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: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  ( 4158380 )
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« #12180 : June 24, 2013, 11:25:53 AM »

Beauty and the Beast - 8/10
Cocteau's?



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« #12181 : June 24, 2013, 12:55:23 PM »

The Conversation - 9/10 - 3rd viewing, second in a week.

Silence of the Lambs - 7/10 - One of those films that's become so iconic it's hard to judge on its own terms. Everything from Cracker to The X-Files to Se7en borrows liberally from its central premise, with varying degrees of success, not to mention endless Hannibal parodies. What surprised me is how restrained the violence is, especially compared to Se7en; the real focus is on characters and faux-realistic FBI procedure, not gore. Jodie Foster does excellent work and Ted Levine makes a creepy villain, but I really couldn't stand Anthony Hopkins. Hard to see why he won an Oscar for this and not performances that required more than a silly hiss and affected line delivery. And yeah, we get some plot twists that are a bit hard to take. I enjoyed seeing our Carnegie Museums in one scene. O0



Hannibal Lecter is one of my favorite movie characters of all time. Great, great performance by Hopkins. As for the whole Oscar debate, you could argue over the screen time issue, but it's a great performance and a great movie.
I am in what is probably a very tiny minority that actually prefers Hannibal to Silence of the Lambs; for me, the latter is a great movie, but the former is one of my very favorite movies ever made. Red Dragon is disappointing - the scenes with the villain there are not very interesting. Hannibal is the one movie that seems to realize that the reason we watch these movies is to see Dr. Lecter, and it's basically an opera about him.

I saw The Conversation once and didn't find it all that interesting.


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« #12182 : June 24, 2013, 02:42:08 PM »

And Then There Were None (1945) 7/10. This Agatha Christie chestnut is presented with a lighter touch than usual. The deaths keep on coming, but also the laughs. The cast includes Walter Huston, Judith Anderson, Roland Young, Barry Fitzgerald, even C. Aubrey Smith. The female talent is supplied by June Duprez, but then, you can't have everything. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7v9rQ7uJTSg



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« #12183 : June 26, 2013, 09:58:37 AM »

COMMUNITY - season 3 9/10

To me season 2 is the real masterpiece. Season 3 is still the best thing happening to comedy shows but things get really crazy too easily almost each episode. I'm rewatching the whole season now to get the other half of the jokes and may change my opinion.
Not very excited to give season 4 a shot since Harmon was not involved in it and seing how heavily criticized it was... But I will eventually watch it since Harmon is back for season 5 and I have to get up to date with the plot and the characters.


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« #12184 : June 26, 2013, 01:21:51 PM »

And Then There Were None (1945) 7/10. This Agatha Christie chestnut is presented with a lighter touch than usual. The deaths keep on coming, but also the laughs. The cast includes Walter Huston, Judith Anderson, Roland Young, Barry Fitzgerald, even C. Aubrey Smith. The female talent is supplied by June Duprez, but then, you can't have everything. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7v9rQ7uJTSg

I was very disappointed by the movie. A bad movie based on a great book.

Most unconscionable is how they changed the ending.

SPOILER ALERT


The ending is THE WHOLE FRIGGIN POINT! How this guy was so brilliant in arranging these deaths of everyone, including himself,  so that nobody will ever figure out how they were accomplished.

When they left the two people alive at the end, it's not merely, okay, so 8 died instead of 10. Rather, it destroys the whole drama, it destroys the whole story, The whole point is the brilliance of the judge's plan and how no one figured it out until they found the bottle.

Put another way, It's not And Then There Were None!



I don't know, maybe the filmmakers thought that reading a letter in a bottle wouldn't make interesting viewing. I think they could have had the letter being read in the judge's voice-over as we see flashback images of how he carried out the plot as described in the letter.



I started watching the other movie version, from the 60's, which they changed to some snowy mountains which are only accessible by cable car or something, it annoyed me after 10 minutes and I shut it off.

I'm still waiting for a great movie to be made from this great book.

« : June 26, 2013, 01:23:01 PM drinkanddestroy »

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« #12185 : June 26, 2013, 04:41:35 PM »

I started watching the other movie version, from the 60's, which they changed to some snowy mountains which are only accessible by cable car or something, it annoyed me after 10 minutes and I shut it off.

I'm still waiting for a great movie to be made from this great book.
The "other" movie version? Dude, this has been filmed about 10 times. If you're looking for something that's faithful to the book, I am told this Russian version does the job: http://stagevu.com/video/mtuvigstjonp



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« #12186 : June 27, 2013, 05:43:59 PM »

Cocteau's?
Disney.

This Is The End - 8/10
For the very specific audience it targets (20-30 y.o. males who are fans of 'Apatow generation'), this is among the best comedies in years. Outside of its target I can't see this being seen as even relatively humorous.

The Bad Sleep Well - 9/10
First viewing of one of Kurosawa's best works. It's my favorite of his crime/noir films over High and Low and Stray Dog. I'm not so sure how I feel about the final death though. It seems way too force in order to make the film's ultimate point. Despite this it's probably one of the best screenplays ever written.

