Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
May 24, 2024, 12:13:42 AM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 and 6 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 ... 1387 1388 [1389] 1390 1391 ... 1402
: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  ( 5066410 )
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2397



« #20820 : July 05, 2023, 11:40:54 AM »

While it's been a while since I've last seen Crusade, I don't get the love for it. It's a fine movie, and a great blockbuster, but it takes zero chances and is a crowd pleaser that tries too hard to capture the magic of Raiders. While the aforementioned Raiders is the best of the series, and a masterwork type movie, Temple of Doom is by far the most interesting. It's by no means perfect, but it has the spirit of crazy 60's Japanese Bond influenced movies, but with a huge budget. Temple of Doom is basically if Steven Spielberg directed something like Black Tight Killers (1966) with some Danger Diabolik (1968) and Val Lewton thrown in there -- under the guise of something like Treasure of the Golden Condor (1953).

Raiders > Temple of Doom >> Last Crusade >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Shia LaBeef swinging on vines with monkeys

I have no desire to see Indy 5, but I think it would probably make me appreciate the first 60+ mins of Crystal Skull, which is not a feeling I want to experience.

« : July 05, 2023, 11:54:09 AM T.H. »


Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6654


Lonesome Billy


« #20821 : July 05, 2023, 12:04:12 PM »

I agree Doom is the most interesting one. It never really clicked with me for some reason (except for the opening).
I agree that Last Crusade tries to recapture the magic of Raiders, but to me it succeeds while refining it. It's one of the best shot movies I have ever seen. The scenes that aren't shot in studio have a way to capture my eyes. Even a dumb shot of the tank turning around has me stuck in awe: never I have watched a tank with as much intensity (which makes it even dumber that they went with that much CGI in Skull and, from what I understand, Dial). It's also an incredibly dense movie, with an idea per shot. It just keeps getting better with each viewing, and i've seen it dozens of times. Way more than all of the other indiana jones movies combined.

I have no desire to see Indy 5, but I think it would probably make me appreciate the first 60+ mins of Crystal Skull

That's my bet.


T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2397



« #20822 : July 05, 2023, 02:29:24 PM »

Interesting. I thought the first two were the best from a filmmaking standpoint, but it's been a long time since I've seen Crusade. I'm definitely due for a rewatch of the first three.



Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16797


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #20823 : July 06, 2023, 05:06:03 PM »

Good Will Hunting (1997) 5/10. I don't know where Afleck and Damon got their screenplay-writing instruction, but they missed the lesson called "Kill Your Darlings." That's the one where budding screenwriters are exhorted to edit their writing with extreme prejudice. Yes, it's satisfying writing good scenes and then finding places to fit them all to fit. But, in fact, they can't all fit. Some good things have to be discarded, if only to make space for some other more deserving good thing. Case in point: Afleck and Damon wrote two different interaction scenes requiring late film payoffs. The first interaction is between Will (Damon) and the brilliant-but-tortured shrink, played by the brilliant-but-tortured actor, Robin Williams. Williams tells a story about missing a famous Red Sox world series game in order to go on a first date with his future wife--a real carpe diem lesson.

Then there is an interaction between Will and his bestie, Afleck, where Afleck says he expects Will not to be there one morning when he comes by to pick him up--an indication that Will has moved on to his greater destiny,  a destiny Afleck wants to experience vicariously. So, at the end of the film, Afleck comes by Will's house and Will doesn't answer the door. Afleck looks in the windows and sees there's no one home; there's a moment of puzzlement, and then Afleck gets an oh-wow-I-get-it look in his eye. All the beats in the scene land.

But then there's also a final scene where Robin Williams finds a letter left for him from Will where Will references the earlier conversation they had about the first date thing and even quotes him something the Williams character had said to him at the time. This gives Williams the chance to say, "hey, he stole my line." Again, nice beats. Both payoffs work, but one of those is one payoff too many. Afleck/Damon should have chosen one and deep-sixed the other (the conclusion with Williams is more significant and should have been the one to keep). Yes, it was a rookie mistake, and they can be forgiven for making it first-time out. But I don't want to hear from anyone ever again about how wonderful the screenplay for this is.



