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: Last Book You Read  ( 453595 )
marmota-b
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It's perfect timing, large one...


« #360 : September 24, 2009, 02:49:56 PM »

Do what I did and read the comic that P. Craig Russell did of it. A fabulous adaptation.

I suspect it'll be easier for me to find Wagner's version than the comics... although I'm sure it must be fabulous.



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« #361 : October 04, 2009, 01:43:40 PM »

I finally got through the Lawrence book - sat down and devoured 300 or so pages of it Friday night. A bit dry in spots but worth slogging through.

Yesterday I purchased Rick Perlstein's book Nixonland about the 1968 and 1972 elections. It's very good so far except that a) it's written from an obvious left-wing perspective (the Vietnam War parts in particular are amusingly simplistic), and b) he seems to view Nixon as being at fault for everything that went wrong in America during that time period (Watergate and government impropriety, sure; polarization over Vietnam and Civil Rights, hardly). Also, his thesis that the violent culture wars of that time period never went away seems pretty shaky, particularly because the evidence he presents contradicts his own ostensible thesis (where are the gays and illegal immigrants fire-bombing San Francisco and LA? where are pro- and anti-war protestors beating each other up on the streets? where are the politicians and political leaders being gunned down left and right?). Still, in spite of Perlstein's biases, I'm enjoying it through the first 130 pages. Very well-written if nothing else, and I'm finding the subject matter increasingly interesting the more I read on it.

« : October 04, 2009, 01:47:39 PM Groggy »


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« #362 : October 05, 2009, 04:43:24 AM »

The Accursed Kings (Les rois maudits) - aka the Badass Historical Novel. It's filled with awesome characters. Some of them poison kings out of hobby. Almost everyone commits adultery, and at least one murder per person. Lots of intrigue, and thanks to history, everyone gets what they deserve. It has some hilarious murder methods - poisoned CANDLE not being the most weird. Oh, and a story in which the Knight Templars are not mysterious - they are simply executed. No holy grail or conspiracy. But the Grand Master curses King Philip IV's family. It works out very well.


To The End Of The Earth - Golding's sea trilogy. It was good, despite the bastard killed off my favourite character. On a burning ship. Meh.


Well, to Moby Dick... I like it despite the biology stuff. But it's still better than, for example, Borodino. I felt sorry that the hilarious Ishamel/Queequeg bed scenes stopped after they boarded Pequod. I giggled so much. But anyway, Stubb is stealing the show with his humour, and Starbuck is just adorably normal.


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« #363 : October 05, 2009, 12:23:23 PM »

I don't read as much as I'd like, so I've been making a more earnest attempt to get through some of the many books plied up on my shelves.

The last book I read was Our Man Flint, by Jack Pearl.

I'm currently reading Fool's Parade, by Davis Grubb.

Previously, I'd read "Inside Star Trek," and the David Carradine bio, "Endless Highway."

I have a 45 minute bus ride to work, (and back) so I've been doing most of my reading there (with the iPod on, listening to movie scores)

Greg :)

« : October 05, 2009, 12:37:44 PM riotengine »

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« #364 : October 09, 2009, 12:00:49 PM »

Recently read a short-story collection by Stephen King. It was the first part of Skeleton Crew which was published in two parts in Finnish. It was Ok, nothing mind-blowing, and the stories were varying in style and quality.

After finishing with King I made a bold move and borrowed a collection of short-stories by Franz Kafka. I didn't get far, only 20-30 pages into Description of a Struggle. I guess I'll read my Kafka later. Now I borrowed Oliver Twist.


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« #365 : October 13, 2009, 11:23:19 AM »

Tentatively started the HUGE Reclaiming History by Vincent Bugliosi, about the Kennedy Assassination, which runs to about 1600 pages. I already read the abridged version (Four Days in November), hopefully I'll have time to get through this damned thing.

« : October 18, 2009, 03:47:52 PM Mr. Freeze »


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« #366 : October 18, 2009, 03:43:51 PM »




I bought it two weeks ago in London and just finished it. It is full of infos on many westerns. For ex. Boetticher wrote Two Mules for him (and also confirms that his story was different from the one filmed). Also Eastwood's part in Dirty Harry was offered to him.; that also he chose Five Card Stud over Holden's part in WB. Indispensable for Mitchum's fans like me, I guess, though I still have to wade through the rest of literature about him.. I give it 8\10 because the pictures are few and strangely do not cover his life before Hollywood.

« : October 18, 2009, 03:47:30 PM titoli »

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« #367 : October 18, 2009, 04:17:11 PM »

Quote
For ex. Boetticher wrote Two Mules for him (and also confirms that his story was different from the one filmed).

Any details as to how so?


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« #368 : October 18, 2009, 05:03:38 PM »

Any details as to how so?


Nope. I can add that Sister Sara was to be played by mexican Silvia Pinal.


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It's perfect timing, large one...


« #369 : October 19, 2009, 03:58:51 PM »

Related to the Beowulf and Wagner discussion, I went through Lin Carter's book on Lord of the Rings again (I do not remember the exact name). It's a study that was written in 1960s, and therefore some of the stuff in it is outdated (it was before the publication of The Silmarillion, and some of Carter's descriptions of Tolkien's world and speculations about it turned out to be wrong). But it's a thing that puts it into perspective really well, in my opinion, and especially discusses those sources of Wagner's and Tolkien's work nicely.
And it brought to my attention some other authors of fantastic prose that sound interesting and whom i might check out one day.