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« #12187 : June 27, 2013, 08:44:42 PM »

The "other" movie version? Dude, this has been filmed about 10 times. If you're looking for something that's faithful to the book, I am told this Russian version does the job: http://stagevu.com/video/mtuvigstjonp

I meant to say the other English-language version; I was talking about the 1965 version, called Ten Little Indians http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061075/?ref_=sr_1
(I see now that there was a third English-language one, also called Ten Little Indians, from 1989, which holds a stellar 4.7/10 rating on IMDB http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0098454/?ref_=sr_3 )

It's not that I am necessarily worried about being faithful to the book. But the entire premise of the movie is having all 10 people die, and we see the genius of the judge how was able to kill everyone including himself and stump Scotland Yard and nobody knew how it was pulled off.
Messing with that is like if a movie about The Old Man and the Sea would have had the old man on a 60-foot luxury yacht catching trophy fish all day.


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« #12188 : June 28, 2013, 10:01:35 AM »

I meant to say the other English-language version; I was talking about the 1965 version, called Ten Little Indians http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061075/?ref_=sr_1
(I see now that there was a third English-language one, also called Ten Little Indians, from 1989, which holds a stellar 4.7/10 rating on IMDB http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0098454/?ref_=sr_3 )
A "third" English-language version? Truth be told, there is a "fourth" version: 1974 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072263/. There is even a "fifth" one, a TV movie from 1959 starring Nina Foch. And, imdb tells me, there was even a "sixth" version done for British TV in 1949 (with Christie's original non-PC title). Then there are all the TV shows that incorporated the plot into one of their episodes (There is a particularly good variation on this in "The Superlative Seven" (1967), an episode of The Avengers.) I submit you haven't seen all the English-language ones, so you don't know whether any have been done to your taste or not.



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« #12189 : June 28, 2013, 04:06:14 PM »

A "third" English-language version? Truth be told, there is a "fourth" version: 1974 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072263/. There is even a "fifth" one, a TV movie from 1959 starring Nina Foch. And, imdb tells me, there was even a "sixth" version done for British TV in 1949 (with Christie's original non-PC title). Then there are all the TV shows that incorporated the plot into one of their episodes (There is a particularly good variation on this in "The Superlative Seven" (1967), an episode of The Avengers.) I submit you haven't seen all the English-language ones, so you don't know whether any have been done to your taste or not.

well that's good to hear.... I mean, if a good one has been done, I'd be very happy.......


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« #12190 : June 29, 2013, 10:03:20 AM »

In Bruges - 8.5/10
Holds up great on a second viewing.

Sanjuro - 4.5/10
Boring. Talk, talk, talk, talk, talk. Sit. Talk, talk talk. Sit. Talk. Of the 20 or so Kurosawa movies I've seen, this is the first that I've disliked. I've never seen the hype for Yojimbo either but it's much better than its sequel.

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« #12191 : June 29, 2013, 12:42:09 PM »

In Bruges - 8.5/10
Holds up great on a second viewing.

It actually gets better to me, since the characters make more and more sens.


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« #12192 : June 29, 2013, 03:27:05 PM »


Sanjuro - 4.5/10
Boring. Talk, talk, talk, talk, talk. Sit. Talk, talk talk. Sit. Talk.
Well, it's not an action movie, it's a comedy. Comedies usually have a lot of talking, as it's the primary means of getting the humor across.

I like the film a lot. AK usually populates his films with so many earnest characters that things can get a bit boring. Here, having already done a fairly straight take on the samurai film (Yojimbo), he takes the opportunity to spoof the genre. That final Thar She Blows moment at the end always cracks me up.



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This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #12193 : June 29, 2013, 06:30:16 PM »

The Man With the Golden Arm - 8/10 - Frank Sinatra struggles to overcome heroin addiction in this memorable melodrama. True, it dilutes the source novel a bit, allowing the protagonist a shot at redemption. But for its time, it's an incredibly dark and daring work, tackling drug addiction with a squeamish directness few films handle even today. Great acting, save perhaps Eleanor Parker's overwrought wife.

Hillsborough - 8/10 - Jimmy McGovern's emotionally-charged take on 1989's Hillsborough Stadium disaster, complete with several Cracker actors. A mixture of docudrama credibility and anger at the incompetent (or worse) police reaction and media coverage, keeping focus on the crush's emotional toll in its survivors.  

« : June 29, 2013, 07:31:21 PM Groggy »


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« #12194 : June 30, 2013, 04:34:59 AM »

1. The Threat (1949) 7.5/10

Noir tough guy Charles McGraw plays an escaped convict out to exact revenge on the cop and prosecutor that got him sent up.


2. Quicksand (1950) 7.5/10

Mickey Rooney plays a mechanic, a normal guy who, in typical noir fashion does one "little" thing wrong, and before he knows it, he's in over his head.