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6654


Lonesome Billy


« #20824 : July 07, 2023, 12:52:48 AM »

Good Will Hunting (1997) 5/10. I don't know where Afleck and Damon got their screenplay-writing instruction, but they missed the lesson called "Kill Your Darlings." That's the one where budding screenwriters are exhorted to edit their writing with extreme prejudice. Yes, it's satisfying writing good scenes and then finding places to fit them all to fit. But, in fact, they can't all fit. Some good things have to be discarded, if only to make space for some other more deserving good thing. Case in point: Afleck and Damon wrote two different interaction scenes requiring late film payoffs. The first interaction is between Will (Damon) and the brilliant-but-tortured shrink, played by the brilliant-but-tortured actor, Robin Williams. Williams tells a story about missing a famous Red Sox world series game in order to go on a first date with his future wife--a real carpe diem lesson.

Then there is an interaction between Will and his bestie, Afleck, where Afleck says he expects Will not to be there one morning when he comes by to pick him up--an indication that Will has moved on to his greater destiny,  a destiny Afleck wants to experience vicariously. So, at the end of the film, Afleck comes by Will's house and Will doesn't answer the door. Afleck looks in the windows and sees there's no one home; there's a moment of puzzlement, and then Afleck gets an oh-wow-I-get-it look in his eye. All the beats in the scene land.

But then there's also a final scene where Robin Williams finds a letter left for him from Will where Will references the earlier conversation they had about the first date thing and even quotes him something the Williams character had said to him at the time. This gives Williams the chance to say, "hey, he stole my line." Again, nice beats. Both payoffs work, but one of those is one payoff too many. Afleck/Damon should have chosen one and deep-sixed the other (the conclusion with Williams is more significant and should have been the one to keep). Yes, it was a rookie mistake, and they can be forgiven for making it first-time out. But I don't want to hear from anyone ever again about how wonderful the screenplay for this is.

Maybe the fact that they wrote it as their own showreel might have something to do with that?

Anyway I've decided a long time ago to never speak about Good Will Hunting anymore since everything that had to be said about it has been said over there:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHM2_uGeVlw


cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #20825 : July 07, 2023, 03:58:05 AM »

Voyage Sans Espoir (1943) Directed by Christian-Jaque (L?enfer des anges (1939), L?assassinat du p?re No?l  aka  Who killed Santa Claus ? (1941), Un revenant (1946). Souvenirs perdus aka Lost souvenirs (1950).

Written by Pierre Mac Orlan (Le quai des brumes aka Port of Shadows (1938)) from an adaptation by Christian-Jaque and Marc-Gilbert Sauvajon from a story by Georg C. Klaren and Maurice Krol, with additional dialogue by Marc-Gilbert Sauvajon.

A great early Film Noir.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16797


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #20826 : July 13, 2023, 04:10:45 AM »

Tangled (2010) - 6/10. Disney's take on Rapunzel. I was blissfully unaware of this animated feature until about two weeks ago, but now I've seen it four times. Yes, I've been babysitting my granddaughter. I've also had to watch most of Frozen (zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz) and have twice had to sit through The Little Mermaid (execrable), but for some reason Tangled is the favored title. It's actually easier to take then most Disney films. For one thing, it has two characters, one, a sidekick, and another, an antagonist (who later transforms into a buddy), neither of whom ever speak. They spend the whole film mugging and it works pretty well (and cuts down on some of the usual obnoxious Disney Dialog). Also, the plotting isn't bad, with some imaginative rewriting to the original Grimm story (they get out of the tower and go on the road). Finally, there are a lot of visual references to Maxfield Parrish paintings, which cleverly repurposes works I never cared for to help provide an appropriate Once Upon a Time setting. It allows me to play Spot the Quotation, anyway. So I'm sure I'll be able to endure a fifth, sixth, maybe even a seventh or eighth viewing of this Family Friendly Flick.

