film.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9955

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #13094 : February 02, 2014, 10:12:18 AM »

Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion so I finally saw this movie (rented the Criterion DVD from Netflix), what a disappointment 6/10
(Communists, of all people, decrying brutal government control and police tactics  ;D )


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
: 1 ... 871 872 [873] 874 875 ... 1402  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.053155