Needing $20 for a date, he "borrows" it from the cash register at the auto garage where he works, knowing he'll return it the next day, when a friend who owes him the money is paying him back. But then, when the accountant shows up 2 days early to count the money in the register, he is desperate to return the $20, so he buys a $100 watch on credit and immediately hocks it for $30. But it turns out there is a law against hocking something you don't fully own, and the watch store is gonna press charges unless he can pay them $100 within 24 hours. Desperate to get the $100............



3. Manpower (1941) 8/10

Edward G. Robinson and George Raft work on a crew that repair damaged electrical wires. One day, a new form of high voltage, in the form of Marlene Deitrich, enters their lives.


As we've discussed extensively here, George Raft is probably the biggest loser in the history of Hollywood. A nobody who somehow was a huge star in the 30's before (thankfully!) totally pissing away his career when he turned down the opportunity to star in films like High Sierra, The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. This movie manages to be good despite him!
According to Wikipedia (not sure about the sources), Raft turned down The Maltese Falcon in order to do this movie, which originally was supposed to have Victor McLaglen in the Robinson role, in which case Raft would have had top billing among the male actors. But then Robinson got the role, which knocked Raft down to third billing (Robinson was first, followed by Deitrich, and then Raft), and Raft, being the loser he is, was all upset about that, and started lots of fights on the set with Robinson. Robinson himself, though he played many gangsters and tough guys in the movies, was actually a very dignified and cultured man in real life. But the loser raft, who was about to go from major star to has-been, started all sorts of fighting on set cuz he wished to be the top dog. (btw, you could make a good case that the raft role here is actually the main role among the actors).

Anyway, this is a good movie, and, as you'll see in the cast list below, features lots of the usual suspects of Warners contract players.


Here is Bosley Crowther's review - I generally despise Crowther in the worst possible way; but I can agree with even a broken clock twice a day.


http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=990CE2D7153FE13BBC4D53DFB166838A659EDE



Movie Review
Manpower (1941)
' Manpower,' Warners' New Two-Fisted Melodrama, at the Strand -- 'Moon Over Miami' at Roxy
By BOSLEY CROWTHER
Published: July 5, 1941

The Warner Brothers, like Vulcan, know the pat way to forge a thunderbolt. They simply pick a profession in which the men are notoriously tough and the mortality rate is high, write a story about it in which both features are persistently stressed, choose a couple of aces from their pack of hard-boiled actors and with these as sorted ingredients whip together a cinematic depth charge. That is what they have got, multiplied a couple of times, in "Manpower," which struck the Strand like a bolt of lightning yesterday.

And why shouldn't it? Just see—the fellows being pictured this time are those rough and roistering linemen who tend the great electric transmission wires. The principal participants in the drama are Edward G. Robinson and George Raft. And the inevitable lady in the case, over whom the solid buddies dispute, is none other than Marlene Dietrich, sporting every dangerous signal save a "high voltage" sign.

With such exceptional material, the Warner blacksmiths couldn't help but make good—good, in this sense—meaning the accomplishment of a tough, fast, exciting adventure film. From the moment that Miss Dietrich enters the picture, cadging cigarettes, it is just one suspenseful build-up to the titanic fight between the Messrs. Robinson and Raft over her. And through it all runs the patter of hard-boiled lineman lingo, several punching battles, in which Mr. Raft excels, and three or four trips on repair jobs, each one of which claims its lineman toll. Quite a business, fixing hot wires.

To say that Mr. Raft and Mr. Robinson make excellent "squirrels" is like saying two and two make four. Mr. Raft is the cynic in romance; Mr. Robinson is the idealist. But both are so frighteningly flinty that love seems much too tame for either one. Thus Miss Dietrich, for all her lounging and dead-pan scorchiness, is placed in the dangerous position of seeming slightly superfluous. She does what she has to do well, but she's in to make trouble—and that's all. As usual, the Warner stock company of hard—boiled buffoons is on hand—Alan Hale, Frank McHugh et al—to horseplay. And several esser lights toss in some additional fire.

Take it from us, "Manpower" is a tough picture, awfully tough. And if you aren't in good condition, you'd better train a bit before seeing it.


MANPOWER; story and screen play by Richard Macaulay and Jerry Wald; directed by Raoul Walsh for Warner Brothers. At the Strand.
Hank McHenry . . . . . Edward G. Robinson
Fay Duval . . . . . Mariene Dietrich
Johnny Marshall . . . . . George Raft
Jumbo Wells . . . . . Alan Hale
Omaha . . . . . Frank McHugh
Pop Duval . . . . . Egon Brecher
Eddie Adams . . . . . Ward Bond
"Dolly" . . . . . Eve Arden
"Scarlett" . . . . . Joyce Compton
"Flo" . . . . . Lucia Carroll
Smiley Quinn . . . . . Barton MacLane
Polly . . . . . Barbara Pepper
Wilma . . . . . Dorothy Appleby
Sweeney . . . . . Joseph Crehan
"Cully" . . . . . Cliff Clark
Sidney Whipple . . . . . Walter Catlett
Al Hurst . . . . . Ben Welden

« : June 30, 2013, 05:00:02 AM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
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