But wait. What's with all the bigotry in these Disney films, anyway? At the end of The Little Mermaid, Ariel gives up being a mermaid to live as a happy two-legged land dweller--a clear ableist message if there ever was one. And at the end of Tangled, Rapunzel has her magic hair cut off so she can better fit in to her society. Both pictures seem to be teaching kids that they should give up whatever makes them special and try to be like everyone else.

WTF, Walt?



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #20827 : July 13, 2023, 08:06:56 AM »

Tangled (2010) - 6/10. Disney's take on Rapunzel. I was blissfully unaware of this animated feature until about two weeks ago, but now I've seen it four times. Yes, I've been babysitting my granddaughter. I've also had to watch most of Frozen (zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz) and have twice had to sit through The Little Mermaid (execrable), but for some reason Tangled is the favored title. It's actually easier to take then most Disney films. For one thing, it has two characters, one, a sidekick, and another, an antagonist (who later transforms into a buddy), neither of whom ever speak. They spend the whole film mugging and it works pretty well (and cuts down on some of the usual obnoxious Disney Dialog). Also, the plotting isn't bad, with some imaginative rewriting to the original Grimm story (they get out of the tower and go on the road). Finally, there are a lot of visual references to Maxfield Parrish paintings, which cleverly repurposes works I never cared for to help provide an appropriate Once Upon a Time setting. It allows me to play Spot the Quotation, anyway. So I'm sure I'll be able to endure a fifth, sixth, maybe even a seventh or eighth viewing of this Family Friendly Flick.

But wait. What's with all the bigotry in these Disney films, anyway? At the end of The Little Mermaid, Ariel gives up being a mermaid to live as a happy two-legged land dweller--a clear ableist message if there ever was one. And at the end of Tangled, Rapunzel has her magic hair cut off so she can better fit in to her society. Both pictures seem to be teaching kids that they should give up whatever makes them special and try to be like everyone else.

WTF, Walt?

Nice analysis. And a heads up of what I got to anticipate in the future with the new grandkids.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6654


Lonesome Billy


« #20828 : July 16, 2023, 03:44:39 AM »

Pulp Fiction (QT, 1994) - 9 or 10/10
482th viewing, but actually the first one in years. Planning to watch everything QT in the chronological order this summer. I absolutely love that movie but I would love to be able to erase it from my memory and watch it with new eyes again, as I cannot get involved anymore in what happens. I'd love to remember how it feels to see Travolta again after he was killed.


cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #20829 : July 17, 2023, 10:40:55 AM »

Voyage sans espoir (1943) opening title sequence

https://studio.youtube.com/video/OcLlatzZstI/edit


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16797


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #20830 : July 21, 2023, 02:40:30 AM »

Mission Impossible 7: Dead Reckoning Part 1 (2023) 5/10. Surprisingly dull. The IMF--the Impossible Mission Force--should now call themselves the Impossible Exposition Force. That's because the story is so high concept, members of the cast have to spend large chunks of screen time explaining it all to us (who knew AI could be so uncinematic?). But the talky scenes are at least contrasted with the exciting action set pieces, right? Not so fast, Popcorn Breath! There's the firefight in the desert during a sandstorm (zzzz), the interminable running-about-in-the airport at Abu Dhabi (yawn), the car chase sequence in Rome (hey, let's take a mini Fiat up and down some famous steps!), the running-about-in-the-narrow-alleys of Venice, a boring party scene with yet another meeting where people talk and talk. And so on. Things just drag on and on, and even IMAX can't save the film. Yes, the stunt where Cruise rides his bike off a cliff in the Alps (played by Norway) is well done, but it was so heavily featured in promotion it was kind of spoiled for the picture. To give the movie it's due, though, there is one clever and well-executed gag with a train during the climax, but it's a bit too little, too late. I was exhausted at the end of the film; the prospect of seeing Part 2 next year appeals to me not in the least.