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« #370 : November 01, 2009, 10:15:19 AM »

My birthday haul this year includes:

A Magnificent Catastrophe: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 - Edward J. Larson
Alexander Hamilton: A Biography - Ron Chernow
Case Closed: Lee Harvey Oswald and the Assassination of John F. Kennedy - Gerald Posner
Your Movie Sucks - Roger Ebert

Plus I bought Max Boot's The Savage Wars of Peace, about various small-scale American military interventions (NOT to be confused with the almost-idenitcally titled Alistair Horne book about the Algerian War) at the Westmoreland Mall yesterday. I'm already about halfway through it, might even finish it today depending on how much free time I have after work.

« : November 01, 2009, 10:17:00 AM Groggy »


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« #371 : November 01, 2009, 04:03:00 PM »

The last book I finished reading was Philip K. Dick's Ubik, wich I liked very much. Then I started reading Mother Night by Kurt Vonnegut, but had to put that aside for a while because I have to read To Kill a Mockingbird for English Class, but that's fine, so far I like To Kill A Mockingbird very much.


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« #372 : November 20, 2009, 03:57:45 PM »

Reclaiming History: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy by Vincent Bugliosi - Incredibly comprehensive (1600+ pages!!!) debunking of the various JFK conspiracy theories, both proving Oswald's guilt and exonerrating the various parties accused by conspiracy theorists over the years. The sheer amount of information presented is exhausting, but fortunately Bugliosi is a good enough author (with a wonderfully caustic sense of humor) to make it worth slogging through at least one.

The Savage Wars of Peace: America's Small Wars by Max Boot - pretty good history with a very interesting analysis of America's 200 years of military intervention in the Third World. Only when the author's (right-wing) politics start to seep into the narrative in later chapters does it start to lose it.

A Magnificent Catastrophe: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, America's First Presidential Campaign by Edward J. Larson - pretty dry despite the interesting subject matter. Fortunately pretty easy to read.

Hegemony or Survival by Noam Chomsky - left-wing whining about America's evil based on selective and highly flawed analysis of facts and politics, with sloppy sourcing and rather banal writing. Except for his academic pedigree, there's little to separate Chomsky from idiots like Rush Limbaugh, Ann Coulter or Michael Moore.

Still slugging my way through Casey Tefertiller's bio of Wyatt Earp, hopefully I can finish it over the weekend.



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« #373 : November 22, 2009, 04:08:40 PM »

I've restarted Foundation, an interesting sci-fi book that I almost finished in my youth (why was I such a damn slacker? so many opportunities wasted), and unfortunately I'm obligated to reread Ender's Game (another classic work of science-fiction) which I did finish in my youth (although it was a close one). Thankfully it's a quick read, and I'll probably get hooked again and might look into the rest of the series (I'd started Ender's Shadow, again, in my youth). Recently, I decided that I would be determined to finish any book that I started of my own free will, so I know I'll try to finish Foundation, but Ender's Game will have to find time in my schedule.
Anyways Foundation is about the fall of the Galactic Empire, and its premise is based on Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. A brilliant mathematician named Hari Seldon has found a new branch of mathematics called psychohistory, based on statistical probability, which will be able to predict the time of the fall and the barborous dark ages. The first part (of five) is about Seldon arranging to have his followers relocated from Trantor (the capital of the empire) to a distant planet on the edge of the galaxy called Terminus. The next four are episodes regarding Seldon's plans for the future, which are carried out by his followers (the Foundation) after his death.
After those two, I plan to look into finding a copy of The Stories of Aesopus (the first recommendation in 1001 Books to Read Before You Die, which is by no means a perfect literary guide, but I suppose it gets the basics). I checked one library, and all their copies of it were compilations for children. I'm looking for the complete transcript of his fables (with all the rape, gore, murder, and blackmail teehee).

« : November 29, 2009, 02:24:51 PM stoicamerican »
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« #374 : November 29, 2009, 02:03:59 PM »

I forgot to mention that I was also giving Into Thin Air a shot. Again. As I've stated, when I was younger, although I read a lot, I had trouble keeping attention to what I was reading. It's an interesting read so far. Krakauer's a good journalist.
I finished Foundation. This is a very good book, and although the concept of psychohistory (which is key to the story) is explained rather vaguely (so that actual and aspiring scientists don't look at it and say "Hey, this is all bullshit! Asimov's a phoney!"), it's still a great example of social engineering in fiction. As fate would have it, this is one of two Asimov books (with I, Robot) in 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die which I'm going to be going through numerically as soon as I finish Ender's Game. I look forward to rereading this. It was a pleasant and quick read, unlike Dracula (which was still fairly good), which (although on the list) I'm not looking forward to rereading.
I'm slowly translating Books from the Founding of the City by Titus Livius (Livy to the majority of anglophiles, but I prefer to stick to the transliteration). I have the Latin text.
So in case anybody lost track of what I'm doing in the confusing mass of text I just wrote and still cares: I'm reading Into Thin Air (as my primary effort), Ender's Game (secondary, for book club), and reading/translating (for the hell of getting a fairly literal translation out there) Books from the Founding of the City. After that, I'll be picking up The Stories of Aesopus (again I don't use anglicized names when it's written in the same alphabet), and then The Stand, one of King's best works to refresh my memory on some details.

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