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #20831 : July 28, 2023, 03:46:28 PM »




La muerte silba un blues aka Death Whistles the Blues (1964) Directed by composer / musician - Jes?s Franco.  A solid international Noir the story set in Spain - New Orleans - Jamaica shot mostly in Andalusia Spain with establishing shots of Jamaica all set to a good jazz score.

The film stars Conrado San Mart?n as Alfred "Joao"  Pereira / Federico de Castro, Manuel Alexandre as musician Julius Smith, Georges Rollin as Paul Vogle / Radeck, Perla Cristal as Lina, Danik Patisson as Moira Santos, Mike Brendel as Pulgarcito, Joe Brown   as Joe, Jimmy Wright as Jimmy, and Adriano Dom?nguez as Comisario Folch.

It reminded me of a bit of Costa-Gavras The Sleeping Car Murder( Compartiment tueurs).


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2397



« #20832 : July 29, 2023, 02:10:45 PM »

Field of Dreams (1989) - It's much better shot than I remembered, and the pace flies. It basically boils down to how much you love baseball, especially the mystique of baseball's past. Outside of the movie being about fathers and sons, and the rekindling of an adult's love of the game that they had as a child, or something like that, Field of Dreams is also a movie about stripping away one's baggage and coming to terms with it and moving on -- albeit in Disney-like fashion. Or what 'Disney-like fashion' used to mean.

It's simultaneously a ridiculous and brilliant concept, and while the story could have been structured better -- it should have taken more time to figure out to build a baseball field and piece together the Shoeless Joe element, but ultimately everything works -- if you love baseball. It may tug on the heartstrings in a manipulative manner, but there is a powerful quality to his movie -- if you love baseball. which I happen to do. My heart says A but my mind is thinking B+.



Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16797


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #20833 : August 01, 2023, 01:16:45 AM »

Harikomi / Stakeout (1958) - 7/10. Two Tokyo cops take the long pre-Shinkansen ride out to Saga, Kyushu to stakeout Hideko Takamine, an old flame of a man now wanted for murder. A dull police procedural is enlivened with frequent flashbacks and location photography in a 2.35:1 AR. Almost everything was filmed in Saga and the surrounding countryside; studio shooting was kept to a minimum. Nice jazz score also.
I'm in Japan for the summer for family-related events, and during a lull in the proceedings the wife and I decided to take a quick trip out to Nagasaki (I've never been, thought it might be interesting). Man, is it far from Tokyo. Eight hours on the bullet train. After about 6-and-a-half I noticed we were pulling into the station for a place called "Saga." For some reason, it rang a bell. Just as we were pulling out, the bell went into total spastic mode. Saga, oh, yeah . . . .



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14242


easy come easy go


« #20834 : August 03, 2023, 02:27:45 PM »

The Night of the Following Day (1969) American Euro Noir
Directed by Hubert Cornfield (Sudden Danger, Plunder Road, The 3rd Voice) and Richard Boone. Written by Hubert Cornfield, Robert Phippeny and based on the novel by Lionel White

Cinematography by Willy Kurant (China Moon, Je t'aime moi non plus).  Music was by Stanley Myers.

The film stars Marlon Brando as Bud, the Chauffeur, Richard Boone as Leer, Rita Moreno as Vi, the Blonde Air Stewardess, Pamela Franklin as Girl, Jess Hahn as Walley (Friendly), Gerard Buhr as Cop-Fisherman, Jacques Marin as the Bartender, Huques Wanner as Father, and Al Lettieri as Pilot.

Hubert Cornfield made a beautiful looking film that's worth a watch from Noir fans. Supposedly Brando and Corfield had issues and Richard Boone had to film his scenes. For me a 6.5-7/10.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
: 1 ... 1387 1388 [1389] 1390 1391 ... 1402  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.093154